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6 Successful Entrepreneurs Who Struggle Through Dyslexia

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6 Successful Entrepreneurs Who Struggle Through Dyslexia

The people on this list are exceptional leaders and successful entrepreneurs in their respective fields. They’re all well known for their success as entrepreneurs, thought leaders, and innovators. Yet they’ve all had to overcome insurmountable odds – dyslexia, to get there.

1. Henry Ford

    In his effort to overcome his dyslexia, Ford would often repeat actions to the point where they were second nature. This helped him fine-tune his abilities and launch one of the most successful companies in the world.

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    2. Thomas Edison

      Most people know Edison as a scientist. They probably wouldn’t know Edison overcame his dyslexia to launch an electric and engineering company that would soon become General Electric. GE is now a multinational conglomerate listed on the Fortune 500.

      3. Richard Branson

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        Perhaps the most famous business leader with dyslexia is Sir Richard Branson. The British entrepreneur parlayed his success with a student magazine into an international brand and conglomerate – Virgin Inc. Branson often says dyslexia should be considered a sign of potential.

        4. Jamie Oliver

          Dyslexia didn’t stop Jamie Oliver from becoming one of the world’s most well-known chefs and business leaders. His ‘Jamie’s Kitchen’ chain of restaurants span the globe. Unbelievably, Jamie read his first book at the age of 38.

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          5. Ingvar Kamprad

            Ikea founder Ingvar Kamprad has managed to create a globally recognized retailer while battling dyslexia.

            6. Charles Schwab

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              The CEO of Charles Schwab & Co. struggled to take notes in school and even failed English twice. He didn’t realize he suffered from dyslexia till his son was diagnosed with the same condition.

              If you’re an aspiring entrepreneur, don’t hesitate to reach out for help and assistance. And always remember the lessons you can learn from these successful people and don’t let anything block you from pursuing your path to success.

              More by this author

              Nabin Paudyal

              Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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              Last Updated on January 13, 2022

              How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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              How to Use Travel Time Effectively

              Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

              Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

              Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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              1. Take Your Time Getting There

              As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

              But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

              Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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              2. Go Gadget-Free

              This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

              If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

              3. Reflect and Prepare

              Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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              After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

              Conclusion

              Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

              More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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              If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

              Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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