Advertising
Advertising

The Actual Reason Why We Spend Excessive Time in Toilet Despite High Fibre Intake.

The Actual Reason Why We Spend Excessive Time in Toilet Despite High Fibre Intake.

We don’t always like admitting our toilet problems but when it comes to constipation, chances are you’ve experienced this condition more than once. This is because it’s a hugely common problem affecting adults and children of all ages.

But what causes constipation? We’re often led to believe it’s solely down to lack of fibre in the diet and while this a major cause, there are other factors that can cause this – sometimes painful – condition.

Surprisingly, constipation is a common symptom of magnesium deficiency. A Japanese study [1] looked at 3,835 female students, 26.2% of whom suffered from constipation. They found that together with low-fibre, lack of magnesium was a high factor in their bouts of constipation.

Why Is Magnesium So Important?

Magnesium may not be on the forefront of our minds when it comes to our health, but amazingly this mineral is involved in over 300 different reactions in the body. It’s therefore essential that we get enough of the recommended daily intake of magnesium to promote optimum health.

Besides constipation, a lack of magnesium can cause insomnia, anxiety and depression, irritability, fatigue, muscle pain, insulin resistance, gut disorders plus many more.

In other words, it helps the heart, muscles, and immune system function properly. It’s so central to the workings of the body that not getting enough can cause underlying symptoms that we often put down to other factors and over half of us aren’t getting enough magnesium on daily basis.

Advertising

Insufficient Awareness on Magnesium Intake

Despite it being so important to many functional processes in the body, many people actually have a magnesium deficiency without realising.

Magnesium isn’t easily absorbed by the digestive track and can be even more difficult to absorb if you already have a deficiency in vitamin D or even a number of other conditions. We are very conscious of fats and sugars in our diet but often don’t consider whether we eat the sort of foods that can be high in magnesium.

And while magnesium supplements can give us a boost, knowing what foods contain the highest amounts of magnesium is the best way to deal with conditions including constipation.

10 Foods High in Magnesium

It’s recommended that adult men get 400mg of magnesium a day (420mg for men aged over 30) while women ideally get around 310mg (increased to 320mg once over 30).

By eating the right foods, you should get the right amount of magnesium through your diet so which foods are the best to consume?

Almonds

Advertising

    105mg per 1/4 cup: Almonds are not only rich in vitamin E, high in protein and omega-3 fats but they pack a punch when it comes to magnesium. It’s ideal not to eat too many but add them as a small snack or to a meal will boost your magnesium intake.

    Bananas

      33mg in one medium banana: Bananas are more well-known for their high potassium levels but if you eat a good amount of them you’ll be happy to know they contain some magnesium. You can find some healthy banana recipes here [2] to get more into your diet.

      Oatmeal

        57.6 mg per 1 cup cooked: Oatmeal is twice as good for constipation as it’s high in fibre as well as magnesium. Make it with skimmed milk that contains vitamin D (which helps to absorb magnesium) and you’ve got a good boost every morning for breakfast.

        Sunflower Seeds

        Advertising

          128mg per 1/4 cup: Although these need to be eaten in moderation, just a quarter of a cup will get you 25-30% of your daily magnesium intake. They’re also full of calcium and can help fight bad cholesterol.

          Dark Leafy Greens

            157mg per 1 cup (steamed): Dark leafy greens especially spinach is extremely high in magnesium. The best thing is spinach is so versatile you can add it to your breakfast, lunch and dinner to get most of your daily intake. Try these recipes [3] to spice up your spinach.

            Cashew Nuts

              89mg per 1/4 cup: Cashews are high in fat so you need to watch how much you eat in a day but getting a handful as a snack will provide you with a good dose of magnesium. Not only that but a serving provides a good amount of iron, folate and vitamin K.

              Broccoli

              Advertising

                51 mg per ½ cup cooked: You can’t really eat too much broccoli and while it contains fibre, it also has more vitamin C than an orange. It’s best to steam it to preserve as many of the vitamins and minerals as possible that get destroyed during the boiling process.

                Sweetcorn

                  33 mg per 1 ear of corn: Adding corn to your daily meals will also boost your magnesium intake. It’s also a whole grain so high in fibre for good bowel movements as well as a good source of vitamin C and B. Resist the salt and butter though instead opting for olive oil or a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

                  Peas

                    48 mg per 1 cup: Peas often get overlooked but they are a great source of magnesium. Find some interesting ways to use your peas here.

                    Sesame Seeds

                      101mg in 1 ounce: The best thing about sesame seeds is that you can add them to almost anything whether sprinkled on a salad, on top of salmon or mixed into sauces. It’s high in zinc and vitamin B6 but will get your magnesium levels soaring.

                      Reference

                      More by this author

                      Jenny Marchal

                      Freelance Writer

                      How to Save a Bunch of Money Easily With This Simple Challenge Success In Reaching Goals Is Determined By Mindset 11 Killer Ways To Get Rid Of Roaches Without Harming You If You Understand These 5 Rules In Psychology, You Can Live A Much Easier Life How To Get Over Someone You Deeply Love

                      Trending in Health

                      1 How to Stop Feeling Tired All the Time (And the Real Causes Explained) 2 Why Am I So Tired? 10 Reasons You’re Extremely Tired And How to Fix It 3 How to Tell Symptoms of Social Anxiety And What to Do About It 4 Why Am I Exhausted? The Real Causes and How to Fix It Forever 5 How Mental Fatigue Eats You Slowly (And Ways to Regain Mental Energy)

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on October 16, 2018

                      What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

                      What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

                      Are you afraid of being alone?  Do you worry about your physical safety or do you fear loneliness? These are strong negative feelings that can impact your health.

                      One study found that when older people are socially isolated, there is an increased risk of an earlier death,[1] by as much as 26%.

                      If you experience loneliness and are worried about your fear of being alone, study these 6 ways to help you find your comfort zone.

                      But first, the good news!

                      How many times have you said to yourself, ‘I just can’t wait to be alone’? This might be after a day’s work, an argument with your partner or after a noisy dinner with friends. You need time to be yourself, gather your thoughts, relish the silence and just totally chill out. These are precious moments and are very important for your own peace of mind and mental refreshment.

                      But for many people, this feeling is not often present and loneliness takes over. As Joss Whedon once said,

                      ‘Loneliness is about the scariest thing out there’.

                      Read on and discover how you can exploit being alone to your own advantage and how you can defeat loneliness.

                      Advertising

                      1. Embrace loneliness

                      When you are alone, it is important to embrace it and enjoy it to the full.

                      Wallow in the feeling that you do not have to be accountable for anything you do. Pursue your interests and hobbies. Take up new ones. Learn new skills. Lie on the couch. Leave the kitchen in a mess. The list can go on and on, but finding the right balance is crucial.

                      There will be times when being on your own is perfect, but then there will be a creeping feeling that you should not be so isolated.

                      When you start to enjoy being alone, these 10 amazing things will happen.

                      Once you start feeling loneliness, then it is time to take action.

                      2. Facebook is not the answer

                      Have you noticed how people seek virtual contacts instead of a live, face-to-face interaction? It is true that social networking can provide an initial contact, but the chances of that becoming a real life personal contact is pretty slim.

                      Being wrapped up in a cloud of sharing, liking and commenting (and insulting!) can only increase loneliness.

                      Advertising

                      When you really want company, no one on Facebook will phone you to invite you out.

                      3. Stop tolerating unhappy relationships

                      It is a cruel fact of life that people are so scared of loneliness that they often opt into a relationship with the wrong person.

                      There is enormous pressure from peers, family and society in general to get married or to be in a stable, long-term relationship. When this happens, people start making wrong decisions, such as:

                      • hanging out with toxic company such as dishonest or untrustworthy people;
                      • getting involved with unsuitable partners because of the fear of being alone or lonesome;
                      • accepting inappropriate behavior just because of loneliness;
                      • seeking a temporary remedy instead of making a long-term decision.

                      The main problem is that you need to pause, reflect and get advice. Recognize that your fear of being alone is taking over. A rash decision now could lead to endless unhappiness.

                      4. Go out and meet people

                      It was the poet John Donne (1572 – 1631) who wrote:

                      ‘No man is an island, entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent’.

                      Human contact is essential to surviving in this world. Instead of wallowing in boredom and sadness, you need to get out as much as possible and seek contacts.

                      Advertising

                      Being a member of a group, however tenuous, is a great way. So when you are in the gym, at church or simply at a club meeting, exploit these contacts to enlarge your social circle.

                      There is no point in staying at home all the time. You will not meet any new people there!

                      Social contacts are rather like delicate plants. You have to look after them. That means telephoning, using Skype and being there when needed.

                      Take a look at this guide on How to Meet New People and Make Friends with The Best.

                      5. Reach out to help someone in need

                      A burden shared is a burden halved.

                      Dag Hammarskjold was keenly aware of this fact when he said:

                      ‘What makes loneliness an anguish is not that I have no one to share my burden but this: I have only my own burden to bear’.

                      Simply put, it is a two-way street. Helping others actually helps yourself, here’s why.

                      Reach out to help and people will be there when you need them.

                      6. Be grateful and count your blessings

                      Study after study shows that if people show gratitude, they will reap a bountiful harvest. These include a stronger immune system, better health, more positive energy and most important of all, feeling less lonely and isolated.

                      If you do not believe me, watch the video below, ‘What good is gratitude?’  Now here is the path to hope and happiness:

                      Featured photo credit: Anthony Tran via unsplash.com

                      Reference

                      Read Next