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Farewell to Feeling of Powerless and Drowsiness: You Need Potassium.

Farewell to Feeling of Powerless and Drowsiness: You Need Potassium.

There are loads of reasons to ensure that you consume enough potassium daily. Firstly, potassium is key for efficient muscular tissue functionality. Potassium also maintains electrolyte and fluid balance and is the third highest mineral level in the body. It is required for the adequate functioning of the kidneys, heart, and the brain.

Potassium has a role in keeping the body hydrated and supports cellular function along with sodium. When potassium levels lower, the result will have severe effects.

The main causes of low potassium include diarrhea, dehydration and taking too many laxatives. Some medication affecting potassium levels in the in the body are ‘diuretics’, commonly known as water pills.

Low potassium symptoms are undesirable even though they may be mild or vague. These are usually symptoms of tiredness and weakness. Then there are also arm or leg cramps that can cause a tingling numbness, making arm or leg movement feel like a paralysis.

Other signs are stomach cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting. Then there is constipation, heart palpitations, passing urine too often or feeling thirsty all the time. Low blood pressure can lead to fainting and mental issues like depression, delirium, psychosis, hallucinations, irritation and confusion.

It is common to hear all about what we should eat less of. This time it is all about what you need more of to protect bones, muscles and your heart. That is POTASSIUM!

What Does Potassium Do to Us?

Relaxes blood vessels

Potassium relaxes blood vessels, this decreases the risk of a stroke and reduces blood pressure. It offsets damaging high sodium effects like salt making the blood vessels less stiff, helping sodium to excrete.

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Keeps the bones strong

Foods that are rich in potassium produce alkali, and this maintains a balance of the acid base in the body, keeping the bones strong.

Facilitates muscular functions

Muscles need potassium for contraction and communication between muscles and nerves, together with full muscular function. Muscles are everywhere in the body, the arms, the legs as well as the digestive and respiratory tracts. Meaning that a diet that is low in potassium may result in digestive troubles and fatigue.

Consume fruits and vegetables for more potassium

Let us examine the best foods to level potassium intake in the body. The recommended intake per day should be 4,700 milligrammes.

Fruit has a high potassium level. The banana is the most well known. Others are dried fruit, apples, peaches, and oranges, followed by almost every other kind of fruit. Try three servings a day, fresh, dried or in a juice.

Veggies have a high potassium level with leafy greens leading along with acorn squash and sweet potatoes. Other vegetables also contribute. Four servings daily will help, so two servings for afternoon and evening meals, a cup of raw and half-cooked. Beans, nuts, and lentils contain significant potassium levels.

Top 10 potassium-rich foods

Avocado: One full avocado has 1,067 milligrams

    Researchers found that people who ate avocados tend to have healthier diets overall, as well as an increased nutrient intake and are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome [1] .

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    Acorn Squash: One cupful has 896 milligrams

      Acorn squash has high levels of antioxidants that fight and prevent various types of cancer [2] including skin, lung, breast and prostate cancer.

      Spinach: One cupful of cooked spinach has 839 milligrams

        Spinach is rich in potassium and scientific research indicates it has agents that are cancer fighting [3].

        Sweet Potato: One huge potato has 855 milligrams

          Sweet potatoes are dense in nutrients and rich in potassium. They are high in vitamin C, beta-carotene, and vitamin B6. In addition, the latest research indicates that they may be helpful in treating peptic ulcers [4]) .

          Wild-Caught Salmon: 772 miligrams per half a fillet

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            It has a load of omega-3 fatty acids that decrease the risk of strokes [5] and heart disease. These reduce depression symptoms as well as joint pain, skin ailments, and high blood pressure.

            Dried Apricots: Half a cup has 756 miligrams

              Dried apricots are easy and quick to pop up potassium levels. Studies have stated [6] that people consuming dried fruits have healthier diets with more nutrients and a lower body weight. Dried apricots are a potassium-rich choice of snacks.

              Pomegranate: One full pomegranate has 667 miligrams

                Pomegranates are awesome fruits for potassium intake. They also have load of fiber, vitamin K and vitamin C, amongst various other nutrients.

                Coconut Water: One cupful has 600 miligrams

                  Coconut water is a beverage high in electrolytes like potassium. It has been used in an emergency for hydration [7].

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                  White Beans: Half a cup has 502 miligrams

                    White beans contain a significant amount of potassium per serving and are high in fiber. High-fiber diets reduce the risk [8] of diabetes.

                    Banana: One large banana has 487 miligrams

                      The most well-known potassium source is also high in carbs and sugar. A good source of energy before a workout, bananas are rich in nutrients, helps to repair muscles and balance the retention of water.

                      Featured photo credit: Mercola via articles.mercola.com

                      Reference

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                      Nena Tenacity

                      Screenwriter ∕ Filmmaker

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                      Last Updated on June 20, 2019

                      Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

                      Science Says Guitar Players’ Brains Are Different From Others’

                      There’s nothing quite like picking up a guitar and strumming out some chords. Listening to someone playing the guitar can be mesmerising, it can evoke emotion and a good guitar riff can bring out the best of a song. Many guitar players find a soothing, meditative quality to playing, along with the essence of creating music or busting out an acoustic version of their favourite song. But how does playing the guitar affect the brain?

                      More and more scientific studies have been looking into how people who play the guitar have different brain functions compared to those who don’t. What they found was quite astonishing and backed up what many guitarists may instinctively know deep down.

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                      Guitar Players’ Brains Can Synchronise

                      You didn’t read that wrong! Yes, a 2012 study[1] was conducted in Berlin that looked at the brains of guitar players. The researchers took 12 pairs of players and got them to play the same piece of music while having their brains scanned.

                      During the experiment, they found something extraordinary happening to each pair of participants – their brains were synchronising with each other. So what does this mean? Well, the neural networks found in the areas of the brain associated with social cognition and music production were most activated when the participants were playing their instruments. In other words, their ability to connect with each other while playing music was exceptionally strong.

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                      Guitar Players Have a Higher Intuition

                      Intuition is described as “the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning” and this is exactly what’s happening when two people are playing the guitar together.

                      The ability to synchronise their brains with each other, stems from this developed intuitive talent indicating that guitar players have a definite spiritual dexterity to them. Not only do their brains synchronise with another player, but they can also even anticipate what is to come before and after a set of chords without consciously knowing. This explains witnessing a certain ‘chemistry’ between players in a band and why many bands include brothers who may have an even stronger connection.

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                      This phenomenon is actually thought to be down to the way guitarists learn how to play – while many musicians learn through reading sheet music, guitar players learn more from listening to others play and feeling their way through the chords. This also shows guitarists have exceptional improvisational skills[2] and quick thinking.

                      Guitar Players Use More of Their Creative, Unconscious Brain

                      The same study carried out a different experiment, this time while solo guitarists were shredding. They found that experienced guitar players were found to deactivate the conscious part of their brain extremely easily meaning they were able to activate the unconscious, creative and less practical way of thinking more efficiently.

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                      This particular area of the brain – the right temporoparietal junction – typically deactivates with ‘long term goal orientation’ in order to stop distractions to get goals accomplished. This was in contrast to the non-guitarists who were unable to shut off the conscious part of their brain which meant they were consciously thinking more about what they were playing.

                      This isn’t to say that this unconscious way of playing can’t be learnt. Since the brain’s plasticity allows new connections to be made depending on repeated practice, the guitar player’s brain can be developed over time but it’s something about playing the guitar in particular that allows this magic to happen.

                      Conclusion

                      While we all know musicians have very quick and creative brains, it seems guitar players have that extra special something. Call it heightened intuition or even a spiritual element – either way, it’s proven that guitarists are an exceptional breed unto themselves!

                      More About Music Playing

                      Featured photo credit: Lechon Kirb via unsplash.com

                      Reference

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