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Farewell to Feeling of Powerless and Drowsiness: You Need Potassium.

Farewell to Feeling of Powerless and Drowsiness: You Need Potassium.

There are loads of reasons to ensure that you consume enough potassium daily. Firstly, potassium is key for efficient muscular tissue functionality. Potassium also maintains electrolyte and fluid balance and is the third highest mineral level in the body. It is required for the adequate functioning of the kidneys, heart, and the brain.

Potassium has a role in keeping the body hydrated and supports cellular function along with sodium. When potassium levels lower, the result will have severe effects.

The main causes of low potassium include diarrhea, dehydration and taking too many laxatives. Some medication affecting potassium levels in the in the body are ‘diuretics’, commonly known as water pills.

Low potassium symptoms are undesirable even though they may be mild or vague. These are usually symptoms of tiredness and weakness. Then there are also arm or leg cramps that can cause a tingling numbness, making arm or leg movement feel like a paralysis.

Other signs are stomach cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting. Then there is constipation, heart palpitations, passing urine too often or feeling thirsty all the time. Low blood pressure can lead to fainting and mental issues like depression, delirium, psychosis, hallucinations, irritation and confusion.

It is common to hear all about what we should eat less of. This time it is all about what you need more of to protect bones, muscles and your heart. That is POTASSIUM!

What Does Potassium Do to Us?

Relaxes blood vessels

Potassium relaxes blood vessels, this decreases the risk of a stroke and reduces blood pressure. It offsets damaging high sodium effects like salt making the blood vessels less stiff, helping sodium to excrete.

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Keeps the bones strong

Foods that are rich in potassium produce alkali, and this maintains a balance of the acid base in the body, keeping the bones strong.

Facilitates muscular functions

Muscles need potassium for contraction and communication between muscles and nerves, together with full muscular function. Muscles are everywhere in the body, the arms, the legs as well as the digestive and respiratory tracts. Meaning that a diet that is low in potassium may result in digestive troubles and fatigue.

Consume fruits and vegetables for more potassium

Let us examine the best foods to level potassium intake in the body. The recommended intake per day should be 4,700 milligrammes.

Fruit has a high potassium level. The banana is the most well known. Others are dried fruit, apples, peaches, and oranges, followed by almost every other kind of fruit. Try three servings a day, fresh, dried or in a juice.

Veggies have a high potassium level with leafy greens leading along with acorn squash and sweet potatoes. Other vegetables also contribute. Four servings daily will help, so two servings for afternoon and evening meals, a cup of raw and half-cooked. Beans, nuts, and lentils contain significant potassium levels.

Top 10 potassium-rich foods

Avocado: One full avocado has 1,067 milligrams

    Researchers found that people who ate avocados tend to have healthier diets overall, as well as an increased nutrient intake and are less likely to develop metabolic syndrome [1] .

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    Acorn Squash: One cupful has 896 milligrams

      Acorn squash has high levels of antioxidants that fight and prevent various types of cancer [2] including skin, lung, breast and prostate cancer.

      Spinach: One cupful of cooked spinach has 839 milligrams

        Spinach is rich in potassium and scientific research indicates it has agents that are cancer fighting [3].

        Sweet Potato: One huge potato has 855 milligrams

          Sweet potatoes are dense in nutrients and rich in potassium. They are high in vitamin C, beta-carotene, and vitamin B6. In addition, the latest research indicates that they may be helpful in treating peptic ulcers [4]) .

          Wild-Caught Salmon: 772 miligrams per half a fillet

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            It has a load of omega-3 fatty acids that decrease the risk of strokes [5] and heart disease. These reduce depression symptoms as well as joint pain, skin ailments, and high blood pressure.

            Dried Apricots: Half a cup has 756 miligrams

              Dried apricots are easy and quick to pop up potassium levels. Studies have stated [6] that people consuming dried fruits have healthier diets with more nutrients and a lower body weight. Dried apricots are a potassium-rich choice of snacks.

              Pomegranate: One full pomegranate has 667 miligrams

                Pomegranates are awesome fruits for potassium intake. They also have load of fiber, vitamin K and vitamin C, amongst various other nutrients.

                Coconut Water: One cupful has 600 miligrams

                  Coconut water is a beverage high in electrolytes like potassium. It has been used in an emergency for hydration [7].

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                  White Beans: Half a cup has 502 miligrams

                    White beans contain a significant amount of potassium per serving and are high in fiber. High-fiber diets reduce the risk [8] of diabetes.

                    Banana: One large banana has 487 miligrams

                      The most well-known potassium source is also high in carbs and sugar. A good source of energy before a workout, bananas are rich in nutrients, helps to repair muscles and balance the retention of water.

                      Featured photo credit: Mercola via articles.mercola.com

                      Reference

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                      Nena Tenacity

                      Screenwriter ∕ Filmmaker

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                      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                      1. Work on the small tasks.

                      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                      2. Take a break from your work desk.

                      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                      3. Upgrade yourself

                      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                      4. Talk to a friend.

                      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                      7. Read a book (or blog).

                      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                      8. Have a quick nap.

                      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                      9. Remember why you are doing this.

                      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                      10. Find some competition.

                      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                      11. Go exercise.

                      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                      12. Take a good break.

                      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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