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These 7 Foods Contain Way More Vitamin D Than You Think!

These 7 Foods Contain Way More Vitamin D Than You Think!

Vitamin D, or as it also known the “sunshine vitamin”, is very important for our health and for keeping our energy levels high. This vitamin is vital for calcium absorption and promoting bone growth. It can also help in regulating your immune system, blood pressure, weight loss and fighting depression. In addition, it can also help fight various diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and heart disease.

As its other name suggests, we get vitamin D when we are exposed to the sunlight. But what happens if you spend more time indoors or live in a place with little sunlight? Your body needs enough vitamin D, and so you need to include more vitamin D rich foods in your diet.

Why is vitamin D so important?

One of the most important functions of vitamin D is to help our bones stay strong. As National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases explains, we need vitamin D in order to absorb calcium, and without having enough vitamin D to absorb calcium, our bones become soft and fragile.[1]

Several studies confirm its multiple benefits, such as decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease,[2] improving the symptoms of depression,[3] and it even helps decrease the risk of multiple sclerosis.[4]

Studies have indicated that vitamin D deficiency may cause several serious conditions. A study published in the Neurology journal discovered that not having enough vitamin D can increase the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.[5] Another study published in Clinical Cancer Research indicates there is a link between vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer.[6]

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Which foods you should consume to get enough vitamin D?

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements gives recommendations of how much vitamin D you should take:[7]

  • Children from ages 0-12 400 IU
  • Children from ages 1-13 600 IU
  • Teenagers from ages 14-18 600 IU
  • Adults from ages 19-70 600 IU
  • Adults above the ages of 70 800 IU

We present you with the list of foods that are the great source of vitamin D that you can incorporate into your everyday diet.

1. Cod liver oil

    Cod liver oil is rich in vitamin D, and it contains and it contains 10,000 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 1,400 IU in one tablespoon (14 grams), and 500 IU per teaspoon (5 grams). Besides containing vitamin D, this oil is also rich vitamin A and Omega-3 fats.

    2. Portobello mushrooms

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      When exposed to the sunlight, Portobello mushrooms are a great source of vitamin D. In 100 grams, they contain 1,136 IU of vitamin D, 977 IU per cup (86 grams), and 954 IU in one mushroom (84 grams).

      These mushrooms also contain fibers, proteins, potassium and phosphorous. You can prepare these delicious grilled Portobello mushrooms that are both tasty and full of healthy nutrients.

      3. Trout

        Among other fish that are source of vitamin D, such as salmon and swordfish, trout is one of the fish that is very rich in this vitamin. From 100 grams, you can get 760 IU of vitamin D, or from one fillet (71 gram), you can get 540 IU.

        Beside vitamin D, you can also find vitamins B6 and B12, as well as phosphorous, potassium and selenium in trout. There are many mouth-watering trout recipes, and you can try this interesting Stuffed Rainbow Trout recipe.

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        4. Fish roe

          Fish roe contains 484 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, 136 IU in 28 grams, and 68 IU in 14 grams. It is also rich in vitamin A and Omega-3 fatty acids. If you love sushi, you can make this sushi with egg yolk, and eat a delicio us meal rich in vitamin D.

          5. Fortified whole grain cereal

            These cereal can be great way to start your day with a healthy meal, as they contain 332 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 100 IU per ¾ cup (30 grams). They also contain fibers, proteins and vitamin C.

            6. Lite firm tofu

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              Tofu contains 154 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 123 IU in 79 grams. Besides vitamin D, tofu is also rich in protein and it contains 8 essential amino acids. For healthy lunch, you can prepare Tofu and asparagus pad Thai.

              7. Hard boiled eggs

                Hard boiled eggs can be a great source of energy for your body, and also a great source of vitamin D, as they contain 88 IU in 100 grams, 120 IU per cup (136 grams), or 44 IU per egg (50 grams). Eggs are also full of other vitamins and minerals, such as iron, zinc, potassium and vitamin E.

                Deviled eggs are the perfect snack made from boiled eggs, and there are plenty recipes available, but you can start with this classic one.

                Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com/ via pixabay.com

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                Ana Erkic

                Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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                Last Updated on June 13, 2019

                5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

                5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

                Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

                You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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                1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

                It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

                Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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                2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

                If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

                3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

                If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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                4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

                A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

                5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

                If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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                Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

                Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

                Reference

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