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These 7 Foods Contain Way More Vitamin D Than You Think!

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These 7 Foods Contain Way More Vitamin D Than You Think!

Vitamin D, or as it also known the “sunshine vitamin”, is very important for our health and for keeping our energy levels high. This vitamin is vital for calcium absorption and promoting bone growth. It can also help in regulating your immune system, blood pressure, weight loss and fighting depression. In addition, it can also help fight various diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and heart disease.

As its other name suggests, we get vitamin D when we are exposed to the sunlight. But what happens if you spend more time indoors or live in a place with little sunlight? Your body needs enough vitamin D, and so you need to include more vitamin D rich foods in your diet.

Why is vitamin D so important?

One of the most important functions of vitamin D is to help our bones stay strong. As National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases explains, we need vitamin D in order to absorb calcium, and without having enough vitamin D to absorb calcium, our bones become soft and fragile.[1]

Several studies confirm its multiple benefits, such as decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease,[2] improving the symptoms of depression,[3] and it even helps decrease the risk of multiple sclerosis.[4]

Studies have indicated that vitamin D deficiency may cause several serious conditions. A study published in the Neurology journal discovered that not having enough vitamin D can increase the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.[5] Another study published in Clinical Cancer Research indicates there is a link between vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer.[6]

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Which foods you should consume to get enough vitamin D?

National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements gives recommendations of how much vitamin D you should take:[7]

  • Children from ages 0-12 400 IU
  • Children from ages 1-13 600 IU
  • Teenagers from ages 14-18 600 IU
  • Adults from ages 19-70 600 IU
  • Adults above the ages of 70 800 IU

We present you with the list of foods that are the great source of vitamin D that you can incorporate into your everyday diet.

1. Cod liver oil

    Cod liver oil is rich in vitamin D, and it contains and it contains 10,000 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 1,400 IU in one tablespoon (14 grams), and 500 IU per teaspoon (5 grams). Besides containing vitamin D, this oil is also rich vitamin A and Omega-3 fats.

    2. Portobello mushrooms

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      When exposed to the sunlight, Portobello mushrooms are a great source of vitamin D. In 100 grams, they contain 1,136 IU of vitamin D, 977 IU per cup (86 grams), and 954 IU in one mushroom (84 grams).

      These mushrooms also contain fibers, proteins, potassium and phosphorous. You can prepare these delicious grilled Portobello mushrooms that are both tasty and full of healthy nutrients.

      3. Trout

        Among other fish that are source of vitamin D, such as salmon and swordfish, trout is one of the fish that is very rich in this vitamin. From 100 grams, you can get 760 IU of vitamin D, or from one fillet (71 gram), you can get 540 IU.

        Beside vitamin D, you can also find vitamins B6 and B12, as well as phosphorous, potassium and selenium in trout. There are many mouth-watering trout recipes, and you can try this interesting Stuffed Rainbow Trout recipe.

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        4. Fish roe

          Fish roe contains 484 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, 136 IU in 28 grams, and 68 IU in 14 grams. It is also rich in vitamin A and Omega-3 fatty acids. If you love sushi, you can make this sushi with egg yolk, and eat a delicio us meal rich in vitamin D.

          5. Fortified whole grain cereal

            These cereal can be great way to start your day with a healthy meal, as they contain 332 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 100 IU per ¾ cup (30 grams). They also contain fibers, proteins and vitamin C.

            6. Lite firm tofu

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              Tofu contains 154 IU of vitamin D in 100 grams, or 123 IU in 79 grams. Besides vitamin D, tofu is also rich in protein and it contains 8 essential amino acids. For healthy lunch, you can prepare Tofu and asparagus pad Thai.

              7. Hard boiled eggs

                Hard boiled eggs can be a great source of energy for your body, and also a great source of vitamin D, as they contain 88 IU in 100 grams, 120 IU per cup (136 grams), or 44 IU per egg (50 grams). Eggs are also full of other vitamins and minerals, such as iron, zinc, potassium and vitamin E.

                Deviled eggs are the perfect snack made from boiled eggs, and there are plenty recipes available, but you can start with this classic one.

                Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com/ via pixabay.com

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                Reference

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                Ana Erkic

                Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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                Last Updated on January 27, 2022

                5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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                5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

                Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

                “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

                Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

                Food is a universal necessity.

                It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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                Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

                Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

                Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

                Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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                The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

                Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

                This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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                Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

                Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

                Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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                So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

                Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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