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Irritated by Dandruff? No Worries We Are Here To Help You!

Irritated by Dandruff? No Worries We Are Here To Help You!

Dandruff is a perfectly common condition, but it doesn’t make experiencing those little white flakes on your shoulders any less embarrassing. Even though we may know many people share our frustration with the dry flakes of skin falling onto our dark clothing in a business meeting or first date, it feels so personal in the moment, and it can be hard to ignore the way you feel.

Dandruff can be a tricky thing to deal with, as it has numerous causes. Along with the most common causes, dry skin and psoriasis, it is supposedly caused by not cleaning your scalp often enough, or cleaning it too often. To make this even more frustrating, some people say it can also be caused by simply shampooing with something your sensitive scalp doesn’t like. So how are you supposed to deal with it. And what exactly is dandruff, really?

What’s going on up there?

Part of the embarrassment of dandruff is the misunderstanding behind it; a lot of people believe that dandruff is caused by poor hygiene. But this isn’t scientifically sound. In fact, experts agree this is probably the last thing responsible for those flakes. Dandruff is a skin condition, first and foremost. It causes your scalp, and the scalps of 50% of the population, to flake off in tiny little pieces and usually comes with some itching. It’s closely linked to something called Malassezia. This is a fungus that everyone has (sorry) on their scalps and it feeds on the oils secreted by hair follicles. This can cause skin cells to shed and clump into those annoying flakes [1].

Surprisingly, dandruff doesn’t just happen on your scalp. In fact, you can get dandruff on your face. Plenty of people discover dandruff in their eyebrows, around their ears and even on their noses. Basically, if your skin produces oil, it’s at risk of producing dandruff [2].

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Regardless of where you experience it, before you run to the store to purchase dandruff shampoo, make sure you are truly experiencing dandruff, and not something else. Beverly Hills dermatologist Stuart H Kaplan, M.D. recommends a medicated dandruff shampoo that contains ketoconazole, selenium sulfide or zinc. If you don’t see any improvement after two weeks of using the ‘poo, you may want to consult a physician. You could have psoriasis or another skin inflammation.

The Causes of Dandruff.

Some studies have found diet can impact your risk for dandruff, claiming people who eat lots of salt, too much sugar or foods rich in spice can experience more dandruff than a person with a healthier diet. Excessive alcohol use can also lead to flaking skin. However, with a significant number of dandruff sufferers claiming it seems to get better as they age, the jury was out as to whether it really is caused by what you’re eating or if it’s just something we all have to experience. That is until 2007.

In 2007, scientists found that the fungal yeast responsible for dandruff produces enzymes which break down oils produced by our sweat glands. This creates an acid which penetrates the top layer of our skin and triggers cells to be created faster than usual, resulting in dandruff.

While the myths are still out there that claim dandruff is caused by poor hygiene and a lack of washing your hair, it could be that you are washing it too much.

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Not shampooing enough will only make your dandruff worse — it causes more oil and dead skin cells to accumulate on your scalp, which the yeast and fungi just continue to feed on. – Stuart H. Kaplan, M.D.

Do you brush your hair enough?

If you aren’t combing your hair regularly, you may be setting yourself up for dandruff. When you brush your hair, you’re helping your scalp shed all the dead skin. This is good! It’s when you make your scalp pull double duty that it can slough off in embarrassing flakes.

Are you sensitive?

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No matter how good that shampoo and conditioner smells, your skin may hate it. While shampooing too often can lead to dandruff, shampooing with the wrong products can also lead to extreme irritation and ultimately, dandruff.

Do you have yeast sensitivity?

People who are sensitive to yeast are at a higher risk of experiencing dandruff. Taking a probiotic can help. More on this in the next section!

What You Need To Do If You Have Dandruff?

So what now? Brush your hair more, shampoo only as needed and rule out skin conditions? It may seem like a lot to figure out. Unfortunately, you probably won’t be able to ever get rid of dandruff completely, but it can certainly be controlled. Shower regularly and comb your hair frequently. If you find dandruff on other parts of your body, you may want to use a skin brush to get rid of the dead skin effectively.

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If you are using every tip and trick you can think of but you still find yourself dealing with an itchy scalp and awful flakes, it may be time to consult your doctor. They can rule out any other skin conditions and, if necessary, discuss prescription options with you.

But if you’re like me and you love a good DIY, here are some home remedies that may be helpful in handling those flakes [3]:

  • Apple Cider Vinegar. The acidity of the vinegar can sooth dry skin and even get rid of the dandruff-causing fungus. Simply mix together equal parts ACV and water and slather it on your head. Leave it for about 30 minutes before washing off.
  • Baking Soda. Baking soda acts like a scrub and can exfoliate your scalp. This is a simple DIY, as you simply need to add a little baking soda to your shampoo and wash your hair as usual.
  • Aloe Vera. I keep this plant in my backyard; it’s good for all kinds of things! Open up the plant and squeeze the gel onto your scalp. Massage it into your hair and scalp and then wash with an anti-dandruff shampoo.
  • Coconut Oil. Of course this magical oil was going to be on my list! Put about five tablespoons of coconut oil in a container. Take a little at a time into your palms and rub until it’s clear and melted. Apply to your scalp and massage your head. Let it stay on for an hour and then wash it out with regular shampoo. If you want to reap the benefits even more, choose a shampoo with coconut oil in it!

How to prevent having Dandruff long-term.

  1. Watch what you eat. Go ahead and avoid all that gross, saturated fat. And forget about trans fats while you’re at it. Diets rich in these fats cause glands in your body to produce more oil which makes dandruff worse.
  2. Take your vitamins. Try to get plenty of fruits and veggies, especially those containing zinc and B vitamins, to keep the flakes at bay. Synthetic forms of vitamin D have been shown to slow down the growth of skin cells, while Vitamin A can help normalize the abnormal DNA happening in the body [4].
  3. Find your perfect probiotic. I’m a big believer in probiotics, because they seem to be good for just about everything your body does. Look for a supplement that claims to aid with candida overgrowth. This is a yeast your body can over-produce over time, and yeast can make dandruff worse.
  4. Try a dandruff shampoo. Look for a product that contains ketoconazole, selenium sulfide or zinc. When applying it, lather up two times and let it sit for about five minutes. The goal is to get the product to really penetrate those hair follicles and skin cells. And if you hate the smell or find it too medicinal, rinse with a little lemon juice to remove the scent.
  5. Consult a dermatologist. If your dandruff is caused by a skin condition, a dermatologist may recommend anti-inflammatory drugs.

Do you have your own methods of dealing with dandruff? Make sure to share them!

Featured photo credit: Michael Fertig via stocksnap.io

Reference

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Heather Poole

Technical writer

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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