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The Perfect Letter of Recommendation: Sincere, Positive & Affirming

The Perfect Letter of Recommendation: Sincere, Positive & Affirming
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Writing a perfect letter of recommendation can seem intimidating, especially if you have never written one. The struggle between staying honest to yourself while trying not to destroy one’s future is always challenging. You don’t want to make things up, but you are even more unwilling to write a template-like vague, dull and unconvincing letter.

Letter of recommendation can really decide one’s future. If carefully written, the letter can help someone to stand out from the crowds of talents. Otherwise, it is more like a killing letter rather than a killer letter. Here is a complete guide to help you writer a killer recommendation letter (plus useful letter of recommendation template!)

1. Apply the standard letter format to your letter of recommendation

A letter of recommendation follows the same general rules as any other professional letters.

  • Your address should be on the top right, followed by the date
  • Below your address, on the left, have the recipient’s name and address
  • Start with a formal business greeting. For example, ‘Dear Sir or Madam’

2. Start by express your passionate praise in brief

Let the potential employer of the person you are writing for know that you believed in this person right from the start. Try not to sound overzealous; you do not want them to think it is insincere.

“Any corporation should count themselves fortunate to have an employee as determined, sharp and friendly as Mark.”

3. Show how well you know the person you are writing for

Give some concrete contexts and examples for your recommendation. Inform the reader how you met them, how long you have worked together, your experience working with them and summarise your basic qualifications.

“As MD of Media Central, I was Mark’s direct supervisor from 2007 to 2011. We worked together on several key projects together as I got to know him well, as a hardworking man.”

4. Highlight the candidate’s qualifications and past achievements

Give a clear and concise description of what the person has done, in your company. Cite their greatest achievements in their assigned departments as well as team projects. Use examples, give evidence or summarise a story of their work.

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“Mark’s enthusiasm for solving problems through media combined with his grasp of media technology, polished editorial skills and team spirit, has improved our company’s productivity in the visual and print media departments.

5. Illustrate their success and what makes them stand out through comparisons

Comparisons help the recipient to have some basis to fathom why you are recommending the candidate.

“Mark’s ability to get the job done even before the deadline, keep up with technological trends and serve diversified markets has surpassed the combined efforts of other media efforts I have witnessed during my five years at XXX LTD.”

6. Cite where and how the candidate is improving without any exaggeration

Do not set expectations for the candidates that may be almost impossible to meet. Praise them without looking plausible.

“Mark is always active in seminars, summits and complementary courses as he works hard to improve technical skills in field work.”

7. Mention their good qualities outside of work

Give a basis of their participation whether it is in the company’s sports team or voluntary work.

“Mark is also an active member of the company’s football team where he performs outstandingly.”

8. Maintain action-oriented writing

Start every paragraph with an active affirmation of the candidate’s character traits or qualities.

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Replace “I have been pleased with his ongoing work” with “Mark’s skills have drastically improved in the last couple months. His selfless attitude is inspiring.”

9. Close the letter with an affirmative tone

In few words, restate your recommendation of the candidate and invite the recipient to contact you.

“For all the above reasons, I know Mark will be of great value to your company as an addition to the team. Should you have any enquiries, I invite you to contact me at the phone number and address, above.”

10. Don’t forget to sign your name!

The most important thing it to still sound professional, at the end of it all. If the recommendation letter you are writing is to be sent to a physical address, print and sign it by hand. Otherwise, type your name and sign off.

Remember, make this person look good without putting them on the pedestal. You are putting your reputation on the line for this person, make it perfect. If you aren’t completely confident that you have covered everything in your letter, ask for feedback from an associate who may also know the candidate.

And more tips from professionals to help you write an all-rounded letter of recommendation.

It’s not ending here. We still have some wise words from some professionals in the field for you. Their expertise and experience are the perfect proof of their credibility. And it is highly advisable to listen to them before starting your letter or you may accidentally step on some traps which can be avoided.

Keep the letter of recommendation brief and concise

One-page MAX. This may seem like common sense, but can be hard if you are trying to get across a lot of accomplishments or the person has an extended CV. If you can get to the heart of the matter in one page, highlighting the person, as opposed to waxing poetic about how great they are will keep it authentic. — Brandyce Stephenson, Corporate Culture Consultant[1]

Don’t be vague, list examples to demonstrate the candidate’s qualities instead

My best advice for writing an effective letter of recommendation is to focus the writing and praise on a specific project or area of work that the person completed. Rather than the vague cliches of saying that candidate X is “hard-working, attentive, and detail-oriented”, it helps to say exactly what the person did when you were working for them and what astounded you about that particular practice. Anyone can be a “conscientious worker”, but few may have the fortitude to work long hours and late nights to achieve a goal, or the ability to instantly pick up a new program online, for example. — Jake Tully, Editor In Chief TruckDrivingJobs[2]

Mention the lasting impression

Finish your letter with a statement about how you would be “happy to hire X person again”. This firmly indicates to the hirer that you parted ways on good terms. — Jamie Stone, Human Resources Consultant, Mature Dates Online[3]

Introduce yourself in the letter as well

It may not be very obvious to the reviewer who you are and why you have the standing to recommend this person. State in the letter why you have the experience to make this judgement. So, for example, I would say: “I am a professor of medicine with 25 years of experience. I have mentored hundreds of postdoctoral fellows in a top 20 medical research center. Therefore, I have extensive experience assessing the skills of applicants at this level.” — Dr. Luz Claudio, director of training programs and author of How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper: The Step-by-Step Guide[4]

Tailor the letter to the job sought

Familiarise yourself with the position so that you can tailor your letter to the specific requirements of the job. If the job heavily entails people management, make sure you mention a time when this person did a great job at that, even if it wasn’t their main responsibility. — Freda Francis, Human Resources Expert, Mums That Work[5]

Get personal and trigger emotions

People like to get their hearts tugged at a bit and if some one can stand someone enough to hire someone or have someone as a student and actually want to recommend them after the experience, they probably think they’re pretty good people. Opt for sincerity versus perfection. People dig it. — Joan Barrett, Freelance Writer, Joan Barrett Media[6]

Emphasise the great attitude of the person you are writing for

A great recommendation letter speaks to the candidate’s stellar attitude. I don’t always expect candidates to meet every requirement of the job as long as they have the basics down. But I do expect them to come with a great attitude and positive energy regarding tackling new challenges. You can train people on skills, but you can almost never train attitude. — Jeff Kear, Founder, Planning Pod[7]

With all these tips and suggestion, you are now capable to write a sound, convincing yet neat killer letter of recommendation. No worries for the possibility of killing now. And be prepared to be a favourite to write more in the coming future!

Featured photo credit: Flaticon via flaticon.com

Reference

[1] Brandyce Stephenson, Corporate Culture Consultant
[2] Jake Tully, Editor In Chief TruckDrivingJobs.com
[3] Jamie Stone, Human Resources Consultant, Mature Dates Online
[4] Dr. Luz Claudio, director of training programs and author of How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper: The Step-by-Step Guide
[5] Freda Francis, Human Resources Expert, Mums That Work
[6] Joan Barrett, Freelance Writer, Joan Barrett Media
[7] Jeff Kear, Founder, Planning Pod

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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