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The Best Jobs To Excel The Ability and Talent of introverts!

The Best Jobs To Excel The Ability and Talent of introverts!

We are not all meant to be social butterflies. For many of us the opposite holds true. The very thought of socializing can give some a serious case of clammy hands and butterflies in the stomach. However, that doesn’t mean that introverts are not good at what they do or that they don’t excel in their careers!

The fact is that introverts, if left to their own devices in their peaceful, solitary work room with limited interaction, can produce exemplary work simply because they have the ability to intensely focus on the job at hand and produce quality. Many writers, designers, and programmers are introverts who cannot thrive in socially busy environments for long.

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This difference lies in the way the brains of extroverts and introverts react to stimuli. While extroverts love “buzz” and feel energized by it, introverts start to feel overstimulated very soon. [1] The key for them is to find the best jobs that suit their core skills and personalities.

How to Land the Best Jobs for Introverts

As an introvert who prefers limited interaction with people, jobs that involve socializing are off the menu. Besides, they are unlikely to require your core strengths. The first thing you need to do before starting to send applications is to figure out what job you would truly like to do.

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Begin by writing down your qualifications and core strengths.

Match your skill set with what you most like to do. For example, you may be a writer, but reporting and talking to people to collect information may not be your cup of tea, so think about becoming a work-at-home blogger instead. This will let your work in an environment you love, and help you produce the best quality work. [2]

  • Write detailed resumes that have all the information a recruiter needs, and feel free to put down your personality type as well. We live in the day and age where aggressiveness is valued, but not by everyone. Hand out detailed resumes to recruiters that don’t leave much to be asked at the interview, and honestly tell the people who are hiring about the environment in which you work best. [3]
    If they are hiring you for highly focused work, chances are they won’t care that you are not a social butterfly.
  • Ask yourself straight up questions before accepting a job offer. You applied to the right job in the right way and are now being offered a position. Before accepting, make sure that the company you are going to be joining understands your personality and will not force you to do things that are not up your alley.
    If they have no cabins, ask yourself if you will be okay working in an open environment surrounded by people. Do they want weekly presentations that you are uncomfortable giving? Do they insist on employee social interactions, and if so, are you okay with it? Don’t accept a job thinking you will be able to adapt. Introverts find it hard to work in an environment with distractions and stimulations.
    Find a job that values you for what you are, and does not try to change you. [4]

The 6 Best Jobs Introverts May Give A Try

Usually the best jobs for introverts are the ones that provide an environment that’s relaxing which allows for the most productivity in order to maximize their skill set. [5]

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  1. Animal Care:
    Introverts frequently find that working with animals is far more relaxing than working with most humans, so this is one area in which introverts with a love for animals and nature can excel. You could be something as highly qualified as a marine biologist, an animal explorer, or a veterinarian, or something as simple as a bee keeper or a pet care giver at a pet salon or animal hospital. Think “animals” and there’s so much an introvert can do with the right qualifications, or sometimes just a general interest. [6]
  2. Field Researcher:
    Introverts thrive in environments that are undisturbed by too many nosey faces or questions. If you are introverted with a love for science, the world is your oyster. You could study to be a geologist, an astronomer, an archeologist, a lab worker, or a medical researcher. If you are science-inclined, there’s no dearth of jobs for introverts. [7]
  3. Creative Corner:
    Love art, words, or music? Then being an introvert would be a boon for you because the ability to concentrate on the job at hand can make you an excellent artist, writer, or musician. You may be great at any other such creative pursuit. [8] A creative job gives you the license to be very introverted, for it is accepted for great writers and artists to not follow the norm and be lone wolves. They are all the more respected for it. [9]
  4. Tech Junkie:
    Programming, software development, app making, game designing – the world of IT is a wonderful one for introverts because it allows their high levels of concentration and single-mindedness to produce positive and useful results. It provides them an environment free of distraction in which they can truly thrive. [10]
  5. Data Cruncher:
    There are jobs at which no one dare disturb you while you are working. Think accounting, database management, librarian, auditing, archiving, etc. [11]
  6. Some Off-road Options:
    In case you are not concerned with earning much money, are okay with just about any kind of job, and totally abhor being around people, you can also choose jobs such as long-distance heavy machine driver (think trucks, trains and trailers), embalmer or mortician (the dead don’t interact much), junkyard owner (you can make money out of trash), or court reporter (seriously, all you have to do is listen and type.)

So introverts, while the world may not be verbally appreciative of you, we hope you know that you make the world go ’round and keep its cogs well-oiled in your unobtrusive and hard-working way. [12] Keep calm, and keep working!

Featured photo credit: Quiet Rev via d1xenuxjgcz4dx.cloudfront.net

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Reference

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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