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How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer

How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer

There you are again – scouring listings, submitting your resume for the nth time, and sending follow ups in hopes of grabbing your next job. You may land an interview or two, but they most likely ended with the dreaded words: “we’ll be in touch.”

Nobody likes to play the waiting game, especially when it comes to job hunting. With the corporate world growing more competitive each day, jobseekers need to be extra creative to get noticed by potential employers. Some invest in an online portfolio [1] to highlight their skills, positive qualities, and experience. Others, on the other hand, focus on spicing up their resumes to make a solid first impression.

Going Visual with Your Resume

Let’s face it, the best employers probably receive mountains of resumes each day. You simply can’t afford to send something that looks generic, plain, and straight up uninspiring. But with an infographic resume, you will—at the very least—intrigue them enough to view your entire application from start to finish.

An infographic utilizes visual elements such as charts and graphical lists to make information more digestible for readers. And believe it or not, you don’t need to be a professional designer to create a stunning infographic resume. Here’s how:

1. Start with a Killer Infographic Idea

The best accomplishments always start with a brilliant idea. Before you create your infographic resume, you must first understand the different types of data visualizations [2] and how they work. Charts, for example, is a great way to represent measurable data whereas timelines are useful for understanding the history behind any particular topic.

Of course, you’re free to utilize multiple visualizations in your infographic resume. For example, you can kick off with a timeline that highlights your educational background and work experience. Once you’ve grabbed the employer’s attention, follow up with a graphical anatomy that breaks down your skills, strengths, and hobbies. And to seal the deal, create a simple comparison between you and the average employee in your field.

Just remember that cluttering too much visualizations in one infographic may confuse prospective employers. To make sure it flows and reads naturally, use a long-scrolling format to show one data visualization at a time. This will also make your infographic more readable in mobile displays.

Here’s an example on how to creatively organize visualizations in your infographic resume – featuring Hollywood’s Ashton Kutcher:

    Infographic Source [3]

    2. Select a Color Scheme

    After choosing the data visualization types to represent the information in your resume, the next step is to pick a color scheme to ensure cohesive design. Apart from your creative flair, you also need a bit of psychology to give employers the right impression.

    Take note that certain colors can inspire different emotions such as trust, warmth, optimism, and relaxation. Although it’s tempting to use your favorite color, remember that your resume isn’t for you – it’s for your potential employers.

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    Below are what popular colors can instill into your personal brand:

    Red

    • Intense

    • Passionate

    • Impulsive

    Yellow

    • Approachable

    • Cheerful

    • Optimistic

    • Youthful

    Blue

    • Trustworthy

    • Productive

    • Calm

    • Sincere

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    Orange

    • Enthusiastic

    • Cautious

    • Aggressive

    • Confident

    Green

    • Relaxed

    • Financial-savvy

    • Environmentally aware

    Purple

    • Success-driven

    • Imaginative

    • Creative

    Below is a simple infographic to put everything in perspective:

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      Infographic source [4]

      3. Get to Know Your Tools

      It’s nearly time to give your resume that much-needed makeover. But before you get your hands dirty, you must first get to know the tools you need to use. The obvious choice is Adobe Photoshop [5], which has all the firepower you need to create professional graphics for all purposes. But apart from its price, it also has a steep learning curve.

      The quickest way to learn Photoshop is to browse for online tutorials [6]and various learning resources. If you want a simpler alternative, however, then Canva [7]can provide you with plenty of built-in resources specifically designed for infographics and resumes. You can get started by heading over to their site and registering for a free account.

      Here is a closer look on how Canva works:

      After signing up, click the More button located in the upper right corner of the main dashboard. From there, scroll down and select Resume or Infographic. The resume option is more straightforward, but choosing an infographic template gives you more flexibility.

        You can breeze through the design process by selecting a premade layout. Simply click on the Layouts tab from the left panel to start editing your infographic’s content.

          To customize your design, you can insert additional elements such as icons, grids, charts, and photos from the Elements tab. You can take advantage of the platform’s drag-and-drop interface to quickly add, edit, and adjust elements as you go.

            You can also edit the finer details of your design such as text alignment, fonts, and spacing. For further personalization, you can upload your own background, photos, and other self-made assets.

            If you think Canva isn’t a great fit for your needs, you can also consider other alternatives like Visual.ly. These platforms have similar features, so it should be easy to pick them up in the soonest possible time.

            4. Highlight Your References and Certifications

            All employers need to answer one question before finalizing a new hire: are you trustworthy? Sure, you probably have a fancy resume and some artistic skills. But at the end of the day, resumes and interviews are only meant to boost your employer’s confidence in bringing you onboard.

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            Fortunately, infographics make it easy to show off your certifications, accolades, and noteworthy achievements through logos. And as icing on the cake, try to include testimonials or commendations from previous employers, university professors, and other references. Of course, you just need to secure their permission to use their words, name, and basic information.

            Below is an example on how testimonials can fit into infographics:

              Infographic source [8]

              5. Do It the Easy Way

              Creating an infographic resume DIY-style can be attainable, but it sure is time-consuming. If you want to avoid the hassle and complexity involved with creating infographic resumes, consider hiring a freelancer or professional infographic design agency [9].

              Once you do get the job, then you should be free to experiment with your own design skills. Keep in mind that infographics are not only useful for resumes, they can also spice up your reporting, brand management, and social media skills. Here’s an infographic that fully explores all the possibilities:

                Infographic source [10]

                Final Words

                Finally, remember that there are no rules when it comes to getting ahead. You need to leverage all the tools you can lay your hands on if you really want your personal brand to stand out. Visualize your resume, build an online portfolio, attend more seminars – the only limit is your own willingness to go the extra mile.

                Good luck on your next job interview!

                Reference

                More by this author

                Vikas Agrawal

                Vikas is the co-founder of Infobrandz, an Infographic design agency that offers creative visual content solutions to medium to large companies.

                What Are Analytical Skills (And How to Strengthen Them For Success) How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer How I Get Things Done with Only Half of the Time Others Need Writing a Great Value Statement Can Bring In Tons of Money for Your Business All-Natural Tips for Fighting Insomnia and Sleeping Better

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                Last Updated on February 11, 2021

                20 Amazing Facts About Dreams that You Might Not Know About

                20 Amazing Facts About Dreams that You Might Not Know About

                Dreams — Mysterious, bewildering, eye-opening and sometimes a nightmarish living hell. Dreams are all that and much more.

                Here are 20 amazing facts about dreams that you might have never heard about:

                Fact #1: You can’t read while dreaming, or tell the time

                  If you are unsure whether you are dreaming or not, try reading something. The vast majority of people are incapable of reading in their dreams.

                  The same goes for clocks: each time you look at a clock it will tell a different time and the hands on the clock won’t appear to be moving as reported by lucid dreamers.

                  Fact #2: Lucid dreaming

                  There is a whole subculture of people practicing what is called lucid or conscious dreaming. Using various techniques, these people have supposedly learned to assume control of their dreams and do amazing things like flying, passing through walls, and traveling to different dimensions or even back in time.

                  Want to learn how to control your dreams? You can try these tips:

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                  Lucid Dreaming: This Is How You Can Control Your Dreams

                  Fact #3: Inventions inspired by dreams

                  Dreams are responsible for many of the greatest inventions of mankind. A few examples include:

                  • The idea for Google -Larry Page
                  • Alternating current generator -Tesla
                  • DNA’s double helix spiral form -James Watson
                  • The sewing machine -Elias Howe
                  • Periodic table -Dimitri Mendeleyev

                  …and many, many more.

                  Fact #4: Premonition dreams

                  There are some astounding cases where people actually dreamt about things which happened to them later, in the exact same ways they dreamed about.

                  You could say they got a glimpse of the future, or it might have just been coincidence. The fact remains that this is some seriously interesting and bizarre phenomena. Some of the most famous premonition dreams include:

                  • Abraham Lincoln dreamt of His Assassination
                  • Many of the victims of 9/11 had dreams warning them about the catastrophe
                  • Mark Twain’s dream of his brother’s demise
                  • 19 verified precognitive dreams about the Titanic catastrophe

                  Fact #5: Sleep paralysis

                  Hell is real and it is called sleep paralysis. It’s the stuff of true nightmares. I’ve been a sleep paralysis sufferer as a kid and I can attest to how truly horrible it is.

                  Two characteristics of sleep paralysis are the inability to move (hence paralysis) and a sense of an extremely evil presence in the room with you. It doesn’t feel like a dream, but 100% real. Studies show that during an attack, sleep paralysis sufferers show an overwhelming amygdala activity. The amygdala is responsible for the “fight or flight” instinct and the emotions of fear, terror and anxiety. Enough said!

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                  Fact #6: REM sleep disorder

                  In the state of REM (rapid-eye-movement) stage of your sleep your body is normally paralyzed. In rare cases, however, people act out their dreams. These have resulted in broken arms, legs, broken furniture, and in at least one reported case, a house burnt down.

                  Fact #7: Sexual dreams

                  The very scientifically-named “nocturnal penile tumescence” is a very well documented phenomena. In laymen’s term, it simply means that you get a stiffy while you sleep. Actually, studies indicate that men get up to 20 erections per dream.

                  Fact #8: Unbelievable sleepwalkers

                    Sleepwalking is a very rare and potentially dangerous sleep disorder. It is an extreme form of REM sleep disorder, and these people don’t just act out their dreams, but go on real adventures at night.

                    Lee Hadwin is a nurse by profession, but in his dreams he is an artist. Literally. He “sleepdraws” gorgeous portraits, of which he has no recollection afterwards. Strange sleepwalking “adventures” include:

                    • A woman having sex with strangers while sleepwalking
                    • A man who drove 22 miles and killed his cousin while sleepwalking
                    • A sleepwalker who walked out of the window from the third floor, and barely survived

                    Fact #9: Dream drug

                    There are actually people who like dreaming and dreams so much that they never want to wake up. They want to continue on dreaming even during the day, so they take an illegal and extremely potent hallucinogenic drug called Dimethyltryptamine. It is actually only an isolated and synthetic form of the chemical our brains produce naturally during dreaming.

                    Fact #10 Dream-catcher

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                      The dream-catcher is one of the most well-known Native American symbols. It is a loose web or webs woven around a hoop and decorated with sacred objects meant to protect against nightmares.

                      Fact #11: Increased brain activity

                      You would associate sleeping with peace and quiet, but actually our brains are more active during sleep than during the day.

                      Fact #12: Creativity and dreams

                      As we mentioned before, dreams are responsible for inventions, great artworks and are generally just incredibly interesting. They are also “recharging” our creativity.

                      Scientists also say that keeping a dream diary helps with creativity.

                      In rare cases of REM disorder, people actually don’t dream at all. These people suffer from significantly decreased creativity and perform badly at tasks requiring creative problem solving.

                      Fact #13: Pets dream too

                        Our animal companions dream as well. Watch a dog or a cat sleep and you can see that they are moving their paws and making noises like they were chasing something. Go get ’em buddy!

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                        Fact #14: You always dream—you just don’t remember it

                        Many people claim that they don’t dream at all, but that’s not true: we all dream, but up to 60% of people don’t remember their dreams at all.

                        Fact #15: Blind people dream too

                        Blind people who were not born blind see images in their dreams but people who were born blind don’t see anything at all. They still dream, and their dreams are just as intense and interesting, but they involve the other senses beside sight.

                        Fact #16: In your dreams, you only see faces that you already know

                          It is proven that in dreams, we can only see faces that we have seen in real life before. So beware: that scary-looking old lady next to you on the bus might as well be in your next nightmare.

                          Fact #17: Dreams tend to be negative

                          Surprisingly, dreams are more often negative than positive. The three most widely reported emotions felt during dreaming are anger, sadness and fear.

                          Fact #18: Multiple dreams per night

                          You can have up to seven different dreams per night depending on how many REM cycles you have. We only dream during the REM period of sleep, and the average person dreams one to two hours every night.

                          Fact #19: Gender differences

                          Interestingly, 70% of all the characters in a man’s dream are other men, but women’s dream contain an equal amount of women and men. Also men’s dreams contain a lot more aggression. Both women and men dream about sexual themes equally often.

                          Fact #20: Not everyone dreams in color

                          As much as 12% of people only dream in black and white.

                          Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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