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How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer

How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer

There you are again – scouring listings, submitting your resume for the nth time, and sending follow ups in hopes of grabbing your next job. You may land an interview or two, but they most likely ended with the dreaded words: “we’ll be in touch.”

Nobody likes to play the waiting game, especially when it comes to job hunting. With the corporate world growing more competitive each day, jobseekers need to be extra creative to get noticed by potential employers. Some invest in an online portfolio [1] to highlight their skills, positive qualities, and experience. Others, on the other hand, focus on spicing up their resumes to make a solid first impression.

Going Visual with Your Resume

Let’s face it, the best employers probably receive mountains of resumes each day. You simply can’t afford to send something that looks generic, plain, and straight up uninspiring. But with an infographic resume, you will—at the very least—intrigue them enough to view your entire application from start to finish.

An infographic utilizes visual elements such as charts and graphical lists to make information more digestible for readers. And believe it or not, you don’t need to be a professional designer to create a stunning infographic resume. Here’s how:

1. Start with a Killer Infographic Idea

The best accomplishments always start with a brilliant idea. Before you create your infographic resume, you must first understand the different types of data visualizations [2] and how they work. Charts, for example, is a great way to represent measurable data whereas timelines are useful for understanding the history behind any particular topic.

Of course, you’re free to utilize multiple visualizations in your infographic resume. For example, you can kick off with a timeline that highlights your educational background and work experience. Once you’ve grabbed the employer’s attention, follow up with a graphical anatomy that breaks down your skills, strengths, and hobbies. And to seal the deal, create a simple comparison between you and the average employee in your field.

Just remember that cluttering too much visualizations in one infographic may confuse prospective employers. To make sure it flows and reads naturally, use a long-scrolling format to show one data visualization at a time. This will also make your infographic more readable in mobile displays.

Here’s an example on how to creatively organize visualizations in your infographic resume – featuring Hollywood’s Ashton Kutcher:

    Infographic Source [3]

    2. Select a Color Scheme

    After choosing the data visualization types to represent the information in your resume, the next step is to pick a color scheme to ensure cohesive design. Apart from your creative flair, you also need a bit of psychology to give employers the right impression.

    Take note that certain colors can inspire different emotions such as trust, warmth, optimism, and relaxation. Although it’s tempting to use your favorite color, remember that your resume isn’t for you – it’s for your potential employers.

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    Below are what popular colors can instill into your personal brand:

    Red

    • Intense

    • Passionate

    • Impulsive

    Yellow

    • Approachable

    • Cheerful

    • Optimistic

    • Youthful

    Blue

    • Trustworthy

    • Productive

    • Calm

    • Sincere

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    Orange

    • Enthusiastic

    • Cautious

    • Aggressive

    • Confident

    Green

    • Relaxed

    • Financial-savvy

    • Environmentally aware

    Purple

    • Success-driven

    • Imaginative

    • Creative

    Below is a simple infographic to put everything in perspective:

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      Infographic source [4]

      3. Get to Know Your Tools

      It’s nearly time to give your resume that much-needed makeover. But before you get your hands dirty, you must first get to know the tools you need to use. The obvious choice is Adobe Photoshop [5], which has all the firepower you need to create professional graphics for all purposes. But apart from its price, it also has a steep learning curve.

      The quickest way to learn Photoshop is to browse for online tutorials [6]and various learning resources. If you want a simpler alternative, however, then Canva [7]can provide you with plenty of built-in resources specifically designed for infographics and resumes. You can get started by heading over to their site and registering for a free account.

      Here is a closer look on how Canva works:

      After signing up, click the More button located in the upper right corner of the main dashboard. From there, scroll down and select Resume or Infographic. The resume option is more straightforward, but choosing an infographic template gives you more flexibility.

        You can breeze through the design process by selecting a premade layout. Simply click on the Layouts tab from the left panel to start editing your infographic’s content.

          To customize your design, you can insert additional elements such as icons, grids, charts, and photos from the Elements tab. You can take advantage of the platform’s drag-and-drop interface to quickly add, edit, and adjust elements as you go.

            You can also edit the finer details of your design such as text alignment, fonts, and spacing. For further personalization, you can upload your own background, photos, and other self-made assets.

            If you think Canva isn’t a great fit for your needs, you can also consider other alternatives like Visual.ly. These platforms have similar features, so it should be easy to pick them up in the soonest possible time.

            4. Highlight Your References and Certifications

            All employers need to answer one question before finalizing a new hire: are you trustworthy? Sure, you probably have a fancy resume and some artistic skills. But at the end of the day, resumes and interviews are only meant to boost your employer’s confidence in bringing you onboard.

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            Fortunately, infographics make it easy to show off your certifications, accolades, and noteworthy achievements through logos. And as icing on the cake, try to include testimonials or commendations from previous employers, university professors, and other references. Of course, you just need to secure their permission to use their words, name, and basic information.

            Below is an example on how testimonials can fit into infographics:

              Infographic source [8]

              5. Do It the Easy Way

              Creating an infographic resume DIY-style can be attainable, but it sure is time-consuming. If you want to avoid the hassle and complexity involved with creating infographic resumes, consider hiring a freelancer or professional infographic design agency [9].

              Once you do get the job, then you should be free to experiment with your own design skills. Keep in mind that infographics are not only useful for resumes, they can also spice up your reporting, brand management, and social media skills. Here’s an infographic that fully explores all the possibilities:

                Infographic source [10]

                Final Words

                Finally, remember that there are no rules when it comes to getting ahead. You need to leverage all the tools you can lay your hands on if you really want your personal brand to stand out. Visualize your resume, build an online portfolio, attend more seminars – the only limit is your own willingness to go the extra mile.

                Good luck on your next job interview!

                Reference

                More by this author

                Vikas Agrawal

                Vikas is the co-founder of Infobrandz, an Infographic design agency that offers creative visual content solutions to medium to large companies.

                What Are Analytical Skills (And How to Strengthen Them For Success) How to Create an Infographic Resume That Will Impress Your Future Employer How I Get Things Done with Only Half of the Time Others Need Writing a Great Value Statement Can Bring In Tons of Money for Your Business All-Natural Tips for Fighting Insomnia and Sleeping Better

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                Published on October 30, 2020

                11 Essential Philosophy Books That Will Open Your Mind

                11 Essential Philosophy Books That Will Open Your Mind

                There are numerous ways to build your mindset, but none are as profound as reading philosophy books. Through these books, some of the greatest minds around ask questions and delve deep into thought.

                While there isn’t always a clear and distinct answer to the many questions of philosophy, the entire field is a gateway to a higher sense of self. It gets you to think about all manner of things.

                Below, we cover some of the essential philosophy books that are best for those who are just starting or looking to expand their mind.

                How To Choose a Good Philosophy Book

                Before getting to this list, we’ve researched ideal philosophy books to help you expand your mind.

                We’ve found that the best philosophy books excel in the following criteria:

                • Complexity – Philosophy isn’t a subject that you can’t dive into immediately and understand everything. The books that we selected are great for people making the first leap.
                • Viewpoint – With philosophy, in particular, the author’s views are more important than in your standard book. We want to ensure the viewpoints and thoughts being discussed still hold up to this day.
                • Open-mindedness – Philosophy is all about asking perplexing questions and unraveling the answer. You might not reach a conclusion in the end, but these books are designed to get you to think.
                • Culture – The last criterion is culture. A lot of these books come from early philosophers from centuries ago or possibly from recent years. These philosophy books should paint a picture of the culture.

                1. Meditations

                  One that you’ll find on many of these types of lists is Meditations and for good reason. It’s the only document of its kind to ever be made. The book focuses on the private thoughts of the world’s most powerful man who advises himself revolving around making good on his responsibilities and the obligations of his position.

                  We know enough about Marcus Aurelius to know that he was trained in stoic philosophy and practiced every night on a series of spirituality exercises. These exercises were designed to make him humble, patient, empathetic, generous, and strong in the face of whatever problem he had to face off. And he faced plenty of problems since he was basically the emperor of roughly a third of the planet.

                  All of that is poured into this book, and you are bound to remember a line or more that will be applicable in your life. It’s a philosophy book staple.

                  Buy Meditations here.

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                  2. Letters From a Stoic

                    Similar to Marcus Aurelius, Seneca was another powerful man in Rome. He was a brilliant writer at the time and was the kind of guy to give great advice to his most trusted friends. Fortunately, much of his advice comes in letters, and those letters happen to be in this book. The letters themselves provided advice on dealing with grief, wealth, poverty, success, failure, education, and more.

                    While Seneca was a stoic, he has a more practical approach and has borrowed from other schools of thought for his advice. As he said when he was alive, “I don’t care about the author if the line is good.” Similar to Meditations, there are several brilliant lines and advice that are still relevant to this day.

                    Buy “Letters From a Stoic” here.

                    3. Nicomachean Ethics

                      Aristotle was a famous Greek philosopher at the time with profound knowledge. He’s named after a form of logic as well called Aristotelian logic. Through this book, Aristotle writes about the root of all Aristotelian ethics. In other words, this book contains the moral ideas that form a base for pretty much all of western civilization.

                      Buy “Nicomachean Ethics” here.

                      4. Beyond Good & Evil

                        Friedrich Nietzsche played a big role in the philosophical world. He was one of the leading philosophers of the existential movement, and it all came through this particular book. He is a brilliant mind. However, the issue with a lot of his work is that it’s all written in German.

                        Fortunately, this book is one of the slightly more accessible ones since it’s translated. Within the book, he breaks down the paradoxes of conventional understandings of morality. By doing this, he sets the stage for a lot of the 20th-century thought process that followed.

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                        Buy “Beyond Good & Evil” here.

                        5. Meditations on First Philosophy

                          In Meditations on First Philosophy, René Descartes breaks his book down into six meditations. The book takes a journalistic style that is structured much like a six-day course of meditation. On day one, he gives instructions on discarding all belief in things that are not guaranteed. After that, he tries to establish what can be known for sure. Similar to Meditations, this is a staple and influential philosophical text that you can pick up.

                          Buy “Meditations on First Philosophy” here.

                          6. Ethics

                            Written by Benedict de Spinoza, this came at a time during the Age of Enlightenment. Enlightenment was a movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries and with that, many schools of thought emerged and were presented through books.

                            Out of the many influential philosophy books published back then, Ethics dominated during this period as it discussed the basis of rationalism. Even though we’ve developed further beyond that, Ethics can introduce new ways of thinking from this particular school of thought.

                            Buy “Ethics” here.

                            7. Critique of Pure Reason

                              Immanuel Kant is another great philosopher who brought together two of history’s biggest opposing schools of thought into a single book. Those schools being rational thought and empirical experiential knowledge—knowledge gained through experience.

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                              In Critique of Pure Reason, Kant explores human reason and then works to establish its illusions and get down to core constituents. Overall, you can learn more about human behavior and thought processes and thus, open your mind more to how you think and process everything around you.

                              Buy “Critique of Pure Reason” here.

                              8. On the Genealogy of Morals

                                Another piece of work from Nietzsche that is accessible to us is On the Genealogy of Morals. According to Nietzsche, the purpose of this book is to call attention to his previous writings. That said, it does more than that so you don’t need to worry so much about reading his other books.

                                In this book, he expands on the cryptic aphorisms that he brings up in Beyond Good and Evil and offers a discussion or morality in a work that is more accessible than a lot of his previous work.

                                Buy “On the Genealogy of Morals” here.

                                9. Everything Is F*cked

                                  The only book on this list that’s been written in the past few years, this book by Mark Manson aims to explain why we all need hope while also accepting that hope can often lead us to ruin too.

                                  While many of the books on this list are all practical, this one is the most realistic one since not even the greatest of philosophical minds could predict things like technology, Twitter, and how our political world has shaped.

                                  Manson delivers a profound book that taps into the minds of our ancestral philosophers, such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Tom Waits, and digs deep into various topics and how all of it is connected—religion and politics, our relationship with money, entertainment, and the internet.

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                                  Overall, this book serves as a challenge to all of us—a challenge to be more honest with ourselves and connect with the world in a way we’ve never tried before.

                                  Buy “Everything Is F*cked” here.

                                  10. Reasons and Persons

                                    One of the most challenging philosophy books to read on this list, Reasons and Persons will send you on quite the trip. Through a lot of painstaking logic, Derek Parfit shows us some unique perspectives on self-interest, personhood, and whether our actions are good or evil.

                                    Considered by many to be an important psychological text around the 20th century, the arguments made about those topics will open your mind to a brand new way of thinking.

                                    Buy “Reasons and Persons” here.

                                    11. The Republic of Plato

                                      Written by Plato himself, this book is the origin of political science and offers a brilliant critique of government. As you would expect, the critique is still important today. If you’re looking to understand the inner thoughts of Plato, this is one of the best books around.

                                      Buy “The Republic of Plato” here.

                                      Final Thoughts

                                      Philosophy books take a while to digest as they provide profound knowledge and leave you with many questions. With many of these philosophy books, you need to take your time with them, and you might have to read through them a few times as well. And with every read, your mind will only expand.

                                      More Books to Open Your Mind

                                      Featured photo credit: Laura Chouette via unsplash.com

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