Advertising

You Can Finish Your Workweeks On Thursday By Doing These 6 Things

Advertising
You Can Finish Your Workweeks On Thursday By Doing These 6 Things

Do you ever feel like your workweek always drags on while the weekend zips by before you know it? It’s a cruel kind of torture. And it never seems to end.What if there was a way to change the structure of your workweek so that your week flew by and all the hard work was done by Thursday?

Even though we wish we could have every Friday off, wouldn’t it be nice to use your Fridays as a “bonus” day to tackle bigger assignments (that you never have time to get around to) and get a head start on next week?

Yes, it’s seriously doable. Yes, many successful people and companies already use flexible workweeks.[1] And yes, you can do it too if you use your time wisely.

Advertising

1. Start with the most important tasks

Start your day by spending the first 90 minutes on your most important task.[2] According to research,[3] the human body functions on cycles called ultradian rhythms. This term refers to 90-120 minute brain cycles that take place when we’re both awake and asleep. This rhythm determines when our body and brain are most energized and when we need some down time. Even if you don’t feel like it, your brain is most active in the morning. This is the best time to do your best and most important work!

2. Setting time boxes increases productivity

Setting a time box for every task we do can help us be more efficient and get more accomplished.[4] Timeboxing assigns a fixed time period to a particular task, increasing productivity. Break down your tasks into 30 minute or hour-long increments. Have a larger task that can’t be completed in a short time period? Break that big boy down into smaller tasks that can be completed in manageable time boxes.

Once you’ve mastered putting each task into a time box throughout your day, increase your productivity even further by shrinking your time boxes! Shoot to complete your task in a shorter time period by shrinking the box by 10% or 20%.

Advertising

The trick to successful timeboxing is to work on that task until the deadline for that duty ends. Then, it’s time to move onto the next item on your list. When you set a tight deadline for each different task throughout your day, it motivates you to raise your productivity level and get your work done.

3. Pinpoint three most important tasks

Rather than rattling off a long to-do list of tasks you need to get done for the day, pinpoint the three most important things you need to focus on.[5] Having a long to-do list isn’t a measure of success, especially if you can’t complete the most important tasks on the list. Put these assignments on your calendar so you remember the high-points for each day.

By highlighting the three most important missions every day, you’ll accomplish what matters most on your list. This improves your ability to prioritize. When top priorities are achieved, productivity is accomplished, and your workweek just got shorter.

Advertising

4. Find shortcuts to save time

Highly productive people find shortcuts to save time.[6] Now, just be clear, a “shortcut” doesn’t mean sloppy work. We’re talking about time-saving methods for repetitive tasks. There are probably a thousand different ways to save time, but there are a few tried and proven methods that always work. Take a look at your daily routine and pinpoint places where you’re spending a lot of useless time doing repeated tasks.

  • Keep a basic template for repeated emails or documents
  • Let technology do the work for you by scheduling simple daily tasks
  • Generate checklists to streamline work

Even if you make small changes, anything that saves you 10 to 15 minute per day adds up. That’s extra time you can use to be more productive in other areas, all part of the plan to shorten your workload which shortens your workweek.

5. Write a stop doing list

To be more productive, write a stop doing list.[7] What are you going to stop doing that is going to make you successful and more productive? Sometimes, it’s as simple as reducing your time spent doing useless tasks like checking facebook (some studies show that most people spend about 50 minutes every day!)[8]

Advertising

If you can take 30 to 60 minutes every day and make it a point to stop doing unproductive tasks, that time adds up to 2-4 hours for a four day workweek. That’s almost half a workday!

6. Post-work routines make you sharper

Have a post-work routine can help you relax and become even sharper the next day.[9] By utilizing a routine after you clock out for the day, you’re giving your body and brain the chance to refocus and regenerate. It’s important for your post-work routine to include some sort of physical activity that involves mental focus like working out, playing your favorite sport, or even playing a game of ping pong or pool.

Doing this type of activity allows your body to relax and destress. Unwinding from the work-day may seem like a waste of time. But by relaxing and taking a mental break, you’re setting yourself up for sharper focus and productivity for your next work day.

Advertising

Even though these changes might seem insignificant, they really add up. Additionally, putting in longer hours doesn’t always result in more work getting done. After so many hours, our brain shuts down and our ability to work efficiently goes down the drain.In the end, there’s no better way to start your weekend than knowing you dominated your week. Use Monday through Thursday to accomplish your weekly workload, and use Friday to tackle big projects and get a head start on next week. Even if your employer doesn’t support a shortened work week, there’s nothing stopping you from upping your performance and setting yourself up for success.

Reference

More by this author

Amanda Lindsey

A registered nurse and a mom who loves to share health resources to help others.

Kettlebell Exercises: Benefits And 8 Effective Workouts 7 Resistance Band Exercises You Can Try at Home for a Perfect Body Shape How to Resist Every Temptation and Be a Winner in Life You Can Finish Your Workweeks On Thursday By Doing These 6 Things You Can Easily Become A Knowledgeable Person (With This Learning Approach)

Trending in Productivity

1 How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness 2 Are You Addicted to Productivity? 3 Is Avoiding Difficult Tasks And Doing Easy Tasks First Less Productive? 4 How Remote Work Affects Your Productivity And Wellbeing (Backed By Data) 5 10 Best Productivity Planners To Get More Done in 2021

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on October 21, 2021

How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

Advertising
How to Create Your Own Ritual to Conquer Time Wasters and Laziness

Life is wasted in the in-between times. The time between when your alarm first rings and when you finally decide to get out of bed. The time between when you sit at your desk and when productive work begins. The time between making a decision and doing something about it.

Slowly, your day is whittled away from all the unused in-between moments. Eventually, time wasters, laziness, and procrastination get the better of you.

The solution to reclaim these lost middle moments is by creating rituals. Every culture on earth uses rituals to transfer information and encode behaviors that are deemed important. Personal rituals can help you build a better pattern for handling everything from how you wake up to how you work.

Unfortunately, when most people see rituals, they see pointless superstitions. Indeed, many rituals are based on a primitive understanding of the world. But by building personal rituals, you get to encode the behaviors you feel are important and cut out the wasted middle moments.

Advertising

Program Your Own Algorithms

Another way of viewing rituals is by seeing them as computer algorithms. An algorithm is a set of instructions that is repeated to get a result.

Some algorithms are highly efficient, sorting or searching millions of pieces of data in a few seconds. Other algorithms are bulky and awkward, taking hours to do the same task.

By forming rituals, you are building algorithms for your behavior. Take the delayed and painful pattern of waking up, debating whether to sleep in for another two minutes, hitting the snooze button, repeat until almost late for work. This could be reprogrammed to get out of bed immediately, without debating your decision.

How to Form a Ritual

I’ve set up personal rituals for myself for handling e-mail, waking up each morning, writing articles, and reading books. Far from making me inflexible, these rituals give me a useful default pattern that works best 99% of the time. Whenever my current ritual won’t work, I’m always free to stop using it.

Advertising

Forming a ritual isn’t too difficult, and the same principles for changing habits apply:

  1. Write out your sequence of behavior. I suggest starting with a simple ritual of only 3-4 steps maximum. Wait until you’ve established a ritual before you try to add new steps.
  2. Commit to following your ritual for thirty days. This step will take the idea and condition it into your nervous system as a habit.
  3. Define a clear trigger. When does your ritual start? A ritual to wake up is easy—the sound of your alarm clock will work. As for what triggers you to go to the gym, read a book or answer e-mail—you’ll have to decide.
  4. Tweak the Pattern. Your algorithm probably won’t be perfectly efficient the first time. Making a few tweaks after the first 30-day trial can make your ritual more useful.

Ways to Use a Ritual

Based on the above ideas, here are some ways you could implement your own rituals:

1. Waking Up

Set up a morning ritual for when you wake up and the next few things you do immediately afterward. To combat the grogginess after immediately waking up, my solution is to do a few pushups right after getting out of bed. After that, I sneak in ninety minutes of reading before getting ready for morning classes.

2. Web Usage

How often do you answer e-mail, look at Google Reader, or check Facebook each day? I found by taking all my daily internet needs and compressing them into one, highly-efficient ritual, I was able to cut off 75% of my web time without losing any communication.

Advertising

3. Reading

How much time do you get to read books? If your library isn’t as large as you’d like, you might want to consider the rituals you use for reading. Programming a few steps to trigger yourself to read instead of watching television or during a break in your day can chew through dozens of books each year.

4. Friendliness

Rituals can also help with communication. Set up a ritual of starting a conversation when you have opportunities to meet people.

5. Working

One of the hardest barriers when overcoming procrastination is building up a concentrated flow. Building those steps into a ritual can allow you to quickly start working or continue working after an interruption.

6. Going to the gym

If exercising is a struggle, encoding a ritual can remove a lot of the difficulty. Set up a quick ritual for going to exercise right after work or when you wake up.

Advertising

7. Exercise

Even within your workouts, you can have rituals. Spacing the time between runs or reps with a certain number of breaths can remove the guesswork. Forming a ritual of doing certain exercises in a particular order can save time.

8. Sleeping

Form a calming ritual in the last 30-60 minutes of your day before you go to bed. This will help slow yourself down and make falling asleep much easier. Especially if you plan to get up full of energy in the morning, it will help if you remove insomnia.

8. Weekly Reviews

The weekly review is a big part of the GTD system. By making a simple ritual checklist for my weekly review, I can get the most out of this exercise in less time. Originally, I did holistic reviews where I wrote my thoughts on the week and progress as a whole. Now, I narrow my focus toward specific plans, ideas, and measurements.

Final Thoughts

We all want to be productive. But time wasters, procrastination, and laziness sometimes get the better of us. If you’re facing such difficulties, don’t be afraid to make use of these rituals to help you conquer them.

Advertising

More Tips to Conquer Time Wasters and Procrastination

 

Featured photo credit: RODOLFO BARRETO via unsplash.com

Read Next