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2 Things You Must Do If You Love Someone Suffering From Addiction

2 Things You Must Do If You Love Someone Suffering From Addiction

If you have a loved one going through addiction recovery, it can be difficult on your emotions. Drugs aren’t the only things people can get addicted to – and you know this first hand. People can suffer from video game, pornography, sex, gambling, and other legal pleasures. The American Society of Addiction Medicine says that addiction is when you become dependent on a substance or behavior so badly that it disrupts your daily life and relationships with other people. You’ve seen how your loved one’s addiction to a substance or behavior has warped his/her sense of self and ambitions – it’s pretty much destroying his/her life.

Ironically, it’s more heartbreaking when your loved one is trying to recover from addiction – that’s when you see him/her suffer the most as he/she goes through withdrawal symptoms. The good news is there are things you can do that are proven to ease your loved one’s journey into healing and beating his/her addiction.

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1. Make a Vow to Remind Him/Her He/She is Precious Every Single Day

Addiction makes someone feel powerless, like they’re a slave to their addiction. They also feel worthless because of their perceived weakness to overcome their battle with what they’re addicted to. What makes it worse is the stigma your loved one has to carry that addicts are criminals without self-control who don’t deserve sympathy.

You, and any licensed medical professional know better – addiction is a disease and not the fault of the patient. Drug detox programs often try to educate loved ones that addiction patients deserve help and support because they’re not in control anymore – their addiction has biochemically hardwired their brains to force them into the seemingly inescapable cycle of dependency.

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That’s why it’s important to empower your loved one and remind him/her he/she is special and priceless to you and so many others. Everyday strengthen his/her fighting spirit by letting him/her know who he/she is, that he/she can beat his/her addiction, that he/she means the world to you.

Make a vow: For every day your loved one fights his/her addiction, you say to him/her: “You’re precious to me and life wouldn’t be the same without you. I want the old you back. You can beat this because you’re the most powerful person I know to fight something like this.”

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2. Cook All His/Her Meals

Psychologists now say that what you eat affects your mental health.[1] Psychologist, Emily Deans, M.D. says that eating fast food, junk food, and a typical Western high-sugar, high-fat diet shrinks your hippocampus, which is the part of your brain that helps prevent depression and dementia. Studies also show that people who eat a wholesome nutritious diet have a lower risk of depression.

Addiction preys on depression, and being depressed can make addiction recovery multiple times harder for your loved one. In fact, depression is both a hallmark symptom of addiction and withdrawal. You can help fight your loved one’s depression by making sure he/she only eats home-cooked, wholesome meals. Preventing him/her from eating junk food means you’ll help his/her hippocampus fight his/her depression by nurturing it with nutritious food.

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Bulgarian professor, Hristo Mermerski, who’s famous for inventing a recipe that’s enjoyed success in putting cancer patients in remission, advises to enrich your daily meals with omega-3 fatty acids for a healthy lifestyle and overall better mental health. He says that omega-3 fatty acids have been found to play a major role in brain biochemistry.

You don’t have to stand by and watch as your loved one suffers through withdrawal. Be proactive and fight with him/her by doing these two things! If you do these as steadfastly as your loved one fights to recover, you’ll boost his/her chances of recovery significantly.

Featured photo credit: skeeze via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] Psychology Today: Does a Wester Diet Shrink the Brain?

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Last Updated on March 30, 2020

How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

You may have heard someone say they are “totally right brained” or that they’re “a left brained person.”

There is a pervasive myth that’s been making its rounds for over a century: people have two hemispheres of their brains, and if they have a dominant left brain, they’re more analytical; and if they have a dominant right brain, they are more creative.

Before we go debunking this theory and then giving some tips for how people can access their creative brain centers, let’s first take a look at where the left brain/right brain lateralization theory comes from.

The Left Brain/Right Brain Lateralization Theory

In the 1800s, scientists discovered that when patients injured one side of their brains, certain skills were lost.[1] Scientists linked those different skills to one side of the brain or the other. Thus began the left brain/right brain myth that continues to this day.

Then, in the 1960s and 70s, Roger W. Sperry led 16 operations that cut the corpus callosum (the largest region that connects both brain hemispheres together) in order to try to treat patients’ epilepsy. Sperry wrote about the differences in the two hemispheres as a result of those surgeries.[2]

Sperry’s work was popularized in 1973 with a New York Times article about his lateralization theory—that people were either right brained (read: logical) or left brained (read: creative). From here, Sperry won the Nobel Prize for his work and numerous other publications spread the right brain/left brain myth.

Debunking the Right Brain/Left Brain Myth

If anything, the lateralization theory of the brain is a gross exaggeration. It is true that people have two hemispheres of their brains. It is also true that there are differences in the composition of those two hemispheres.

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However, the hemispheres are actually much more interconnected than Sperry’s work initially made it seem.

In a 2013 study,[3] scientists scanned over 1000 people’s brains, checking for lateralization. They confirmed that certain brain functions occur predominately in one hemisphere or the other but that, in reality, the brain is actually much more interconnected and complex than the right brain/left brain lateralization theory makes it seem.[4][5]

A New Metaphor for Right Brain/Left Brain

How do we get past this right brain/left brain myth?

First, let’s look at what contemporary cognitive science says about brain regions, and creative and logical modes of thinking.

My background is as an improviser and improv researcher. I wrote Theatrical Improvisation, Consciousness, and Cognition and think looking at improvisation and the brain can shed light on a new model for talking about unlocking the brain’s creative potential.

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans have shown that while trained improvisers improvise (musically on a keyboard, rapping, and comedic improvisation) an interesting shift happens in their brain activity. [6]

A region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases in activity and creative language centers such as the medial prefrontal cortex increase in activity. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is linked with conscious thoughts—that inner voice that tells you not to say something or criticizes you when you do.

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The medial prefrontal cortex is among the brain regions linked with creativity. So, instead of thinking about right brain and left brain, perhaps it’s more current and correct to think about more specific brain regions instead of hemispheres. Perhaps, it’s more useful to think about which activities and strategies will allow us to inhibit our dorsolateral prefrontal cortexes and allow our medial prefrontal cortexes to flourish.

How to Enhance Your “Right Brain” — Creativity

Whether we’re talking about right brain versus left brain, creative versus logical, or medial prefrontal cortex versus dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, we still know enough to talk about strategies to tap into your creative brain’s full potential.

So, now that we’ve dispelled the right brain/left brain myth and looked at a more contemporary, cognitive neuroscience theory of brain regions and creativity centers, let’s look at how to tap into the potential of your creative brain.

1. Performing Arts

One way to tap into your creative brain centers is to participate in the performing arts. Whether you improvise, act, or dance, the performing arts allow you an embodied experience that will help you snap out of your habitual, logical thoughts.

Another benefit of the performing arts is that it changes your attention. Attention and creativity are inextricably linked. When we improvise, act, or dance, we have to focus intently on our fellow performers. This means we are forced to focus less on our conscious, logical thoughts. This frees us up for more creative thinking and expression.[7]

One of the conclusions of my research on improvisation is that focusing intensely on fellow improvisers and the task at hand makes it more likely that we experience a flow state. Dr. Csikszentmihalyi,[8] a Professor of Psychology and Management defines flow as an optimal psychological state when our skills match the difficulty of the task at hand. Our perception of time is altered as we get into the zone and become more present and in the moment during our chosen activity.[9]

A flow state is a creative state. It’s the opposite of crunching numbers and forcing ourselves to work out a problem with the conscious regions of our brain. So, get up, improvise, act, or dance to access your creativity.

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2. Visual Art

Art teacher Betty Edwards[10] wrote a book called Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Here again, we see that a shift in our attention can lead us to an increase in our creative thinking.

Edwards’ book gives art students tricks to shift the way they see the world. For example, one exercise encourages students to literally flip whatever it is they’re drawing upside down before they draw it. This forces budding artists to literally see the object in a new way. This shift allows them to focus more on the individual components and patterns of the object, which allows them to draw it better.

Shifting how we see things is another way we can access our creative brain centers. Take an art class to shut off your conscious, critical thoughts and start seeing things from a new, more creative perspective.

3. Zone Out

If there’s one thing creativity doesn’t like, it’s being coerced.

I think we’ve all felt that awful feeling of trying to force ourselves to be creative. When we force it, we’re really trying to force our logical brain regions to be creative. It’s like asking your gardener to perform your appendix surgery. It’s just not what she does.

Instead, stop forcing it. Take a break. Take a long walk or a relaxing bath or shower. Let your mind wander.

Whatever you do, stop forcing it. This break lets your creative centers rise to the surface of your attention and get heard.

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4. Practice Mindfulness

The final trick to start accessing your so-called right brain is to practice mindfulness.

Now, there’s a lot of different ways to go about mindfulness. You can take a more physical approach with a yoga class. Or you can try meditating to become more aware and in tune with your thoughts and feelings: Meditation for Beginners: How to Meditate Deeply and Quickly

You could also try to incorporate fun mindfulness exercises[11] into your everyday routine like forcing yourself to go on detours or pretending you’re a detective who needs to examine people and places closely.

Any way you do it, mindfulness exercises and training can help you become better versed in how your brain works and what your normal thought process is like on a day-to-day basis. If we’re ever going to reach our optimal creativity, we have to become an expert in how our individual brain functions. Mindfulness is one way to become your very own brain expert.

Mindfulness also has added benefits like calming us, slowing our breathing, and helping us become more observant, which are also great ways to start tapping into our creative potential.

Final Thoughts

So, it may not be correct to say that our right brain is our creative brain, but it is still a valid pursuit to try to optimize our creative brain centers.

The key to do so is to relax, become observant, shift your perspective, move your body, try something new, and, whatever you do, don’t force it.

Creativity can feel slippery. It can abandon us when we need it most, but by slowing down and looking at things from a new perspective, we can give ourselves a better chance of tapping into our ultimate creativity, even if that doesn’t exactly mean our “right brain.”

More Tips on Boosting Creativity

Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

Reference

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