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Go The Extra Mile… Literally

Go The Extra Mile… Literally

Go the Extra Mile… Literally

The United States Centers for Disease Control recommends at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) of combined physical activity each week for adults, especially seniors. This regular physical exercise staves off obesity, regulates heart rate and prevents chronic disease. But people hear “get active,” and they imagine struggling at the gym or running around the neighborhood before a sweaty collapse.

Physical activity is so much easier and more enjoyable than that. The most inexpensive and easily-accessible way to get started is with a regular walking plan. It would seem to defy logic that one of the first things people learn to do can be the secret to lifelong health, but it can be. Aim to get walking now, and see how fast the miles add up.

Get a Checkup Before Starting

A check-up screens for conditions that exercisers need to be aware of, including anemia, high blood pressure and high or low blood sugar levels. If left untreated, these conditions could cause walkers to become dizzy or faint. A doctor or nurse practitioner can also help you set reasonable milestones, such as measurable weight loss and distance goals.

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Good Shoes

No walking plan will succeed without strong, stable and supportive footwear. Do not walk for exercise in sandals, flip-flops or heels. These shoes do not offer the proper arch support or balance. Trying to exercise in them can lead to falls and even injuries.

The average walker can visit a department store or footwear chain to purchase a basic pair of athletic shoes. Try them on for the best fit. Most senior citizens will want to wear orthopedic shoes for their superior, podiatrist-approved arch and heel support.

Don’t Just Burn Fuel… Consume It

Exercising on an empty stomach is not recommended under any circumstances. Walking without a proper meal first can lead to headaches, dizziness and fainting. Walking in extreme heat without water or while dehydrated can lead to mild heat stroke.

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When consumed ahead of time, nutrient-dense and iron-rich foods provide good energy to sustain workouts. Drinking water while walking increases energy and hydration. Enjoying a light, protein-rich snack after a workout replaces vitamins and minerals lost from sweat.

It is so critical to fuel, refuel and replenish ahead of time that there must be a plan for it.

  • Invest in a non-plastic, stainless steel, high-grade water bottle.
  • Carry fruit and all-natural, organic trail mixes during a walk.
  • Save dinner leftovers, then eat a portion of them as lean meals prior to or after a workout.
  • Avoid artificially-flavored and colored energy bars, energy drinks and energy powders.

Proper Positioning

Walking is not the same as jogging or aerobics. It is intended to produce a light sweat at most. According to the Mayo Clinic, the proper walking technique is:

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  • Hold head high.
  • Look forward.
  • Keep chin parallel to the ground.
  • Tighten stomach muscles slightly.
  • Walk smoothly- don’t stomp.
  • Swing arms freely with slight bend in the elbow.
  • Keep a straight back.

Improper positioning can lead to too much exertion and even falls or injuries. These small adjustments burn more calories, ease joint stress and target the right muscles.

Track Progress

The benefits of walking never wear off, but the excitement can wear down. Motivation and new goals are the keys to continue to go the extra mile. People who are committed to walking can explore the CDC’s Mall Walking program, a walking buddy or a pedometer.

A pedometer is a small device which counts the number of steps wearers make each day. The Journal of American Medicine reported that pedometer users gained 2,000 additional steps a day compared with non-users, and users’ overall physical activity level increased by about a third more than non-users. An exact figure is a powerful point of reference to measure progress and form new goals in a life of walking.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels.com via pexels.com

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Published on June 7, 2019

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

10 Lower Body Workouts Anyone Can Try at Home

Having a hard time going to the gym? Fear no more!

In this article, we’ll be breaking down 10 in home lower body workouts anyone can try at home and their exercises. No gear needed for these workouts, just some space and a cup water waiting for your disposal.

There’re 3 main parts in this article:

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just get into the first section 10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere right away.

If you want more guidance on the basics, check out the second section Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

And the last section is about what you should do before and after working out.

10 Lower Body Workouts That Can Be Done Anywhere

If you’re familiar with the basic lower body exercises, just read on this section.

If you’d like to have more guidance on each exercise listed in these 10 workouts, take a look at the following part Lower Body Exercises Breakdown.

1. The Starter Workout

3 sets of 8-12 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 2 min rest in between each set)

2. The 7 Minute Workout

3 rounds of 30 seconds of each exercise:

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  • Walking Lunges
  • Quarter Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(1 min rest in between each round)

3. The Unilateral Workout

4 sets of 16 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunges
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Skater Squat
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge

(30 sec to 1 min rest in between each set)

4. The Endurance Workout

2 sets of 20-50 reps of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Glute Bridge

(1-2 min rest in between each set)

5. The Back To Back Lower Body Workout

5 rounds of 10 to 20 seconds of each exercise:

  • Skater Squat
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(30 min rest in between each round)

6. Strength Lower Body Workout

5 to 10 sets of 4 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Squat

(30 sec to 2 mins of rest time in between set)

7. Glute Burner Workout

4 sets of 10-30 reps of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift
  • Single Leg Glute Bridge
  • Quarter Squat

(1 min of rest time in between set)

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8. The Advance Lower Body Workout

3 rounds of 20 seconds of:

  • Squat
  • Walking Lunge
  • Skater Squat
  • Reverse Lunge
  • Glute Bridge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(2 mins of rest time in between set)

9. The Quick Lower Body Workout

2 sets of 10 reps of:

  • Reverse Lunge
  • Step Up
  • Single Leg Deadlift

10. The 100 Repetition Challenge

2 sets of 50 reps on each leg of:

  • Walking Lunge
  • Single Leg Deadlift

(4 mins of rest time in between set)

Lower Body Exercises Breakdown

Here’s the breakdown of the lower body exercises[1] that you found in the workouts listed in the first section of this article.

1. Squat

    A squat is a compound movement which entails the recruitment of a majority of your lower body (quadriceps, hamstrings, gluteal muscles, spinal erectors).

    How to squat:

    Feet shoulder width apart or a little wider. Toes pointed slightly out, arms out in front of you. Sit into your heels till you hit parallel with your butt and knee, drive through the heels, return to starting position and repeat.

    2. Walking Lunges

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      A lunge is a complex movement which recruits mainly the lower body.

      The walking lunges are a harder version of a split squat which is stationary and then adds the component of stepping and keeping balance which engages the gluteus medius as well as allowing a larger range of motion.

      3. Reverse Lunge

        A reverse lunge is very similar to the split squat but instead, after every rep, you are returning to the starting position and stepping back.

        By reverse stepping, you are allowing for a better emphasis on the hamstrings and gluteal muscles as opposed to the quadriceps muscles in a forward stepping lunge.

        4. Quarter Squat

          A quarter squat is the top ¼ movement of a squat. This will work mainly the gluteal muscles as it emphasizes the hip extension and not a lot of range of motion on the quadriceps muscles.

          5. Skater Squat

            A skater squat is a unilateral variation of the squat, this squat really engages the gluteus medius and hamstrings as it works unilateral stability and hip flexion which fires both the hamstrings and glutes.

            6. Step Up

              The Step Up is the greatest balance of getting the glutes and quadriceps muscles firing. Doing Step Ups will not only get the glutes going, but the quadriceps as well.

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              7. Glute Bridge

                Glute Bridges are a great way to nearly isolate the glutes and build a great butt. This entire movement works through hip extension which the main movement of the gluteal muscles.

                8. Single Leg Glute Bridge

                  Single leg glute bridge ensures that we are evenly building the glutes and not relying too heavily on our dominant leg and symmetrical butt. The step up can be done in a chair or a step in the stairs

                  9. Single Leg Deadlift

                    Single Leg RDL’s engage that entire booty and hamstrings, especially the gluteus medius due to its unilateral stability property. This is a great way to spice up some routine deadlifts.

                    Before & After Working Out

                    Before engaging in any physical activity, consult a doctor if you have not worked out in years. However, if you want to go at it without consulting a doctor, start slow and build your way up. Even though it’s home workout, use dynamic stretching or some light jogging[2] as a warm up before starting the lower body workouts.

                    Finally, at the end of the lower body workout, use static stretching to reduce injuries and to calm down your heart rate gradually.

                    Featured photo credit: Gesina Kunkel via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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