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6 Powerful Tips for Successful Contract Management

6 Powerful Tips for Successful Contract Management

When hiring new human resources for your company, some aspects of formalizing this process tend to be messy, leading businesses to waste precious time on something that is supposed to be a straightforward process. If the recruiter neglects aspects of the contract, or potential legal voids are left unsolved, this neglectful performance will inevitably produce a significant impact on your company.

So how can you ensure that this managerial process meets the needs of both employee and recruiter? It goes further than a simple document filled with pre-settlements and clauses overseen by lawyers, but a precise method to cover all the aspects of an agreement; therefore, HR professionals ought to have cutting-edge managerial skills to provide a valid performance in handling not just the legal document, but the company’s relationship with the hired newcomer.

Here are some effective tips to improve your organization’s recruitment performance.

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1. Don’t leave any doors open

Good contract documents are those that include performance indicators as contractual obligations; and by asserting this point your potential supplier will know beforehand what is expected of him/her, as well as setting ground for sanctions in case the provider’s work isn’t what it’s supposed to be.

Social media conduct clauses should also be included to prevent sensitive data leak, but also to protect your company’s reputation, as employees commonly engage in topics like politics, sports, and social causes without even realizing they automatically label themselves as part of your organization when they add their workplace on their social media profile.

2. Set an escape route

Relationships tend to deteriorate with time, and companies are just the prime example of that. It could be labelled as a smart move to establish your “plan B,” in case things go wrong by stating all the elements that can lead both parties to contract annulment. It’s a confidence boost for the employee, as you are saying beforehand the terms and conditions that can end the contract if needed, but also cover your back from potential court audiences.

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3. Keep tabs on what both parties have agreed

The basis of a good managerial performance relies on not just signing a contract, but doing a constant follow up of your employee’s conduct. By doing this, you are sticking to the contractual obligations that were established, as well as securing your organization’s interests. Schedule monthly reunions with your recruited staff, and provide a valid checklist of the elements that are not going as expected, as well as counteractions to solve these issues; the sooner, the better.

Set measurable goals for both recruiter and employee; that is the way healthy businesses work.

    Photo courtesy of Tim Gouw

    4. Remind yourself that contracts have expiration dates

    This is a point commonly neglected. People tend to archive contracts without even bothering to look at the actual contract end date; and, since all contracts should have start and end date, as relationship terms naturally change with time, this unsafe practice leads the organization to conflicts between both parties, as technically the supplier isn’t even working under legal terms, and his/her situation should be reviewed as soon as possible.

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    5. New times require new resources

    We are in 2017, so a pen and notebook are not acceptable methods for tracking contractual details, nor for managing several deals with long terms. With the advantages in Enterprise Contract Management Solutions, software can offer us all the elements needed to keep tabs on the documents produced. Plus, it also provides analysis tools for HR managers to track milestones and obligations, generate reports, and much more.

    6. Analyze behaviour prior to settling a contract

    You want this whole ordeal to be a success, right? First of all, you need to remind yourself that contracts are not just legal obligations, but also reflections of a formal setting between two parties. Those parties aren’t necessarily driven by the same motivations when looking for success.

    By doing some easy, relaxed questions during the interview process, you can pinpoint warning elements – that can be both positive or negative – about the performance of your future employee. If unsure, request help from a professional to give your organization an insight about these analyses.

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    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via pexels.com

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    Last Updated on March 23, 2021

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

    One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

    The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

    You need more than time management. You need energy management

    1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

    How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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    I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

    I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

    2. Determine your “peak hours”

    Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

    Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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    My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

    In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

    Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

    3. Block those high-energy hours

    Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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    Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

    If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

    That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

    There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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    Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

    Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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