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6 Signs that Your Family is Ready for a Pet

6 Signs that Your Family is Ready for a Pet

You’re having a day out at the local park with your family when a cute poodle and her owner walk by. Suddenly, your daughter ignites the “can we get a dog?” conversion, making sure she throws in just the right amount of sadness and despair in her voice. This time, instead of throwing the standard “No, you are not ready for a pet yet” response, you actually consider introducing a new member to the family but are worried about the challenges.

You’re not alone. Many families often have a difficult time deciding when to introduce a new furry member to the family, especially when there are kids involved. Living with a pet is a huge responsibility that requires a lot of patience and support from each family member.

Before you introduce that fluffy friend into the family, check to see if your family meets these requirements.

1. You are allowed to keep pets in your area

One of the many perks of owning a standalone home is the freedom to set your own rules, including whether or not to adopt a pet. Plus, if your home comes with a large enough yard, your pet dog can run around freely.

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Apartments don’t usually come with the same level of freedom. Many apartment buildings often have restrictions on the type and size of the pets allowed within the building.

You should also check with the authorities in the area you live for breeds that aren’t allowed. For instance, Staffordshire bull terriers, American pit bull terriers, and related dog breeds are illegal in the county of Miami-Dade, Florida.

2. No one in the family has pet allergies

In the US, over 15% of the entire population is allergic to cats and dogs.[1] Acute allergic reactions have been known to cause death and numerous visits to emergency rooms across the country.

Before getting a dog, a cat, or any other pet, ensure everyone at home has been tested for allergies, especially the older members of the family. Kids usually outgrow allergies and most often develop immunity against allergens.

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3. Free Time

Dogs and many other pets often require owners to commit a significant amount of time to care for them. They have to be trained on etiquette around the house, walked regularly, fed, washed, and socialized with other family members. You should identify at least one or two members of your family who have enough time each day to hang out with the pet, especially if it’s a dog.

Spending time with your pet will enable you to become a good animal whisperer, which will help you become a better pet owner.

Once you have the time aspect covered, you’ll be at least halfway on the journey to adopting your next pooch or cat.

4. Financial Capability

Apart from the money you spend when adopting your pet, you should also be prepared to spend extra cash on a daily or weekly basis on things like food and preventative care. Pets like dogs and cats will usually need to be neutered or sprayed before being adopted. Recurrent expenses on food, toys, cleaning supplies, and routine or emergency visits to the vet should also be factored in when adopting a pet.

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Therefore, always factor in the amount of disposal income(s) in the family when bringing in a pet into your lives.

5. Everyone in the family is on board

Imagine bringing a labrador home and then realizing your teenage kid is terrified of dogs. Many pet owners often make the mistake of assuming everyone else loves dogs, cats, or other pets. Adding a new member to the family should be a joint decision, with each member of the family involved in the decision-making process.

Duties and responsibilities should be shared out among family members, including the kids.

6. You’re ready to learn

New pets always come with a steep learning curve. Owners must learn about how to keep their pets safe and healthy, including proper nutrition and knowing when to take the pet to a vet. Invest in training for members of your family who are willing to learn, including the kids.

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Educated pet owners in the family are more likely to raise happy and healthy pets compared to those who leave everything to chance.

Bottom Line

Being a pet owner is a fulfilling achievement, especially when the whole family is on board. It also comes with its own set of challenges, so make sure you and your family are prepared before taking that step.

Featured photo credit: Pixabay.com via pixabay.com

Reference

[1] Pet Education: Human Allergies to Dogs

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Vikas Agrawal

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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