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Understanding Millennials – Who is Generation Y?

Understanding Millennials – Who is Generation Y?

Introducing Generation Y

Every generation has its own traits. For example, the Baby Boomers (born between 1946 – 1964) were said to be work-centric, independent, goal-oriented and competitive. This was driven by their environment, following the second world war when numbers of marriages dropped yet the birth rate increased meaning that the school classrooms were fuller and there was considerable competition for college places.

The same is true with the latest generation, the Millennials, the generation born between 1985 and 2000. A generation forged by the environment they have grown up in, one of greater environmental awareness, new technology and changing workplaces.

Millennials are a now major part of society, making up 27% of the US population, just over 83 million people in total,[1] therefore they have a massive influence on products and major purchasing power averaging around $600 Billion last year (an amount expected to grow to $1.4 Trillion by 2020).

It is for this reason that many organisations have developed specific marketing strategies for millennial’s. However, who are they? How can they be defined and most importantly how can you categorize a generation?

Who are the millennial’s and how do they behave?

Millennials have a complex set of traits very different from ‘Generation X’ they have lived through a time of considerable change in terms of the environment, culture and technology.

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One of the often used phrases to describe millennial’s is the ‘Peter Pan generation’, this is the phenomenon of not wanting, or not being able, to leave their teenage years behind. A combination of the media glamorizing teenage life making it seem more attractive and real financial struggles, , more young people than ever are living with their parents for longer. Pew Research found that over 32% of millennial’s are still living with mum and dad and over 35% are not settling down in relationships until much later, not finding partners and considering children until at least 35 years old.[2]

Millennials Family

    They are aware of marketing efforts, when it comes to purchasing decisions they would rather read independent blogs than believe advertising.  33% read online content to support a purchasing decision, whereas only 3% consider TV as an influencer.[3]

    Millennials Built For Technology

    Growing up during a technological revolution, with the birth of the world wide web in the early 90’s and the introduction of computers with graphical user interfaces like Windows they are certainly engaged with technology.

    A Nielsen survey[4] reveals 85% of millennial’s have a smartphone which they are likely to check more than 45 times per day.[5]  87% are regular users of Facebook and engage with social media regularly.[6] However, being more social online often has an impact on their offline friendships, they may have many hundreds of Facebook friends but struggle to engage with individuals face to face. The exception is in the workplace where friendships are being developed more easily, with more time spent at work millennial’s use the opportunity to make real friendships which have even been found to increase productivity, 57% of respondents in a recent survey found that having friends at work made them more happy and productive.[7]

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    The growth of online video has also made an impact, 80% of millennial’s use video when making decisions about product purchases and 76% follow their favourite brands on YouTube.[8]

    Millennials Favourite Video Site - You Tube

      Politics and Authority

      The two phrases which come about when you speak about millennial’s are entitled and narcissistic, many people class the millennial’s as ‘the me generation’ and, as a recent study shows, ‘entitled’ is a label  which even millennial’s themselves use.

      Dr. Jean Twenge, author of books including ‘Generation Me’ and ‘The Narcissism Epidemic’ says; “Instead of viewing entitlement as a sense that the universe owes you something you may not have earned, many view entitlement as the right to go after big goals and aim high — without asking for permission from gatekeepers and authority figures.”

      Therefore, we are seeing a generation who is self-absorbed, but that this is for a positive reason, they no longer feel they have to be governed by external authority or that any goal is out of their reach.  Young people feel less affiliated with politics or religion, research shows more than 50% do not feel involved with politics and 29% take no part in organised religion.

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      Donald Trump

        Young people now expect that working hard should yield rewards, however not purely fiscal rewards. A recent survey showed that 75% of respondents would rather work for a company who was socially responsible even if the salary offered was less and 64% would not work for an organisation which did not have strong social or environmental commitments.[9]

        Millennials Facts

          In the workplace 55% of millennial’s state they are not engaged with their work, it’s a ‘means to an end’ and they are not motivated to deliver therefore productivity is lower.[10] This is a higher percentage than any previous generation. They require regular engagement and feedback, with 44% being more likely to be engaged when their manager holds regular meetings with them and offers regular feedback. They need a coaching environment more than supervision.[11]

          It paints a picture of a self-driven generation who know their mind and needs to feel that they are taking a personal responsibility not only for themselves as the accusation of narcissism states, but also the wider community. They do not necessarily feel involved or controlled by government and are instead striving to forge their own path.  Overall millennial’s have a greater concern for others than many previous generations with concerns for environmental issues and social causes being high on their agendas, many seek to buy products from organisations which support social causes they care about and work for organisations who demonstrate a corporate responsibility.

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          The Millennial Culture

          The millennial age also created a range of music and pop culture moments. It’s the generation which embraced digital music, no longer having to buy a whole album instead being able to pick and chose tracks. More and more people became musical explorers as the technology allowed you to discover new music from around the world in a way that the record shop of previous generations could never have done. There was the growth of a closer relationship with artists via social media, initially using MySpace but now with Facebook, Twitter and others allowing fans to be closer to their favourite performers than ever before. Even the video model changed with the introduction of Netflix, albeit as a service which mailed you physical DVD’s but it was to mark the end of video rental and soon was to become what it is today with instant streaming.

          The top 100 cultural highlights have been collated by Vulture.com, some of the most notable highlights include:[12]

          • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air – with a catchy theme tune every millennial could sing even now (with thanks to Will Smith and Quincy Jones).
          • The Cha-Cha Slide – that packed dancefloors with synchronised sliding and criss-crossing.
          • Now That’s What I Call Music – a regular musical treat throughout the generation an LP, CD or download of the best music of the moment.
          • Toy Story – basically the birth of Pixar on the big screen and the development of CGI and computer animation generation
          • The Spice Girls – The baby boomer generation may have had the birth of feminism the millennial’s had the birth of Girl Power.
          • Harry Potter – it was the series of books which made reading essential again and then a series of pivotal films

          Millennials Impact on The World

          Although it’s early days for many of millennial’s, when you look at the inventions created already you can see that we may be in for exciting times ahead. This is the generation who created Google, when Sergey Brin and Larry Page sat down and rethought how the internet should be searched and Mark Zucherburg’s Facebook as well as the creation of Twitter and Snapchat. This is to be expected of the first generation of digital natives for whom their smartphones and mobile internet have become a necessity, on average sending 50 texts per day and permanent social media connectivity there’s more communication than any other generation before them. However, they are also a generation with less available income and higher student loan debts, averaging $20,926 before they start working impacting their major purchasing decisions, for example 30% not intending to purchase a car in the near future[13] and over 60% choosing to rent rather than purchase a house.[14] They are certainly Savvy with 57% using technology to compare prices when in stores.[15]

          Google

            The Millennial Future

            The millennial generation is the largest in US history, as they start to reach working age their impact on the economy will be vast. They are a generation who will not be held back, they have the technology to develop amazing things, and if it’s not there they will create it. A massively driven generation who care about the world they live in and have clear ideas of what they want to achieve in their lives. They consider how they live with wellness and health being key. They are living through the effects of massive global financial downturns and rapid change but are succeeding and growing for the future.

            Image Sources: Family, You Tube Logo, Donald Trump, Millennial InfographicComputer

            Featured photo credit: Pixabay.com via pixabay.com

            Reference

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            Last Updated on September 16, 2019

            How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

            How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

            You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

            We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

            The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

            Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

            1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

            Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

            For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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            • (1) Research
            • (2) Deciding the topic
            • (3) Creating the outline
            • (4) Drafting the content
            • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
            • (6) Revision
            • (7) etc.

            Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

            2. Change Your Environment

            Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

            One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

            3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

            Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

            Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

            My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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            Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

            4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

            If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

            Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

            I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

            5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

            I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

            Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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            As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

            6. Get a Buddy

            Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

            I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

            7. Tell Others About Your Goals

            This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

            For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

            8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

            What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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            9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

            If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

            Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

            10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

            Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

            Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

            11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

            At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

            Reality check:

            I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

            More About Procrastination

            Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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