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Increase, Boost and Improve Your Natural Mindset

Increase, Boost and Improve Your Natural Mindset

A wise man once said, “Life is a battle of Cosmic vs. Psychological reality.”

This statement has profound connotations in regards to all of mankind’s universal beliefs, thoughts, and existence.

The psychological aspect of a person’s learned behavior from birth could be described as a nearly impregnable wall of beliefs. An individual who was taught and self-taught in a material world. A world where the five senses of observation can become a religious following of accumulation.

This psychological learned behavior can be the most beautiful or the most horrific prison of the mind.


    On the other hand the Cosmic person, Celestial Mechanic, Physical Cosmologist or Astrophysicist has an automatic self-awareness which goes beyond the immediate five senses.

    The earth as we know it is smaller than a spec of dust on the hide of an elephant’s backside.

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      Every individual on earth could likely be described as the quantum particle of the universe. This immensity and visualization in mind are what we require to gauge a clear understanding of Cosmic vs. Psychological existence.

      Thinking Outside the Box

      The mind will tell us what everything is according to what we see, hear, feel, touch, smell, and experience in the physical world.

      The cosmos will tell us we are but the equivalent of a passing thought on a universal level.

      The path to a widened mind is found by looking outside of our learned psychology and realizing the cosmic existence of scale, and its impact on our mindset and behavior.

      Thinking outside of the box of our immediate existence allows a natural neuroplasticity within the physical brain. New neural connections and networks are created which allow greater growth, clarity, and understanding on a much higher level.

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        Physics theory and celestial calculations are involved in such visuals as shown above. Let us say the inside box represents the knowledge within while the outside box is the unknown. Like a fish that swims in the known universe of water. The fish lives and breathes water. It is the known. It is the tank of life for the fish. The unknown for the fish as we know “would be incomprehensible.” As an observer, If a fish had the intellect to look beyond their known universe how would that play out for the other fish in the sea? We can assume the ideas, concepts, and methods proposed by that fish would likely be accepted only by those who carry openness, interest, curiosity and tolerance in their hearts.

        Let us say the inside box represents the knowledge within while the outside box is the unknown. Like a fish that swims in the known universe of water. The fish lives and breathes water. It is the known. It is the tank of life for the fish. The unknown for the fish as we know “would be incomprehensible.” As an observer, if a fish had the intellect to look beyond their known universe how would that play out for the other fish in the sea? We can assume the ideas, concepts, and methods proposed by that fish would likely be accepted only by those who carry openness, interest, curiosity and tolerance in their hearts.

        Learning and Increasing Awareness

        Any person with a relatively expansive intellect collects, retains and disperses information in a manner which is obviously different from the mainstream individual. Notice the pic below which shows the “access to meaning” area of the brain. This area also happens to be related to studies which involved meditation practitioners.

        Tolerance, consistency, openness and interest will be paramount personality traits related to the success of anyone embarking towards increased awareness.

          Support article from Author Trane Francks, see below:

          “Consciousness and physical matter may be more related than we think. For example, we know that all matter exhibits particle/wave duality. Depending on the expectations of the observer, one sees matter behaving as a particle or as a wave. The expectations of the observer brings the question of consciousness inextricably into the equation, yet we don’t yet have the math to quantify this interaction. Being able to directly measure and quantify the effects of consciousness is an ambitious goal, but it may very well be strictly outside our ability because the simple act of observing (measuring) affects the outcome. You cannot observe something without having consequences.”

          This descriptive statement above is not new physics information. It can be found in any documentary or talk about basic physics.

          The reality of what you observe and interpret in your everyday life is the key to positive change.

          Support material:

          Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
          November 18, 2015

          “When the brain forms memories or learns a new task, it encodes the new information by tuning connections between neurons”

          Berkeley’s graduate division on Neuroscience Website:

          “Changing the brain: For optimal learning to occur, the brain needs conditions under which it is able to change in response to stimuli (neuroplasticity) and able to produce new neurons (neurogenesis).

          Stress, adequate sleep, good nutrition, and regular exercise all play parts in the overall improvements.

          The most effective learning involves recruiting multiple regions of the brain for the learning task. These regions are associated with such functions as memory, the various senses, volitional control, and higher levels of cognitive functioning.”

            Diffused Learning: Getting Started

            A simple 1 step task of starting with 15-60 minutes per day (15 days-30 days) on a topic outside of our immediate knowledge “such as cosmology or meditation” can help to expand our thinking, actions, and performance in all aspects of life.

            Every individual will respond differently to this type of approach. Some will require shorter periods of stimulation and others more.

            This diffused learning process must be carried out consistently for at least 15 days-30 days.

            Audio tapes can be listened to during commutes, in the office, during light workouts, etc.

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            This is all about diffused learning and thinking on the right side of the brain.

            Good luck readers!

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            praveen nadaraju

            Classical & Computer Animator & Industrial Designer

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            Last Updated on September 10, 2018

            Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

            Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

            We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

            Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

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            Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

            Looking at images of loved ones

            While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

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            In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

            Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

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            Exercise

            Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

            Meditation

            Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

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            In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

            When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

            With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

            Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

            Reference

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