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7 Ways To Fix Damaged Hair and Get Your Healthy Hair Back

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7 Ways To Fix Damaged Hair and Get Your Healthy Hair Back

Having gorgeous locks is every woman’s dream. Sadly, not all of us are blessed with soft and silky hair. Much like the skin, the hair is a fragile part of our body. It’s prone to breakage and damage, which can cause dullness and dryness. Most hair damage today is a result of overusing harsh hair care products, exposure to heat and sunlight, and nutritional deficiencies, which strip hair of its needed proteins and minerals.

How can you fix your damaged hair? Before you go buy expensive hair repair products, try the following ways to get back your hair’s beautiful bounce.

1. Don’t Overwash Hair

Hair damage is often caused by over-washing hair. When you wash your hair every day, you lose most of its natural oils that actually help it shine and bounce. Shampoo also makes your hair look dry and more prone to breakage. So how often should you wash hair? It’s best to wash hair only once every other day.

2. Use The Right Brush / Comb for Your Hair Type

Using the right hairbrush can make a big difference to your hair health. Combs and brushes come in all kinds, shape, and sizes. Here are basic pointers to remember when choosing a brush for your hair:

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Brushes

Paddle brushes are best used for straight hair. These brushes massage the scalp and smooth out naturally straight hair. Soft bristle brushes are good for women with thin hairs. They help smooth out the finest hair cuticles and distribute the oils evenly on your head. You can also use this kind of brush to comb your wet hair. Styling brush with movable bristles is great for curly hair. This will help detangle wet locks and help curls clump together for a more defined wave pattern.

Combs

Wide tooth combs are used for detangling thick hair especially if it’s wet. While small tooth combs are used for styling and separating hair while ironing.

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3. Try Natural Home Ingredients To Treat Your Hair

Forget about expensive hair care products. Most of these treatments or shampoos use harsh chemicals that strip the hair of its natural oils removing its natural shine and bounce. Try these simple natural ingredients instead:

Apple Cider Vinegar Hair Rinse

Apple cider vinegar is great for removing chemical buildup from hair products. To use apple cider vinegar for hair, simply dilute a quarter cup of the vinegar with a cup of water and use it to rinse away hairspray and gel buildup.

Aloe Vera Serum

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Aloe vera can help condition locks to give it a fuller volume while maintaining its bounciness. To create an aloe vera serum, use a teaspoon of honey with olive oil. Apply it to your hair and let it sit for half an hour before washing.

Olive Oil Conditioner

Moisturize your dry hair by using olive oil as a conditioner. Olive oil encourages hair growth with its natural hair softening ingredients. Olive oil contains essential nutrients that help strengthen the hair from the roots to the tips of your hair.

4. Quit Using the Blow Dryer

Your hair is fragile especially to heat. This is why curling irons and blow dryers are strictly a no-no. If you want to have silky soft locks, simply let your hair air dry. Blow drying is only excusable during cold days when you simply can’t leave the house with wet hair. When you really need to use the blow dryer keep it to at least four to six inches away from your hair. Using the hair dryer too close and heating your hair in direct contact can damage hair strands giving it a brittle and dull texture.

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5. Trim Your Hair Regularly

Haircuts help you get rid of unsightly split ends; that’s why regular trims are important to keep damaged hair away. If your hair is severely damaged and has a straw-like texture, the easiest way to restore your locks is to get a trim. You can leave some length or chop it all off and try a cute pixie if you’re bold enough. You should probably get a trim every six to eight weeks.

6. Avoid Exposure From the Sun

Sun damage can cause dry brittle hair as well as color fade and thinning. When you’re out for a sun bathe, don’t forget to use your sombrero and cap to protect your hair from the heat. Use a little bit of sunscreen on your scalp line to avoid burning and damaging of hair roots.

7. Eat Hair Healthy Foods

And lastly, eat food rich in vitamins and minerals. A diet rich in proteins, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy can keep your hair healthy. Examples of food for healthy hair includes salmon, spinach, guava, sweet potatoes, and cinnamon.

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Armela Escalona

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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