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Good Reasons To Learn A Musical Instrument Today

Good Reasons To Learn A Musical Instrument Today

Music is an important part of everyone, but people have failed to realize that music can be beneficial in our day-to-day activities while also affecting our mental life.  Learning to play an instrument doesn’t come easy. But, the beauty of it all is that people of all ages can learn to play a musical instrument.

If you’re looking for a way to improve your life other, you should consider learning a musical instrument. This article will directly pinpoint some benefits of learning to play an instrument:

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1. Improve Learning

The intellectual exercise involved in music is expansive and broad for most instrument motor skills, and finger placement is a must if you learn to play an instrument effectively. The notes on music sheets require you to count the beat and calculate when you should play, for how long, and at what speed. That said, learning to play an instrument will allow you to build your mathematical and logical skills to visualize rhythm patterns and to read music.

2. Increase Patience

Learning to play an instrument demands patience. You won’t be able to do it right away the first time you sit on the bench. You need to practice harder, and the more you practice, the better you will be. But, this requires immense patience and calmness. Exhibiting patience while learning a musical instrument will go a long way in helping you to be a patient person in all ramifications of your life.

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3. Lower Cortisol Levels

One of the main benefits of learning to play an instrument is that it helps improve the flow and balance of oxygen in your body. Music can lower cortisol levels in your body. As you may know, cortisol is the body’s stress hormone, responsible for the fight or flight response. Lowering cortisol levels will make you feel more at peace and transposed.

4. Fuels Concentration

Focusing on a single activity often, like learning to play a chord on the guitar, piano, or a simple drum beat, requires attention. As a musical instrument learner, being able to develop your concentration skills through such tasks can help you concentrate in other areas in your life, such as studying for a test or writing that report for work.

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5. Help Your Mental Health

Learning to play an instrument is a great accomplishment. When you feel down, you can remind yourself of all of the hard work and practice you did to be able to play a song. That said, learning to play an instrument can be a source for self-esteem, as you see yourself as someone who gets things done versus someone who stands on the sidelines, watching life roll by.

Also, focusing on playing that note on the piano or cord on the guitar can help provide you with a healthy distraction from unwanted anxiety or angst. When life becomes stressful, instead of going for sugar and fast food (or whatever your unhealthy go-to in stressful situations) you can now pick up the guitar or sit on that piano bench and play your stress away.

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Learning to play a musical instrument can be entertaining or frustrating for some people. But, irrespective of your age, you can still benefit from learning an instrument. Besides all benefits, learning to play an instrument will have a direct impact on your mental health, improve creativity and discipline.

Ready to pick up that instrument you’ve set aside for some time? Ready to call up that piano teacher or go on Youtube? Go start playing today and enjoy the many benefits it brings you.

How has playing a musical instrument affected your life? What benefits have you received? Please don’t hesitate to leave a comment.

Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

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George Olufemi O

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Published on July 15, 2020

7 Ways to Improve Focus And Memory (Backed By Science)

7 Ways to Improve Focus And Memory (Backed By Science)

You know that feeling when you’re wide awake, but your brain isn’t? You want better focus and memory, but you just can’t seem to get there.

I call it “brain fog”—an annoying mental haze that results in difficulty focusing, trouble retaining information, and, as a result, compromised effectiveness.

For some reason, the fog always seems to sneak up on me when I need my brain power the most, like before an important presentation or on the day before a major project is due. However, with the right tools, I usually find my way back to better focus and memory in the nick of time.

Like the dense clouds that hover over city streets, brain fog can feel impossible to cut through.

Fortunately, the human brain is resilient. With a little training and redirection, it’s possible to reclaim your mind from the fog and all the frustration (and lost time) that comes with it.

Struggling to stay on task or retain information? Try these 7 science-backed methods for better focus and memory

1. Do a Short, Strenuous Workout

I had slept for a full eight hours and eaten a nutritious breakfast. I had even had an extra cup of coffee that morning. But none of it was enough to wake up my brain. (Of course, I also happened to be on an important deadline.) So, I did the last thing I could think of: I shut my laptop and hit the gym.

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There’s plenty of well-known evidence that physical activity can positively impact brain health, including a person’s memory. While many of exercise’s health benefits occur with regular, long-term activity, a single bout of exercise can also pack a significant, immediate, punch.

To improve your memory with exercise, think short bouts and high exertion. The more strenuous the workout, the better the brain boost. In a recent study, researchers found a group of people who rode on a stationary bike for 20 minutes had an improved ability to remember faces[1].

Rather than taking a long, leisurely walk on your lunch break, try running up and down the stairs a few times, or find a place to do some jumping jacks for a few minutes. You’ll not only jump start your energy and sharpen your focus, but you’ll improve your memory in the process.

2. Exercise After You Learn

If you’re starting a new job, learning a new skill, or just attending an important meeting, do yourself a favor and plan your workout for four hours afterward. Along with boosting your focus, a bit of high-intensity movement can also be a simple way to retain recently learned knowledge—but only if you exercise at the right time.

In their research, scientists had participants learn a set of picture-location associations. One group rode a stationary bike at high intensity right after learning, another group did the exercise four hours later, and the final group didn’t do any physical activity.

Using an MRI, researchers found the individuals who exercised four hours after learning retained the most information compared to the other learners[2].

3. Cut the Distractions

There’s a time and a place for a break to re-calibrate your brain, but these breaks should be intentional. Constant interruptions won’t do you any favors, except for interrupting your workflow, and they certainly won’t lead to better focus and memory.

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I find I’m most productive and focused when I don’t give myself the opportunity to mentally switch gears. That means I keep distractions to a minimum the best I can.

When I want to achieve a state of “flow,” I put my phone on airplane mode so I don’t receive notifications that will veer me off track. I also eliminate unnecessary distractions by keeping my desk and office space clear of clutter when possible, and closing all other tabs on my internet browser.

Since the brain isn’t hard-wired to multi-task, I also try not to listen to podcasts or distracting music, which compete for my attention. Instead, I opt for classical music, which has been thought to improve focus by enhancing brain activity[3].

4. Go Outside

When it comes to better focus and memory, a little fresh air and beautiful scenery can go a long way. Even if you simply sit outside for your lunch break, you’re giving your brain more oxygen, which can boost your energy levels and improve overall brain function.

Spending longer chunks of time in nature can have profound, immediate effects on the mind. One study found memory performance and attention spans improved by 20 percent in people who spent just one hour in nature[4].

Don’t let the cloudy or cold weather keep you from the outdoors; researchers found the same effects across the board. Surprisingly, even simply viewing nature photos had a similar effect on people.

If you absolutely can’t venture outside, temporarily move your workstation to an area with plants (or go out and buy a potted plant or some fresh stems for your home office). One study found that adding live plants to an office increased employee productivity by 15 percent and improved workers’ concentration[5].

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5. Meditate

Having a hard time focusing or remembering important details? Train your brain and body to stay in the present by practicing mindful meditation, which can also benefit your mental and physical health.

Scientific evidence shows meditating can actually change your brain structure, leading to a sharper short-term memory and an improved ability to learn[6]

Meditation can also help the brain with emotional regulation and sustained attention[7].

Luckily, you don’t have to be a pro to reap the benefits of meditation. One of my favorite ways to meditate is simply sitting with my eyes closed for five minutes and taking deep breaths from my belly, in through the nose and out through the mouth.

Whenever I get distracted by an outside noise—or more likely, if my brain wanders to whatever I have coming up later on that day—I try to shift my focus back to my breathing. Those ten minutes make a huge difference in both my focus and my overall mood.

6. Grab a Cup of Coffee (or Two)

Fortunately for me, there’s actual scientific evidence behind my favorite afternoon pick-me-up habit: a hot cup of coffee. Can’t get out for a quick bout of exercise? Simply walk to your favorite coffee shop (or your kitchen), instead.

By getting up or going out for a drink, you’ll not only glean the benefits of some exercise and a much-needed break, but the process of sipping your drink, you’ll become more productive. A 2016 study found a caffeine jolt (as low as 40 mg, which is around four ounces of regular coffee) can improve alertness, attention span, and reaction time.

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A bit of caffeine can even help with vigilance, or the ability to sustain performance on boring tasks[8].

7. Do Something Else

Training your mind to remain in the present can lead to better focus and memory. However, zoning out or doing something else completely, as counter-intuitive as it may seem, has a similar effect on the mind.

Here’s why losing focus is more productive than you think: when you’re concentrated on something, your frontal cortex is busy resisting distractions. If you stay concentrated for too long, your ability to resist distractions will become fatigued, and that Netflix show or your Instagram feed will become all the more appealing[9]

Let your mind take a break from the task at hand if you’re losing steam. Instead of forcing yourself to focus, daydream, solve another problem, or engage in an engrossing, hands-on activity, like washing the dishes.

Sure, it may feel counterproductive to take your mind (and hands) off the project you’re trying to focus on, but you’ll probably come back to the task with a refreshed mind—and maybe, if you’re lucky, a kitchen full of clean dishes.

More Tips on Obtaining Better Focus and Memory

Featured photo credit: Tim van der Kuip via unsplash.com

Reference

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