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Facing Discrimination At Work? How to Tell & What to Do

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Facing Discrimination At Work? How to Tell & What to Do

Are you familiar with the glass ceiling? It’s a term used to describe the obstacles that many women and members of minority groups face when trying to advance in their careers or professions. It’s no secret that historically, women as a whole have earned less, on average, than their male counterparts. No matter how much progress we have made in terms of equality in recent years, that fact has not changed.

However, what a lot of people may not know is that women are at risk of coming face-to-face with a lot more than just career advancement hurdles. Women are supposed to be protected by the U.S. Employment Equal Opportunity Commission, which enforces federal laws to protect women against gender-based workplace discrimination. But, we don’t live in a perfect world, and not all acts of discrimination are reported or even noticed. So, how can you tell if you’re facing discrimination at work?

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Discrimination Against Women In The Workplace

There is no one-size-fits-all when it comes to discrimination at work. Generally speaking, workplace discrimination typically occurs by way of sexual harassment, withholding promotions or bonuses, disallowing women from taking part in training opportunities or other work-related activities, and more.

Sexual Harassment At Work

According to the American Association of University Women, sexual harassment, in its most general form, is described as “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.” That includes bribes for sexual activity, suggestive jokes, “pervasive displays of materials with sexually illicit or graphic content,” and more. Sexual harassment against a female isn’t always perpetrated by a male employer, as women can sexually harass other women.

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As noted by the AAUW, a one-time occurrence of sexual conduct or a single remark is generally not enough to create what’s known as a hostile environment. To argue that a woman is being sexually harassed and therefore is working in a hostile environment, proof of a pattern of offensive behaviors is typically required. However, just one severe incident of harassment can potentially be enough to qualify as a violation. The more severe the harassment is, the less proof is needed, especially if the harassment is physical.

Withholding Promotions Or Bonuses

Particularly in a workforce where physical ability plays a role in daily tasks, women can potentially get snubbed for a promotion for a job that requires physical strength. It can be assumed that, because she’s a woman, she’s not physically capable of successfully completing the job. This is another form of discrimination because it cannot be automatically assumed the job cannot be completed based on gender without allowing the woman equal opportunity to prove her physical abilities.

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Other

Out of fear of missing out on a promotion or bonus, a woman working for the government or for a large company might feel she has to hide a pregnancy because of the 12 weeks’ maternity leave women in these jobs are allowed under the Family and Medical Leave Act. Additionally, women may avoid telling potential employers about their desire to have children for the same reason. There have also been situations in which a female faces discrimination because of her physical appearance. Some potential employers may hire women they personally find more attractive, arguing that those women are “likely to bring in more sales,” according to Lisa Finn, a writer for Our Everyday Life. On the other hand, an attractive female may not get hired because the employer is worried about how men in the workplace would react to her.

Despite the glass ceiling mentioned before, a woman with the same job title as a man, with the same seniority and responsibilities, should be paid equally. Otherwise, she’s being discriminated against. Employers found to be guilty of such discrimination can be sued under The Equal Pay Act of 1963. Consequences for the employer might include fines and the requirement to pay back lost wages.

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What Can You Do?

If you believe you are the victim or have been the victim of workplace discrimination, you should keep track of every case in which you felt you were being discriminated against. You should contact your employer’s human resources representative and inform them of the issue. You can also file a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but if they don’t find any proof of discrimination, the case will be closed. You then have 90 days to file your own lawsuit. There are several law firms that specialize in workplace discrimination and EEOC, such as Hutchison & Stoy, the “Warriors for Justice.”

Featured photo credit: salty_soul/Flickr via flickr.com

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Emily Hayden

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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