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Nanotechnology: The Next Frontier, Business and Global Market for Dentistry?

Nanotechnology: The Next Frontier, Business and Global Market for Dentistry?

Nanotechnology is the technology, engineering and science that is conducted at a nanoscale.[1] The first appearances of nanoscience and nanotechnology can be traced back to Physicist, Richard Feynman in a talk titled “There´s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” which is before the process and term came to be.

As it stands today, nanotechnology on a global scale is set to transform and revolutionize business. A Business Wire report confirmed that the global nanotechnology market is poised to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.1% over the next ten years to a market size of $173.95 billion by 2025.

Nano tech is going to have technological breakthroughs and advancements for the different branches in medicine. Particularly, the implementation of nanotechnology in dentistry will transform the business end of it, the profession, and how the materials are utilized to treat patients in the future.

As a result, we have nanodentistry. It is the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral or dental diseases. In addition, it is enhancing the dental health through nanostructured materials.

Contrary to popular belief there is a huge business component to dentistry. Becoming a licensed dentist is a rigorous process—years of study and a demanding amount of time investment in learning the profession.

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But there is an entrepreneurial aspect to this profession. A licensed dentist or dental professional must oversee the payroll, hiring, terminating and attracting enough patients’ business operations.[2]

From the early 1990s, nanotechnology has been exploited for medical and dental applications. This new form of nanodentistry has more than the potential to improve oral health. This would be possible thanks to the sophisticated, preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures of nanomaterials, biotechnology and nanorobot, as reported by the Journal of Orofacial Sciences.

Aspects of the profession will undergo a transformation. For example, the dental materials typically used for routine dental procedures may see combinations that include nanodiamonds, (which will discussed in the next section).

Adoption of nano dental materials and barriers to entry

Taking a step back, we now know nanotechnology is a science and its measurements at the nanometric scale, but just how much does it represent for gross domestic product (GDP)? The following infographic is an overview of nanotechnology and how much of the GDP it is:

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    The GDP of nanotechnology represented $1.5 trillion in 2015. So this nanotechnology cuts across multiple industries and different disciplines. That said, over the next five to ten years, adopting this technology remains pivotal for those in this sector of healthcare.

    What has been a recent novelty of nanotechnology is the enhancement properties and benefits it will bring to dentistry. As illustrated by a Forbes.[3]

    As explained by Guardian Dental,  nanotechnology brings with it a promising future. On the other hand, there are hurdles to overcome with regards to safety and cost barriers before it completes its introduction across the marketplace.

    Phys.org asserts it will not just help the creation of the next generation of dental materials. Since its introduction a decade earlier, engineers have been developing what materials can be used at a dental office. One strong possibility could include products like antimicrobial adhesives, which is made of nanotubes and could create a sort of a wearable toothpaste amongst other plausible nanodental materials.

    Naturally some of the components or, in this case, the composition can be toxic to healthy living cells. There is still plenty of research to be conducted, pre-clinical and clinical trials to test the safety of nanomaterials. Once approved, the scientific community can work with these dental-enhancing nanomaterials.

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    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) published a detailed journal on the present and future of nanotechnology in dentistry. These are additional challenges nanotechnology faces:

    “Precise positioning and manufacture of nanoscale parts.”

    “Cost-effective nanorobot mass manufacturing methods.”

    “Financing and tactical concerns.”

    “Inadequate assimilation of clinical research.”

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    Social issues of public acceptance, ethics, regulation and human safety.”

    The precise positioning and manufacturing of nanomaterials is still in its infancy stages. How it gradually gets introduced will largely depend on the government’s ability to offer subsidies combined with private capital funding. Furthermore, its general acceptance into this branch of medicine. Where the financing will come from will be a combination of public and private institutions. This will be subject to resistance, debate and even rejection.

    And the biggest hurdle is the public acceptance of it and how to carry out clinical trials on actual human beings. Before it clears approval it will be subject to regulation and will have to clear most safety concerns associated with it.

    Takeaways and conclusions

    Nanotechnology is set to grow substantially over the next decade. The technology will usher new nanocomposite dental materials that endure for long periods of time and effectively remedy dental diseases.

    Nanotechnology is already creating a revolution within healthcare, reshaping the disciplines as we speak.

    Infographic credit via balance.net

    Featured photo credit: Matthias Weinberger via Flickr via flickr.com

    Reference

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    Anthony Carranza

    Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

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    Last Updated on September 18, 2020

    7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

    7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

    Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

    Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

    1. Exercise Daily

    It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

    If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

    Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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    If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

    2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

    Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

    One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

    This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

    3. Acknowledge Your Limits

    Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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    Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

    Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

    4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

    Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

    The basic nutritional advice includes:

    • Eat unprocessed foods
    • Eat more veggies
    • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
    • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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    Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

      5. Watch Out for Travel

      Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

      This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

      If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

      6. Start Slow

      Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

      If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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      7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

      Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

      My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

      If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

      I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

      Final Thoughts

      Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

      Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

      More Tips on Getting in Shape

      Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

      Reference

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