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Nanotechnology: The Next Frontier, Business and Global Market for Dentistry?

Nanotechnology: The Next Frontier, Business and Global Market for Dentistry?

Nanotechnology is the technology, engineering and science that is conducted at a nanoscale.[1] The first appearances of nanoscience and nanotechnology can be traced back to Physicist, Richard Feynman in a talk titled “There´s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” which is before the process and term came to be.

As it stands today, nanotechnology on a global scale is set to transform and revolutionize business. A Business Wire report confirmed that the global nanotechnology market is poised to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.1% over the next ten years to a market size of $173.95 billion by 2025.

Nano tech is going to have technological breakthroughs and advancements for the different branches in medicine. Particularly, the implementation of nanotechnology in dentistry will transform the business end of it, the profession, and how the materials are utilized to treat patients in the future.

As a result, we have nanodentistry. It is the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral or dental diseases. In addition, it is enhancing the dental health through nanostructured materials.

Contrary to popular belief there is a huge business component to dentistry. Becoming a licensed dentist is a rigorous process—years of study and a demanding amount of time investment in learning the profession.

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But there is an entrepreneurial aspect to this profession. A licensed dentist or dental professional must oversee the payroll, hiring, terminating and attracting enough patients’ business operations.[2]

From the early 1990s, nanotechnology has been exploited for medical and dental applications. This new form of nanodentistry has more than the potential to improve oral health. This would be possible thanks to the sophisticated, preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic measures of nanomaterials, biotechnology and nanorobot, as reported by the Journal of Orofacial Sciences.

Aspects of the profession will undergo a transformation. For example, the dental materials typically used for routine dental procedures may see combinations that include nanodiamonds, (which will discussed in the next section).

Adoption of nano dental materials and barriers to entry

Taking a step back, we now know nanotechnology is a science and its measurements at the nanometric scale, but just how much does it represent for gross domestic product (GDP)? The following infographic is an overview of nanotechnology and how much of the GDP it is:

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    The GDP of nanotechnology represented $1.5 trillion in 2015. So this nanotechnology cuts across multiple industries and different disciplines. That said, over the next five to ten years, adopting this technology remains pivotal for those in this sector of healthcare.

    What has been a recent novelty of nanotechnology is the enhancement properties and benefits it will bring to dentistry. As illustrated by a Forbes.[3]

    As explained by Guardian Dental,  nanotechnology brings with it a promising future. On the other hand, there are hurdles to overcome with regards to safety and cost barriers before it completes its introduction across the marketplace.

    Phys.org asserts it will not just help the creation of the next generation of dental materials. Since its introduction a decade earlier, engineers have been developing what materials can be used at a dental office. One strong possibility could include products like antimicrobial adhesives, which is made of nanotubes and could create a sort of a wearable toothpaste amongst other plausible nanodental materials.

    Naturally some of the components or, in this case, the composition can be toxic to healthy living cells. There is still plenty of research to be conducted, pre-clinical and clinical trials to test the safety of nanomaterials. Once approved, the scientific community can work with these dental-enhancing nanomaterials.

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    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) published a detailed journal on the present and future of nanotechnology in dentistry. These are additional challenges nanotechnology faces:

    “Precise positioning and manufacture of nanoscale parts.”

    “Cost-effective nanorobot mass manufacturing methods.”

    “Financing and tactical concerns.”

    “Inadequate assimilation of clinical research.”

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    Social issues of public acceptance, ethics, regulation and human safety.”

    The precise positioning and manufacturing of nanomaterials is still in its infancy stages. How it gradually gets introduced will largely depend on the government’s ability to offer subsidies combined with private capital funding. Furthermore, its general acceptance into this branch of medicine. Where the financing will come from will be a combination of public and private institutions. This will be subject to resistance, debate and even rejection.

    And the biggest hurdle is the public acceptance of it and how to carry out clinical trials on actual human beings. Before it clears approval it will be subject to regulation and will have to clear most safety concerns associated with it.

    Takeaways and conclusions

    Nanotechnology is set to grow substantially over the next decade. The technology will usher new nanocomposite dental materials that endure for long periods of time and effectively remedy dental diseases.

    Nanotechnology is already creating a revolution within healthcare, reshaping the disciplines as we speak.

    Infographic credit via balance.net

    Featured photo credit: Matthias Weinberger via Flickr via flickr.com

    Reference

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    Anthony Carranza

    Multilingual writer and journalist covering all things technology and productivity.

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    Last Updated on March 13, 2019

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

    Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

    You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

    Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

    1. Work on the small tasks.

    When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

    Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

    2. Take a break from your work desk.

    Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

    Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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    3. Upgrade yourself

    Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

    The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

    4. Talk to a friend.

    Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

    Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

    5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

    If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

    Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

    Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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    6. Paint a vision to work towards.

    If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

    Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

    Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

    7. Read a book (or blog).

    The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

    Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

    Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

    8. Have a quick nap.

    If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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    9. Remember why you are doing this.

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

    10. Find some competition.

    Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

    11. Go exercise.

    Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

    Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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    Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

    12. Take a good break.

    Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

    Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

    More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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