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The Lessons Chess Can Teach Your Children

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The Lessons Chess Can Teach Your Children

Chess is one of the oldest, still-played games in the world. Developed in northern India in the 500s A.D., chess has been internationally popular for centuries. Every day, chess players around the world match wits in this complex battle of strategy and tactics.

Chess is not just a game, however. It can also be a tool. Teaching your child how to play it can aid in his or her intellectual and personal development in several ways. Here are just a few of the lessons that chess can teach your child.

How to think logically and strategically

Most people have to think strategically in the course of their daily lives. That might involve choosing how to best handle a case or client you’ve been assigned at work, mapping out the best route to and from work in the case of bad weather or traffic, or what to buy at the grocery store in order to get the most products for your dollar. All of these situations, from the most urgent and important to the most mundane, require some level of strategic thinking: pinning down the facts and analyzing how to act on the basis of that information.

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Children aren’t usually put into these kinds of situations, or at least not until they become old enough to be deemed ready for them. How will they develop the strategic minds they’ll need for the future? Many children’s games already feature quite a bit of strategy, but teaching them how to play chess certainly can’t hurt.

Chess was originally developed as a war game called chaturanga (“four divisions”) in Sanskrit. At the time, the pieces represented various kinds of military units, but even in its current form, the war connotations that chess holds are still obvious. Players must move their pieces around the board, attack and take enemy pieces, and defend their own pieces.

By learning how to play chess, children can better develop their strategic and analytical thinking skills. As they get more used to the game, they will learn which decisions are best to make in certain situations, and even how to predict their opponent’s thought processes and moves. Such developed skills make playing chess a valuable educational tool for your kids’ educational achievements as well as in their everyday life.

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The importance of competition

Competition is an unquestionable fact of life. People compete over test scores, over college spots, over jobs, and over recognition. Children who understand the importance of competition and winning tend to be more successful in life than those who don’t. While putting too much pressure on your children to win or be the best at everything they do can have a negative effect, your child should still understand, for the sake of his or her future success that competition exists in life and that it’s important for him or her to do his/her absolute best and to improve himself/herself constantly.

Some children are naturally competitive, whether in academics or sports. If your child is not, however, teaching him or her how to play chess can help light that spark within him/her.

Competition is the most essential part of chess – the entire game is a mental battle between two opponents. When a child begins to learn chess and starts playing games, he’ll/she’ll probably lose a lot in the beginning (unless he/she is a prodigy). You should encourage him/her to keep trying. By playing on a regular basis, he/she might start winning and experiencing the rewards of being successfully competitive.

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While a game of chess is usually very civil, competition lies at its core, and there’s hardly a better game out there to instill the competitive spirit in your child.

When to accept a loss and how to learn from it

Chess is a game of tactics, of strategy, and above all of reality. When your strategy fails and your opponent breaks through your defenses and your only remaining possible course of action involves taking your king and fleeing down the board to try to get out of multiple checks, you know you’re almost certainly beaten.

While there’s a lot to be said for the trait of persistence, it’s also important to know when you’ve been beaten. Everyone who’s lost a chess game has taken that truth to heart.

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Most children haven’t been exposed to the realities of adulthood, and as such they are often infinitely optimistic, even in the face of insurmountable obstacles.  However, they will eventually grow up and see the world for what it is, recognizing the fact that even despite their best efforts, things won’t always turn out the way they like. Losing at chess is a great way for children to learn this important lesson.

There is a brighter side to this depressing aspect of chess, however. Every loss at chess also teaches us how to improve upon our mistakes and achieve a better result the next time around. Once the chessboard is cleared off and the pieces are set back up, we can turn our losses to our advantage in the next game by using the lessons we’ve learned from them.

It’s just the same in life: every failure should be looked upon as a learning experience. Everybody fails at something and at some point in their lives; even kids who are great students and athletes aren’t guaranteed to continue winning forever. Children need to learn how to pick themselves up after a loss and, more importantly, how to learn from that loss, and chess is a good method to instill that lesson in them.

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Teaching your children how to play this complex and challenging game is a great way to bond with them and help them sharpen their minds. However, don’t forget that chess is, after all, a game, and that above all else it should be fun for your kids.

Featured photo credit: pixabay via cdn.pixabay.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

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How to Help Your Child to Get Better Grades

Children are most likely to say that they want to just lounge around or rest for a while after spending hours listening to lecture after lecture from their teachers. There is nothing wrong with this if they had a rough day.

What’s disturbing, is if they deliberately stay away from schoolwork or procrastinate when it comes to reviewing for their tests or completing an important science project.

When it seems that it is becoming a habit for your child to put off school work, it’s time for you to step in and help your child develop good study habits to get better grades. It is important for you to emphasize to your child the importance of setting priorities early in life. Don’t wait for them to flunk their tests, or worse, fail in their subjects before you talk to them about it.

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You can help your children hurdle their tests with these 7 tips:

1. Help them set targets

Ask your child what they want to achieve for that particular school year. Tell them to set a specific goal or target. If they say, “I want to get better grades,” tell them to be more specific. It will be better if they say they want to get a GPA of 2.5 or higher. Having a definite target will make it easier for them to undertake a series of actions to achieve their goals, instead of just “shooting for the moon.”

2. Preparation is key

At the start of the school year, teachers provide an outline of a subject’s scope along with a reading list and other course requirements. Make sure that your child has all the materials they need for these course requirements. Having these materials on hand will make sure that your child will have no reason to procrastinate and give them the opportunity to study in advance.

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3. Teach them to mark important dates

You may opt to give them a small notebook where they can jot down important dates or a planner that has dates where they can list their schedule. Ask them to show this to you so you can give them “gentle reminders” to block off the whole week before the dates of an exam. During this week, advise your child to not schedule any social activity so they can concentrate on studying.

4. Schedule regular study time

Encourage your child to set aside at least two hours every day to go through their lessons. This will help them remember the lectures for the day and understand the concepts they were taught. They should be encouraged to spend more time on subjects or concepts that they do not understand.

5. Get help

Some kids find it hard to digest or absorb mathematical or scientific concepts. Ask your child if they are having difficulties with their subjects and if they would like to seek the help of a tutor. There is nothing wrong in asking for the assistance of a tutor who can explain complex subjects.

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6. Schedule some “downtime”

Your child needs to relax from time to time. During his break, you can consider bringing your child to the nearest mall or grocery store and get them a treat. You may play board games with them during their downtime. The idea is to take his mind off studying for a limited period of time.

7. Reward your child

If your child achieves their goals for the school year, you may give them a reward such as buying them the gadget they have always wanted or allowing them to vacation wherever they want. By doing this, you are telling your child that hard work does pay off.

Conclusion

You need to take the time to monitor your child’s performance in school. Your guidance is essential to helping your child realize the need to prioritize their school activities. As a parent, your ultimate goal is to expose your child to habits that will lay down the groundwork for their future success.

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Featured photo credit: Annie Spratt via unsplash.com

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