Advertising
Advertising

Twelve Natural Ways to Enhance Brain Power

Twelve Natural Ways to Enhance Brain Power

Are you trying hard to boost your chances for a job interview, a test at school or just a desire to see your brain function at optimum capacity? There are natural ways to enhance your brain to ensure brilliance and increase in your productivity. In this article, we bring twelve natural ways to enhance your brain power:

Sleep

Getting enough sleep is important for your brain to work optimally. When you are deprived of sleep, your brain lags; this may affect your creativity, thinking, cognitive functioning, problem solving capacity and memory. At least eight hours of sleep is recommended every day for adults to boost brain power. Turn off any electronics at least thirty minutes before settling in bed to avoid stimulation of your brain before bed time. You can also take short power naps during the day if you feel like you did not get enough sleep.

Regular Physical Exercise

Physical exercise can help with the flow of oxygen to your brain, which will then help it function better. Physical exercises also help to improve your overall mood as well as protect your brain cells. Dance, martial arts, brisk walking, weight lifting, simple aerobic exercises will increase your heart rate, which gets blood flowing to your brain, thus keeping your memory sharp.

Advertising

Eat

Not just any food, but nutritious food to enhance your brain power. Leafy green vegetables, fish, whole grain, mushrooms, nuts, seeds, eggs, antioxidant rich berries, avocado and tomatoes are some of the brain boosting food you can indulge in. Also ensure you drink at least eight glasses of water a day. Foods rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium and complex carbohydrates help boost brain power.

Meditation

One of the many benefits of meditation  is its impact on brain function. Meditation can help to retrain the brain to work better. It increases mindfulness and concentration. You can find a place to sit quietly in the mornings. And even if it’s just for fifteen minutes, focus on breathing in and breathing out, making sure your thoughts are gently being directed by you. Meditation reduces stress and anxiety levels. Mindful meditation can delay cognitive decline and prevent diseases like dementia, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s.

Reduce Stress

Remember to relax. Stress contributes to memory loss and the destruction of brain cells. To relax, have a time out with friends, declutter your mind, visit relatives, read a book. Just generally find a way to let down your hair and keep out distractions.

Advertising

Learn a New Craft / Hobby

You could take an interest in photography, sewing or coding. Taking out time to learn a new interest or hobby can be a powerful way to enhance your brain power. Learning to play a musical instrument, a second or third language might be the boost your brain needs to enhance motor control, hearing and critical thinking skills.

Listen

Any time you find yourself involved in activities that require communication, practice your deep listening skills by focusing your mind and thoughts on what is being said. Take a pause, deep breaths, allow the words you hear settle into your mind, listen with your heart; notice how the words make you feel before you give a response.

Take Deep Breaths Regularly

Deep breathing helps to increase blood flow and oxygen levels, which in turn help your brain to function better. Take deep breaths into the bottom of your lungs, feel the air expanding your belly, then your chest and your lungs before breathing out.

Advertising

Herbs and Aromatherapy

Consider applying the oils directly onto your skin or use diffusers to aerate the oil. You can try rosemary oils for mental clarity and alertness, peppermint and basil oil to increase focus. Periwinkle and ginseng herbs may also improve cognitive functions. Gotu kola herb as well is considered to be an adaptogen, which means it can lower stress and boost brain power

Quit Multi-Tasking

Focus and concentrate on a single task at a time. Some people feel multi-tasking can make them get more work done in a short time. While this maybe true, multi-tasking also has the negative effect of confusing your brain. The brain needs about eight seconds to process a piece of information to your memory. So if you are talking on the phone, trying to take the trash out while also trying to cook dinner, chances are you may forget to complete one or more of these tasks. Make it a point of duty to concentrate on one task at a time.

Organize Your Space

If your living area is a mess, you are more likely to forget where you keep some of your things. It might be a good idea to declutter. Have a yard sale if you need to do so. All that mess sends the wrong signal to your brain and may make your brain lag.

Advertising

Think and Speak Positively

Speak positive ideas about yourself. It may look and sound strange at first but continuous practice will make it part of your lifestyle. Believe in your brain, believe in yourself, affirm yourself in positive ways frequently. Engage in some or all of these exercises and your brain will thank you for it.

Featured photo credit: Anete Lusina via unsplash.com

More by this author

Zuhair Sharif

Digital Marketer

5 Effective Pest Control Methods 7 Little-known Hacks for Bigger Arms 6 of the Best Dog Breeds for Emotional Support 5 Mind-blowing Health Benefits Of Playing Mobile Games 10 Essential Items To Check Off Your List When Going on A Business Trip

Trending in Brain

1 Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science 2 10 Positive Affirmations for Success that will Change your Life 3 7 Natural (And Highly Effective) Ways to Improve Memory 4 15 Ways Meditation Benefits Your Brain Power and Your Mood 5 How to Build Good Habits

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on September 10, 2018

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

Overcoming The Pain Of A Breakup: 3 Suggestions Based On Science

We thought that the expression ‘broken heart’ was just a metaphor, but science is telling us that it is not: breakups and rejections do cause physical pain. When a group of psychologists asked research participants to look at images of their ex-partners who broke up with them, researchers found that the same brain areas that are activated by physical pain are also activated by looking at images of ex-partners. Looking at images of our ex is a painful experience, literally.[1].

Given that the effect of rejections and breakups is the same as the effect of physical pain, scientists have speculated on whether the practices that reduce physical pain could be used to reduce the emotional pain that follows from breakups and rejections. In a study on whether painkillers reduce the emotional pain caused by a breakup, researchers found that painkillers did help. Individuals who took painkillers were better able to deal with their breakup. Tamar Cohen wrote that “A simple dose of paracetamol could help ease the pain of a broken heart.”[2]

Advertising

Just like painkillers can be used to ease the pain of a broken heart, other practices that ease physical pain can also be used to ease the pain of rejections and breakups. Three of these scientifically validated practices are presented in this article.

Looking at images of loved ones

While images of ex-partners stimulate the pain neuro-circuitry in our brain, images of loved ones activate a different circuitry. Looking at images of people who care about us increases the release of oxytocin in our body. Oxytocin, or the “cuddle hormone,” is the hormone that our body relies on to induce in us a soothing feeling of tranquility, even when we are under high stress and pain.

Advertising

In fact, oxytocin was found to have a crucial role as a mother is giving birth to her baby. Despite the extreme pain that a mother has to endure during delivery, the high level of oxytocin secreted by her body transforms pain into pleasure. Mariem Melainine notes that, “Oxytocin levels are usually at their peak during delivery, which promotes a sense of euphoria in the mother and helps her develop a stronger bond with her baby.”[3]

Whenever you feel tempted to look at images of your ex-partner, log into your Facebook page and start browsing images of your loved ones. As Eva Ritvo, M.D. notes, “Facebook fools our brain into believing that loved ones surround us, which historically was essential to our survival. The human brain, because it evolved thousands of years before photography, fails on many levels to recognize the difference between pictures and people”[4]

Advertising

Exercise

Endorphins are neurotransmitters that reduce our perception of pain. When our body is high on endorphins, painful sensations are kept outside of conscious awareness. It was found that exercise causes endorphins to be secreted in the brain and as a result produce a feeling of power, as psychologist Alex Korb noted in his book: “Exercise causes your brain to release endorphins, neurotransmitters that act on your neurons like opiates (such as morphine or Vicodin) by sending a neural signal to reduce pain and provide anxiety relief.”[5] By inhibiting pain from being transmitted to our brain, exercise acts as a powerful antidote to the pain caused by rejections and breakups.

Meditation

Jon Kabat Zinn, a doctor who pioneered the use of mindfulness meditation therapy for patients with chronic pain, has argued that it is not pain itself that is harmful to our mental health, rather, it is the way we react to pain. When we react to pain with irritation, frustration, and self-pity, more pain is generated, and we enter a never ending spiral of painful thoughts and sensations.

Advertising

In order to disrupt the domino effect caused by reacting to pain with pain, Kabat Zinn and other proponents of mindfulness meditation therapy have suggested reacting to pain through nonjudgmental contemplation and acceptance. By practicing meditation on a daily basis and getting used to the habit of paying attention to the sensations generated by our body (including the painful ones and by observing these sensations nonjudgmentally and with compassion) our brain develops the habit of reacting to pain with grace and patience.

When you find yourself thinking about a recent breakup or a recent rejection, close your eyes and pay attention to the sensations produced by your body. Take deep breaths and as you are feeling the sensations produced by your body, distance yourself from them, and observe them without judgment and with compassion. If your brain starts wandering and gets distracted, gently bring back your compassionate nonjudgmental attention to your body. Try to do this exercise for one minute and gradually increase its duration.

With consistent practice, nonjudgmental acceptance will become our default reaction to breakups, rejections, and other disappointments that we experience in life. Every rejection and every breakup teaches us great lessons about relationships and about ourselves.

Featured photo credit: condesign via pixabay.com

Reference

Read Next