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Need Help Reaching 100,000 Hits on Your Virtual Reality Video on YouTube?

Need Help Reaching 100,000 Hits on Your Virtual Reality Video on YouTube?

Yes, I said reach 100,000 hits.

This review will cover aspects of the Virtual Reality (VR) trend that is currently in the mainstream.

Neuroscience, psychology, and cognitive behavior tells us that curiosity, observation, and analysis of trends are key components to figuring out the madness that makes things viral.

1. Curiosity

What is it? The Cambridge dictionary says: “An eager wish to know or learn about something.” This definition could apply to well over 90% of the viewers on youtube.

Curiosity is just a word. The description of the word is the important factor, which will shape and determine the approach and eventual success of any youtube video.

Words like “arouse” and “excite” are very similar to the word “viral.” We could easily describe a popular YouTube video as, “it went into excite-mode,” or, “it aroused the public,” but of course these are not as pleasant to the ear as “it went viral.” We can direct and create material much easier by assessing the descriptive analysis of words that are normally associated with specific videos.

These key word descriptions bring forth imagery in the mind. The imagery will always be different and help to shape YouTube videos. If a person has an eager wish to know or learn about something, we already know they will be searching visuals that can key into the thought process of users who all have similar connections in terms of any niche market, such as virtual reality.

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The first, and probably most important, factor is the title picture (visual) associated with each youtube video. This picture must contain all the essential elements that are associated intimately with the VR market (i.e. common colors, phrases, and visuals). Big, bold, and unique images with a flair for nostalgia can capture a viewer’s imagination.

As a real world example, type in “funny VR games.” What comes up? I got these images (see below):

    I typed in “funny,” which has a word association description. That description is obvious to all of us; Miriam-Webster describes it as “differing from the ordinary in a suspicious, perplexing, quaint, or eccentric way.” All 4 of these images look exactly like what is being described in the Miriam-Webster definition of “funny.”

    What is common among 3 out of the 4 videos? Smiles and laughter. The most original and more intellectual image is number 3. “Richie’s Plank Experience,” suggests a story awaits us. This image is the best of the 4, and the views suggest it has over 4 million.

    The Potato cartoon character and younger generation user “boy” have more mass appeal than the dynamite and older male using the VR headset. The font on “escape” has already been used in the title. The re-use of this word serves no purpose other than the font type. The font type plays a role in how a viewer interprets the frenetic energy of the image. Richie’s Plank experience is probably the only image here that effectively uses fonts as a backdrop. The plank is placed over the words, which completely embodies the idea of walking on a questionable surface.

    The Title and Descriptions beside each image of course play key roles as support mechanisms for potential viewers. Let us compare at 273,000 hits for “FUNNIEST VIRTUAL REALITY GAME EVER!” versus 32,000 hits for “CAN WE ESCAPE THE PLANE?!?!” These two titles can’t compare. The one with more hits definitely caught my attention. It has the word “funniest,” which is exactly what I used in my search description. That word association is KEY to developing a connection with your viewers.

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    The title of the second video could be renamed “HILARIOUS ESCAPE ATTEMPTS WITH A PLANE?!?!” That title peaks my interest as a viewer. One can already visualize this plane game as something interesting. It also contains the humor element we were seeking in our search. Instead of using the word “can” which is so basic, we can turn it around and say “attempt,” which adds a new level of descriptive analysis and still keeps with the original intent.

    Does any of this really matter? For the sake of consistency, yes it does. Think about it: Nothing is successful long term, especially in the public eye, unless it has a solid foundation and approach that is unique and consistent.

    One thing to keep in mind here are subscribers: The 273,000 hits video has approximately 159,000 subscribers versus 1.88 million for the “ESCAPE” video.

    So we know already that the number of subscribers has nothing to do with the success of the videos.

    2. Observation

    The next key question to ask is how to retain viewers. How do you get someone who has clicked on your link to stay focused and watch? Entertainment value will be a key component here.

    Good content geared toward the original search idea is going to be key for success. Observation of the image and descriptions in the listings tell us that the HTC Vive Gameplay video is geared toward a younger crowd. This can be verified by clicking the actual videos and comparing.

    Okay, I just watched both videos for the first time. Yes, the first video, as suspected, has been marketed with a theme more applicable to a younger crowd. The host is using a modified voice, similar to that of a more mature individual we see on TV game shows. The host also sits in a more conventional way than the Oculus video. This conventional sitting position is much like what we see on TV today with shows like Ellen. The host here is taking center stage first, and then going heavily into full game immersion. The game itself is much more entertaining and involved.

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    The gameplay with the Oculus rift is actually not funny at all. The host is trying to call it funny, but this game deserves a different title all together. The host seems disingenuous in his attempt to describe the hilarity of the game, whereas the HTC host does a great job opening up with a description, and actually entering into gameplay without trying to change what the game is by using their own personality.

    The game relates more to a thriller/adventure type movie compared to the HTC game, which is completely comedy, plus adventure. The voice-overs on the HTC game add quite a special feeling. After watching the content, it is obvious why more hits were given to the HTC game. Question is, could the other game have been developed with better game play?

    Yes it could have! But how you ask? The game itself is flawed in so many ways. It has a lack of excitement, curiosity, etc.; it’s just a person sitting in a car with no voice-overs outside of the odd computer generated voice asking for a retinal scan or an emergency signal. If this car was in a plane, how about adding to the excitement by having the plane shift – moving from left to right, then settle and so forth.

    The list of things wrong with this game can’t be denied. If anything, this game deserved a more reserved approach on the part of the host. The premise of the idea suggests that you are a secret agent of some sort stuck in a plane with a ticking time bomb and other obstacles. The host could have taken the time to add in some key components of a made up story, for instance.

    Being a secret agent is probably the coolest thing ever, so this game should have done much better in terms of YouTube hits and viewership. Comparatively speaking, the lack of setup content by the game and host, along with bad use of images and descriptions caused a lack of hits.

    3. Trends and Analysis

    VR is currently the new Atari of the 80’s. Progression and acceptance throughout the world will be slow but penetrating. As YouTubers, there is still time for users to enter this market trend.

    According to statistics provided by Touchstone Research Innovation & Excellence:

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    • 79% of people have heard of virtual reality
    • 68%, when asked, revealed a basic understanding of what VR is
    • 47% know some or a lot about VR.

    Of this test group, Samsung, Oculus, and the Sony Project Morpheus retained a product knowledge rate of more than 30%:

    • 88% of kids said VR is “off-the-charts” cool
    • 80% are very/really excited about the things they might be able to do with VR
    • 78% are very/super interested in knowing more about VR and new devices.

    Half of the test group expressed concerns about radiation, dizziness, headaches, heavy headsets, loss of limb control (bumping, tripping, falling), and addiction to VR.

    The top picks for things to do in VR:

    • Visit another country (64%)
    • Explore a place they could not (64%)
    • Go on an adventure (52%)
    • Travel back in time (58%)
    • Visit a fantasy world (61%)
    • Watch a VR movie (55%)
    • Play a game/online app by themselves (57%)

    Life games had the highest rating approval at 51% versus 34% for online role playing games.

    How strong is the potential of VR with kids and teens? 85% said they would tell their friends about VR, 79% want to learn more, and 75% will ask for a VR device if priced within the gaming console range.

    Virtual reality is definitely a trend, and in the current focus of the public.

    More by this author

    praveen nadaraju

    Classical & Computer Animator & Industrial Designer

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    Last Updated on March 30, 2020

    How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

    How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

    You may have heard someone say they are “totally right brained” or that they’re “a left brained person.”

    There is a pervasive myth that’s been making its rounds for over a century: people have two hemispheres of their brains, and if they have a dominant left brain, they’re more analytical; and if they have a dominant right brain, they are more creative.

    Before we go debunking this theory and then giving some tips for how people can access their creative brain centers, let’s first take a look at where the left brain/right brain lateralization theory comes from.

    The Left Brain/Right Brain Lateralization Theory

    In the 1800s, scientists discovered that when patients injured one side of their brains, certain skills were lost.[1] Scientists linked those different skills to one side of the brain or the other. Thus began the left brain/right brain myth that continues to this day.

    Then, in the 1960s and 70s, Roger W. Sperry led 16 operations that cut the corpus callosum (the largest region that connects both brain hemispheres together) in order to try to treat patients’ epilepsy. Sperry wrote about the differences in the two hemispheres as a result of those surgeries.[2]

    Sperry’s work was popularized in 1973 with a New York Times article about his lateralization theory—that people were either right brained (read: logical) or left brained (read: creative). From here, Sperry won the Nobel Prize for his work and numerous other publications spread the right brain/left brain myth.

    Debunking the Right Brain/Left Brain Myth

    If anything, the lateralization theory of the brain is a gross exaggeration. It is true that people have two hemispheres of their brains. It is also true that there are differences in the composition of those two hemispheres.

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    However, the hemispheres are actually much more interconnected than Sperry’s work initially made it seem.

    In a 2013 study,[3] scientists scanned over 1000 people’s brains, checking for lateralization. They confirmed that certain brain functions occur predominately in one hemisphere or the other but that, in reality, the brain is actually much more interconnected and complex than the right brain/left brain lateralization theory makes it seem.[4][5]

    A New Metaphor for Right Brain/Left Brain

    How do we get past this right brain/left brain myth?

    First, let’s look at what contemporary cognitive science says about brain regions, and creative and logical modes of thinking.

    My background is as an improviser and improv researcher. I wrote Theatrical Improvisation, Consciousness, and Cognition and think looking at improvisation and the brain can shed light on a new model for talking about unlocking the brain’s creative potential.

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans have shown that while trained improvisers improvise (musically on a keyboard, rapping, and comedic improvisation) an interesting shift happens in their brain activity. [6]

    A region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases in activity and creative language centers such as the medial prefrontal cortex increase in activity. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is linked with conscious thoughts—that inner voice that tells you not to say something or criticizes you when you do.

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    The medial prefrontal cortex is among the brain regions linked with creativity. So, instead of thinking about right brain and left brain, perhaps it’s more current and correct to think about more specific brain regions instead of hemispheres. Perhaps, it’s more useful to think about which activities and strategies will allow us to inhibit our dorsolateral prefrontal cortexes and allow our medial prefrontal cortexes to flourish.

    How to Enhance Your “Right Brain” — Creativity

    Whether we’re talking about right brain versus left brain, creative versus logical, or medial prefrontal cortex versus dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, we still know enough to talk about strategies to tap into your creative brain’s full potential.

    So, now that we’ve dispelled the right brain/left brain myth and looked at a more contemporary, cognitive neuroscience theory of brain regions and creativity centers, let’s look at how to tap into the potential of your creative brain.

    1. Performing Arts

    One way to tap into your creative brain centers is to participate in the performing arts. Whether you improvise, act, or dance, the performing arts allow you an embodied experience that will help you snap out of your habitual, logical thoughts.

    Another benefit of the performing arts is that it changes your attention. Attention and creativity are inextricably linked. When we improvise, act, or dance, we have to focus intently on our fellow performers. This means we are forced to focus less on our conscious, logical thoughts. This frees us up for more creative thinking and expression.[7]

    One of the conclusions of my research on improvisation is that focusing intensely on fellow improvisers and the task at hand makes it more likely that we experience a flow state. Dr. Csikszentmihalyi,[8] a Professor of Psychology and Management defines flow as an optimal psychological state when our skills match the difficulty of the task at hand. Our perception of time is altered as we get into the zone and become more present and in the moment during our chosen activity.[9]

    A flow state is a creative state. It’s the opposite of crunching numbers and forcing ourselves to work out a problem with the conscious regions of our brain. So, get up, improvise, act, or dance to access your creativity.

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    2. Visual Art

    Art teacher Betty Edwards[10] wrote a book called Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Here again, we see that a shift in our attention can lead us to an increase in our creative thinking.

    Edwards’ book gives art students tricks to shift the way they see the world. For example, one exercise encourages students to literally flip whatever it is they’re drawing upside down before they draw it. This forces budding artists to literally see the object in a new way. This shift allows them to focus more on the individual components and patterns of the object, which allows them to draw it better.

    Shifting how we see things is another way we can access our creative brain centers. Take an art class to shut off your conscious, critical thoughts and start seeing things from a new, more creative perspective.

    3. Zone Out

    If there’s one thing creativity doesn’t like, it’s being coerced.

    I think we’ve all felt that awful feeling of trying to force ourselves to be creative. When we force it, we’re really trying to force our logical brain regions to be creative. It’s like asking your gardener to perform your appendix surgery. It’s just not what she does.

    Instead, stop forcing it. Take a break. Take a long walk or a relaxing bath or shower. Let your mind wander.

    Whatever you do, stop forcing it. This break lets your creative centers rise to the surface of your attention and get heard.

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    4. Practice Mindfulness

    The final trick to start accessing your so-called right brain is to practice mindfulness.

    Now, there’s a lot of different ways to go about mindfulness. You can take a more physical approach with a yoga class. Or you can try meditating to become more aware and in tune with your thoughts and feelings: Meditation for Beginners: How to Meditate Deeply and Quickly

    You could also try to incorporate fun mindfulness exercises[11] into your everyday routine like forcing yourself to go on detours or pretending you’re a detective who needs to examine people and places closely.

    Any way you do it, mindfulness exercises and training can help you become better versed in how your brain works and what your normal thought process is like on a day-to-day basis. If we’re ever going to reach our optimal creativity, we have to become an expert in how our individual brain functions. Mindfulness is one way to become your very own brain expert.

    Mindfulness also has added benefits like calming us, slowing our breathing, and helping us become more observant, which are also great ways to start tapping into our creative potential.

    Final Thoughts

    So, it may not be correct to say that our right brain is our creative brain, but it is still a valid pursuit to try to optimize our creative brain centers.

    The key to do so is to relax, become observant, shift your perspective, move your body, try something new, and, whatever you do, don’t force it.

    Creativity can feel slippery. It can abandon us when we need it most, but by slowing down and looking at things from a new perspective, we can give ourselves a better chance of tapping into our ultimate creativity, even if that doesn’t exactly mean our “right brain.”

    More Tips on Boosting Creativity

    Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

    Reference

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