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10 Tips For Traveling in Europe With Class on a Budget

10 Tips For Traveling in Europe With Class on a Budget

Historic architecture, beautiful art, scenic beaches, and exciting adventures; these are just a few of the reasons that Europe is a dream vacation destination for many. Sadly, many people go their entire lives without visiting a single country on this continent. The reason is usually expense.

Yes, travel can be expensive, and it can be difficult to fit it in when budgets are tight. Many people forego travel because they fear that budget travel means boring travel. Nothing could be further than the truth when traveling in Europe.

1. Rethink Your Lodging Options And Use Airbnb

When you think about traveling with class, luxury hotels may come to mind. Unfortunately, those are expensive. Why spend your money on lodging when you could be spending it on food and entertainment? In addition to that, staying in a hotel guarantees that you will have to rely on restaurants and room service to feed yourself.

Instead, check out alternatives such as Airbnb or even luxury boutique hostels. Airbnb may be more expensive if you look at price alone. However, when you consider that you will have a kitchen and in some cases laundry facilities, that’s likely to help you save a big chunk of change.

Are you traveling with family? You can spread out in a small home or cottage much more easily than you can a double suite.

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2. Search For Package Deals

Many cities and attractions use package deals to encourage tourists to spend their time and money there. For example, you may be able to get a day pass that provides you with free public transportation, admission into any museum or attraction, and maybe even a meal discount. That includes the Budapest Card, Barcelona City Pass and more.

If you go into a large attraction such as a zoo or amusement park, see if they offer discount day passes. It will usually cost less than paying for each individual activity as you get to it.

On a final note, consider using a travel agency. Yes, you can certainly book all of your own travel, but do some price comparisons. A travel agent may just have connections to behind-the-scenes deals that the general public does not.

3. Consider Traveling to Alternative Cities

Remember that the more popular a city is, the more expensive it is going to be. Cities such as Paris and Rome are absolutely gorgeous, and there is plenty to see and do. However, they are pricey and often crowded. Fortunately, there are plenty of cities that are just as amazing that you can visit on a budget.

For example, consider Granada over Barcelona or Lyon over Paris. You’ll still enjoy an amazing experience and have money for other expenses.

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Another alternative to consider is rethinking the countries that you choose to visit. Spain is absolutely beautiful, but so is Portugal. You’ll find that Portugal is also much less expensive. Check out Hungary, Serbia, Albania and other countries that are often overlooked by travellers.

4. Use These Handy Tips to Save Money on Flights

Here are some mini life hacks that you can use to save money when booking flights:

  • Sign up for frequent flyer miles on several different airlines and accumulate the miles before your trip. You can then use them towards class upgrades or even completely free tickets. The best airline reward cards are ranked here.
  • Opt in to receive marketing emails from airlines and travel companies to get notified about special promos. Additionally, you may want to sign up for deal alerts at Fly4Free and Airfare Watchdog. Both websites publish a great selection of daily promos and incredibly cheap error fares.
  • Remember that flying business class could be more affordable than you think. Again, there are websites that will help you find affordable fares like Let’s Fly Cheaper.
  • Fly into larger airports. There are plenty of cheap flights to huge hubs like London or Paris, but you may have a hard time getting an affordable rate for smaller cities like Porto or Geneve. Hence, consider flying to a larger city and then switching to a local/low-cost carrier to get to your destination.
  • Fly with a stopover— again, this is an excellent way to save some cash and visit another city. Some airlines like Icelandair, Finnair and Turkish Airlines offer free international stopovers up to a week long.

For most people, airfare represents a huge chunk of their travel budget. Saving money here can be pretty significant.

5. Walk or Use Public Transportation

Not only is renting a car expensive, you also have to consider fuel costs and parking. In addition to this, many cities in Europe aren’t very car friendly in the first place. Whenever possible, opt for walking, biking, or use public transportation. While public transportation is very hit or miss in the United States, it is generally reliable in cities in Europe.

You may find yourself needing to call a cab once or twice, but you will still save money by walking past the rental car counter at the airport.

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6. Dine Out at Local Restaurants

It’s tempting to visit restaurants owned by celebrity chefs, expensive local chains, fine dining establishments, and other expensive restaurants. But, what do you really get for your money? The food sold at restaurant chains is often made miles away, frozen, and simply reheated. Celebrity chefs are great cooks, but it’s not likely that they will be cooking for you. You’ll probably also find that the dishes they serve are their interpretations of local dishes.

Instead, consider dining at locally owned restaurants. You’ll save money, eat among the locals, and be more likely to experience traditional cuisine. As an added bonus, your dollars will directly benefit local business owners and workers. Post a few questions on expat Facebook groups or check out recommendations on Spotted by Locals.

7. Visit the Bureau of Tourism at Each Destination

When you arrive at each destination, search for the local bureau or tourism or other similar organization. The folks at these places are very willing to point you in the direction of inexpensive dining, attractions, and entertainment. In some cities, museums, theaters, zoos, and other attractions will pass along coupons and other discounts to people who stop by the local ministry of tourism.

If your trip happens to coincide with a local event, they will have all the information you need as well. This is also where you will want to go when inquiring about the bundled discounts listed above.

8. Shop Currency Exchange Rates

First of all, never exchange your currency at the airport. Instead, wait until you are in the city to take care of that particular task. However, don’t stop at the first currency exchange that you see. Some will charge significantly more than others.

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Whenever possible, check out the exchanges that are a bit further away from city centers. You’ll probably get a much better rate.

9. Travel in The Off Season

For the most part, you can expect most European cities to be crowded and more expensive. However, you have to do a bit more research to discover the true off season for each country, even for each city.

For example, February to March is generally a great time to visit Rome. However, make a note of holidays such as Easter in Rome, as you are going to struggle with both cost and crowds. Know which events and holidays could cause a temporary tourism boom in what would normally be the off season.

10. Eat at The Market

Beautiful farmer’s markets are abundant in Europe. Even better, they feature goods beyond fruits and vegetables. At many of these markets you can find the following items:

  • Cheese and bread
  • Wine and soft drinks
  • Hot prepared foods such as sandwiches or kabobs
  • Fruit and vegetables prepared to eat

Take advantage of this! Why spend money eating at an expensive restaurant looking at beautiful scenery when you can make an inexpensive picnic lunch from what you find at the market. Then, you can eat while you are immersed in the scenery rather than simply looking at it.

To save money while still creating an amazing vacation experience, you’ll need to focus on keeping costs down in various areas. These include airfare, transportation, accommodations, dining, and activities. A good rule of thumb is to pick one or two areas that you see as being non-negotiable.

For example, if you are a foodie, you may want to spend extra money to eat in the best restaurants. By all means do this, just find another area where you are willing to cut costs. You will eventually find a balance that allows you to enjoy a great vacation on a budget.

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Elena Prokopets

Elena is a passionate blogger who shares about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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