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3 Photo Editing Tools to Bring You into the Social Media Limelight

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3 Photo Editing Tools to Bring You into the Social Media Limelight

Editing photos for social media is an art form that’s becoming increasingly popular, both among personal users and among photographers looking to sell images across digital platforms.

One of the challenges specific to editing for social media is that your images will only have a fraction of a second to stand out. Think about the way you browse Facebook or Instagram – you probably swipe through images quickly and only pause if something looks interesting.

If you need to create attention-grabbing images with a Mac, then here’s the software you’re going to need.

Photolemur

One of the challenges you’ll face in generating great social media photography is maintaining consistency. Having a distinctive visual style works well for both personal and commercial users, but where do you start?

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Photolemur is a drag-and-drop app for Mac that allows you to automatically add a distinctive style to batches of photos.

The technology reads the images you upload, finds areas for potential enhancement, and then applies changes. You can then amplify or reduce the changes with a simple slider.

Although this isn’t a traditional photo editing suite, it is a great starting point for showing off your artistic eye and releasing batches of consistent, beautiful imagery.

This isn’t the answer if you’d like to become a professional social media photographer, but it is an easy way to explore photographic enhancement and get more likes online.

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Photoscape

If you’re looking for a bit more creative freedom, then Photoscape is a great starting point. This solid suite allows you to:

  • View images as stacked thumbnails
  • Experiment with the Page, Combine, and Splitter features
  • Edit the image brightness, tone color, and so on
  • Create GIFS, capture your screen, and convert files
  • Print according to a set of popular templates.

For a free software program, Photoscape has a great range of options. You’ll need many of them to become a great social media photographer.

The editing range makes it worth considering – although Photoshop and similar programs offer slightly more depth, Photoscape does deliver more than enough to stamp your style on the social media space.

One issue with the software is the UX (User Experience). The circular navigation is a little jarring, and it takes a little getting used to.

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If you are looking for an affordable, simple way to access the powerful tools you will need to stand out on social media, then this might be for you.

Luminar

If you have any kind of editing experience, then you know exactly how important precision is, especially if you are looking to drive business on social media.

Luminar is arguably the best software out there if you’re looking for precision and control when editing photography, regardless of the end publishing platform.

Developed over 10 years ago by a team of experts, this program is the best $70 you’re likely to spend as a photographic wizard. With its more than 300 features and tools, you can create works of art regardless of your editing experience.

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The suite is best understood as a digital darkroom, but because it’s based in advanced technology, it adapts itself to suit your needs and style. The program understands your style, knowledge, and approach, and it will prompt and teach you how best to use it for your desired effect.

Stand-out features include:

  • Basic filters
  • Layering
  • Film and color conversion
  • Filter masking
  • And even Touch Bar support.

Add to this a fantastic website and support, and it’s clear to see why this is such a popular choice.

Time to stand out

Although each photographer and designer has his or her own approach and needs, these programs are the best way to use your Mac to make magic.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels / RawPixel via pexels.com

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Annie Qureshi

Entrepreneur

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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