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Things You Should Know Before Buying a Drone

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Things You Should Know Before Buying a Drone

Drones are becoming quite popular these days, especially if you’re a filmmaker or potential social media icon (which is pretty much everybody, if you ask me). We all want to make the most out of our creative projects, and drones allow you to get some of the most amazing shots ever – but that doesn’t mean you know everything. As a matter of fact, we’re going to talk about a few things you should know before you even consider buying a drone.

Drones are essentially little machines that can fly through the air with ease, capturing amazing footage in the process. It’s been used time and time again for various YouTube projects and has become one of the more common pieces of equipment being used for videography these days. They allow you to capture lush-looking landscapes as well as stuff you would never be able to see without a drone – that is unless you could fly around the sky with a heavy film-camera on your shoulder. It’s expected that well over a million drones will be sold this Christmas, and the number is going to grow exponentially as time progresses.

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Before you go about buying a drone, it helps to understand what the product itself can achieve – as well as how you’re supposed to be using it. Paying over a thousand dollars for a drone and then not understanding how to use it just seems sort of silly, right? Not only that, but there are certain rules that need to be followed when operating a drone. Certain places within the United States don’t permit the use of drones, and it could lead to a fine (or even worse, jail time). The drone debate is still slugging on, as people from opposite sides of the argument are constantly trying to dig up more evidence. Some say drones are good, and others say it is bad – I say it’s up for you to decide.

Not Every Drone is Easy to Fly

Drones, as a matter of fact, are quite hard to pilot. If you aren’t well-off and need to conserve your finances, buying a drone and crashing it to the ground on the first day isn’t exactly ideal. To make the most out of your purchased drone, you have to know how to fly it; which won’t always be easy. There are drones out there that feature flight controls, one that would mimic an RC racer of sorts; but there are others that can be much more complicated (or even worse, a lack of complication). Some drones allow you to pilot them through the use of your smartphone; all you’ve got to do is download a specific app and you’re good to go.

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That’s good for people that don’t want a massive controller to be used, but it also takes away from the precision of control that you can work with. Not only that, but when there’s no controller included, odds are it’s going to be one of the cheaper drone varieties you can find. Quadcopters are hard to fly, so imagine some of the more quirky and powerful drones that they’re releasing today! The Phantom 3, Inspire 1 and even Q500 4K would be the easiest drones you could fly today (in my opinion).

Not only are they not easy to fly, but not every single drone is going to come ready to fly. The RTF acronym stands for Ready-to-Fly, while BNF stands for Bind-and-Fly (with ARF for Almost-ready-to-Fly). ARF models call for a few components to be purchased on a personal level and are usually for connoisseurs. There are even waterproof drone options out there!

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There Are Tons of Vendors

If you don’t like the vendor prices you see at a specific place, never fear – there are plenty of vendors located all over the map that carry drones and drone-related products. Hobby King is a large chain of stores that sell plenty of drone parts, as well as many other accessories. Larger retailers can be found in both China and the United States, but that doesn’t mean other regions will be completely void when it comes to providers.

Investments May Be Necessary

If you’re an enthusiast, you may need to make a much bigger investment than you initially thought. Going about buying motors and transmitters is good fun, but it can get expensive (and fast!). Investments aren’t always a must, but when you start to develop a deeper passion for flying drones, it’s something that just comes around. Start off easy, and if you’re serious about your drone flying process, you can begin to invest more and more towards your projects. Not only will you be investing money, but time as well. Situations like purchasing a waterproof drone because you’re worried about splashing would be worth it!

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Bilal Khoja

System Engineer

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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