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You Can Boost Your Brain & Mental Health If You Use Your Non-Dominant Hand Often

You Can Boost Your Brain & Mental Health If You Use Your Non-Dominant Hand Often

Stuck in a rut at work, getting frustrated with your home life, or simply need a little mental pick me up? This simple tip could help.

Experts have found that doing exercises as simple as brushing your teeth with your left hand instead of your right can have positive long-term effects on your well-being and can strengthen your brain. With this exercise you will find you are more able to control your temper, be calmer and react to stress more positively, and even stave off other mental difficulties some of us meet later in life, such as Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Using your non-dominant hand

It’s quite simple, really – just begin doing everyday tasks such as eating or brushing your teeth – only using the hand you don’t normally use. So, if you use your right hand for eating your cereal, use your left, and vice versa. You can do this with any number of activities, and it’s up to you how much you incorporate it into your life. The more you do it, the more effective it will be and the bigger difference it will make to your brain long-term.

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Here are a few ideas of how you can use you non-dominant:

  • stirring your coffee
  • opening doors
  • hoovering
  • writing
  • texting
  • drawing
  • swiping dates on tinder
  • and so on. -Pretty much anything that is safe to do will work.

Neurobics — the mindfulness technique

There is a scene in The Peaceful Warrior in which the budding gymnast student realizes that each moment in life is precious, and that each moment matters. This idea can be distilled into the more scientifically based phrase: ‘neurobics’. These are exercises that keep your mind agile and also keep you in the moment, more aware of your senses than ever before. Using your non-dominant (hand) fits into this category, helping us see life in new and different ways.

Neurobics can be likened to mindfulness techniques, as both bring our attention more intensely to our sensations as we go through life. This is a handy tip if you don’t feel like meditation is the thing for you right now, but you’d like to take some action to feeling more balanced in life. If you are more balanced mentally, your life will automatically feel more in balance physically and emotionally, too.

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Avoiding memory loss

We are often encouraged to try memory exercises to keep our brains agile, but fortunately, we can swap hands without buying any expensive gizmos and without taking any time out from our day!

Using your brain, like using and developing any muscle, makes it stronger and more accessible. Much like other new learnt skills, (such as learning a new language) using the non-dominant hand has a similar effect in terms of growing your brain’s strength (like all other neurobic activities), can help with avoiding age-related challenges such as Alzheimer’s.[1]

Self-control and aggression

This tip can help develop our levels of self-control. Something we could all do a little more of when we’re wanting to shout at our boss or swear at the guy who just cut across us when driving to work.

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Levels of aggression shown seem to be directly linked with how much self-control we individually have. Which makes sense. if you can’t control your temper, you are more likely to fly off the handle when someone eats the last profiterole, for example.

In Dr Thomas Denson’s study,[2] he found that practicing this tip for just two weeks led participants to have higher levels of self-control, and also, consequently, to have more ability to react in a less aggressive manner.

Creating possibilities

The special thing about this tip is that it has been proven to actually stimulate and develop certain parts of the brain in a positive way.[3] This workout for the brain means that it runs better than ever before. As Dr P. Murali Doraiswamy (of Duke University Medical Centre) said, it is like “having more cell towers in your brain to send messages along. The more cell towers you have, the fewer missed calls.” More brain connections mean more ideas, and more possibilities in your life.

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Amazing what such a small change can do. So, if you’re needing a mental pick-me-up, I urge you to try it out, even just for a day; see how you feel, and see how life comes alive.

Featured photo credit: Joanna Kosinska via unsplash.com

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Daniel Owen van Dommelen

Coder, Director, Writer, Human

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Published on July 29, 2020

How to Build Strategic Thinking Skills for Effective Leadership

How to Build Strategic Thinking Skills for Effective Leadership

Have you been thinking of how you can be a more strategic leader during these uncertain times? Has the pandemic thrown a wrench at all your carefully laid out plans and initiatives?

You’re not alone. The truth is, we all want some stability in our careers and teams during this disruptive pandemic.

However, this now requires a bit more effort than before and making the leap from merely surviving to thriving means buckling down to some serious strategic thinking and maintaining a determined mindset.

Is There a Way to Thrive Despite These Disruptions?

Essentially – yes, although you need to be willing to put in the work. Every leader wants to develop strategic thinking skills so that they can enhance overall team performance and boost their company’s success, but what exactly does it mean to be strategic in the context of the times we live in?

If you happen to be in a leadership position in your organization right now, you are most probably navigating precarious waters given the disruptions caused by the pandemic. There’s a lot more pressure than before because your actions and decisions will have a much greater impact these days not just on you, but also to the people who are part of your team.

Companies often bring me in to coach executives on strategic thinking and planning. And while pre-pandemic I would usually start by highlighting the advantages of strategic thinking, nowadays, I always begin these Zoom coaching sessions by driving home the point that this pandemic has now made strategic thinking not just an option but an absolute must.

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Assessing and making plans through the lens of a good strategy might require significant work at first. Nevertheless, you can take comfort in the fact that the rewards will far outweigh the effort, as you’ll soon see after following the 8 strategic steps I have outlined below.

8 Steps to Strategic Thinking

As events unfold during these strange times, you’re bound to feel wrong-footed every now and then. Being a leader during this pandemic means preparing for more change not just for you, but for your whole team as well.

As states and cities go through a cycle of lockdowns and reopening, employees will experience the full gamut of human emotions in dizzying speed, and you will often be called on to provide insight and stability to your team and workplace.

Strategic thinking is all about anticipation and preparation. Rather than expending your energy merely helping your company put out fires and survive, you can put the time to better use by charting out a solid plan that can protect and help you and your company thrive.

Take the following steps to build solid initiatives and roll out successful projects:

Step 1: Step Back, Then Set the Scope

One of the things that leaders get wrong during their first attempt at strategic thinking is expecting that it is just another item on a checklist. The truth is, you need to take a good, long look at the bigger picture before anything else. This means decisively prioritizing and stepping away from tasks that can be delegated to others. Free up your schedule so you can focus on this crucial task at hand.

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Then, proceed with setting the scope and the strategic goals of the project or initiative you plan to build or execute. Ask yourself the bigger question of why you need to embark on a particular project and when would be the right time to do so.

You need to set a timeline as well, anywhere from 6 months to 5 years. Keep in mind that your projections will deteriorate the further out you go as you make longer-term plans.

For this reason, add extra resources, flexibility, and resilience if you have a longer timeline. You should also be making the goals less specific if you’re charting it out for the longer term.

Step 2: Make a List of Experts

Make and keep a list of credible people who can contribute solid insight and feedback to your initiative. This could range from key stakeholders to industry experts, mentors, and even colleagues who previously planned and rolled out similar projects.

Reach out to the people on this list regularly while you work through the steps to bring diverse insight into your planning process. This way, you will be able to approach any problem from every angle.

Bringing key stakeholders into this initial process will also display your willingness to listen and empathize with their issues. In return, this will build trust and potentially pave the way for smoother buy-in down the line.

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Step 3: Anticipate the Future

After identifying your goals and gathering feedback, it’s time to consider what the future would look like if everything goes as you intuitively anticipate. Then, lay out the kind and amount of resources (money, time, social capital) that might be needed to keep this anticipated future running.

Step 4: Brainstorm on Potential Internal and External Problems

Next, think of how the future would look if you encountered unexpected problems internal and external to the business activity that seriously jeopardize your expected vision of the future. Write out what kind of potential problems you might encounter, including low-probability ones.

Assess the likelihood that you will run into each problem. To gauge, multiply the likelihood by the number of resources needed to address the problem. Try to convert the resources into money if possible so that you can have a single unit of measurement.

Then, think of what steps you can take to address these internal and external problems before they even happen. Write out how much you expect these steps might cost. Lastly, add up all the extra resources that may be needed because of the different possible problems and all the steps you committed to taking to address them in advance.

Step 5: Identify Potential Opportunities, Internal and External

Imagine how your expected plan would look if unexpected opportunities came up. Most of these will be external but consider internal ones as well. Then, gauge the likelihood of each scenario and the number of resources you would need to take advantage of each opportunity. Convert the resources into money if possible.

Then, think of what steps you can take in advance to take advantage of unexpected opportunities and write out how much you expect these steps might cost. Finally, add up all the extra resources that may be needed because of the different unexpected opportunities and all the steps you committed to taking to address them in advance.

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Step 6: Check for Cognitive Biases

Check for potential cognitive biases that are relevant to you personally or to the organization as a whole, and adjust the resources and plans to address such errors.[1] Make sure to at least check for loss aversion, status quo bias, confirmation bias, attentional bias, overconfidence, optimism bias, pessimism bias, and halo and horns effects.

Step 7: Account for Unknown Unknowns (Black Swans)

To have a more effective strategy, account for black swans as well. These are unknown unknowns -unpredictable events that have potentially severe consequences.

To account for these black swans, add 40 percent to the resources you anticipate. Also, consider ways to make your plans more flexible and secure than you intuitively feel is needed.

Step 8: Communicate and Take the Next Steps

Communicate the plan to your stakeholders, and give them a heads up about the additional resources needed. Then, take the next steps to address the unanticipated problems and take advantage of the opportunities you identified by improving your plans, as well as allocating and reserving resources.

Finally, take note that there will be cases when you’ll need to go back and forth these steps to make improvements, (a fix here, an improvement there) so be comfortable with revisiting your strategy and reaching out to your list of experts.

Conclusion

A great way to deal with feelings of uncertainty during this pandemic is to anticipate obstacles with a good plan – and a sure road to that is practicing strategic thinking.

In the coming months and years, you’ll need to continue navigating uncharted territory so that you can lead your team to safe waters. Regularly doing these 8 steps to strategic thinking will ensure that you can prepare for and adapt  to the coming changes with increasing clarity, perspective, and efficiency.[2]

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Featured photo credit: JESHOOTS.COM via unsplash.com

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