Advertising
Advertising

If You Start To Travel More Often, You Can Grow Your Brain

If You Start To Travel More Often, You Can Grow Your Brain

Ready to expand your mind?  Give you brain a boost in power? Then it is time to pack your bags and take a trip. Venture out of the concrete jungles and get ready to explore. As your flight takes off and you know what is next. Trillions of new experiences.You just cannot wait. Life is awesome! The world waits. Neurogenesis sprouts out when you travel to complex, novel, and new surroundings.

But First Off, Stop with the Excuses

When people hear about traveling experiences they enviously spurt out ‘You are so lucky, I wish I could…’ and follow up with excuses of paying their bills, etc. What it amounts to is just that–excuses.

Many may think traveling is way out of range for them, expensive and out of financial barriers. Agreed that it is not free, however you do not have to be a millionaire to see many places and build up a wealth of lifetime memories. It is not an impossible fantasy exclusively for the rich.

Advertising

Some Practical Saving Tips

If you cannot take a trip to Vietnam why not explore a town nearby or tour your own town? Analyze your bank statements; there should be at least something on your monthly expenditure list that you can sacrifice if you save the amounts you spend on weekend takeaways for a year; it will afford a trip you always dreamt about. But if you just work, eat, sleep and pay bills never making time to travel or even share time with friends and family what does your existence amount to?

How Traveling Impacts You

Traveling is about close encounters with an unusual and new situation. It may be simply finding your way around the surroundings or ordering a meal in a language you not very familiar with. Studies have confirmed[1]the physical and mental benefits of traveling: social engagement, cognitive stimulation, and physical activity.

Traveling will awaken you to the realization that there are many different cultures and ways of life. You burst with new experiences and insight. New experiences boost cognitive health; your active brain creates new connections as it programs the unusual stimuli into categories. Plunging to explore the world will be an exercise you will not regret.

Advertising

Paul Nussbaum from the University of Pittsburg, a neurological surgery professor has affirmed that traveling grows the capacity of the brain as the challenges start to sprout dendrites, which are extensions. Surprisingly, travel relays the stress of being thrust out of normal daily routines, as your brain is ignited to react and engage attentively.

Where to Start

Although reaching mountain summits or strolling medieval cities can entice you, start with a simple weekend trip away from work or home. The experience and memories stay engraved and unforgettable.

Travel Opens up Our Minds

According to William Maddux, Ph.D. and his party found that people are more creative when they are integrated into new cultures[2]. When your mind opens up into the realms of different ideas, you become more creative.

Advertising

Toby Israel the author of Someplace like Home iterates that traveling is about reflecting on our lives from a physical and metaphorical distance. This helps us to assess our lives clearly.

Just How Amazing Travel is for your Brain

Anticipating a vacation sprouts a higher level of happiness than a new shirt according to a Psychological Science Journal. Researchers affirm that waiting for experiences equals to a higher level of happiness than mere material objects.[3]

A  US Travel Association recent study found that people who take vacation days have higher chances of being promoted at work than those rigidly staying behind their desks.[4]

Advertising

Travel is about meeting people, intellectual stimulation via exploring new and interesting things, and new information stretching our understanding of the world. It increases the neural connections and enhances stimulating activity like problem-solving, education, occupational learning. Studies reveal that students living abroad are more likely to solve computer tasks than students who did not travel. [5]

We’ll leave you with a quote by Mark Twain, “Innocents Abroad”

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”

Featured photo credit: pixabay via cdn.pixabay.com

Reference

More by this author

Nena Tenacity

Nena is passionate about writing. She shares her everyday health and lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

Here Are 30+ Easy High Fibre Breakfast Ideas You Can Try At Home A Wholesome Diet Is What You Need to Gain Happiness: 30 Natural Low-Carb Foods 10 Best Healthy Snacks That Even Gym People Eat When They’re Hungry! Want A Quick Yet Healthy Breakfast? Avocado Toast Is Your New Breakfast Idea Want To Look Younger And Be Healthier? Acai Berry Is Your New Breakfast Idea!

Trending in Brain

1 How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way 2 How to Improve Memory: 7 Natural (And Highly Effective) Ways 3 11 Tactics on Increasing Brain Power, Memory, and Motivation 4 How to Increase Brain Power, Boost Memory and Become 10X Smarter 5 How to Improve Brain Memory Naturally: Foods to Eat And Skip

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 5, 2019

How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

How to Memorize a Speech the Smart Way

Did you know that 75% of the population suffers from glossophobia? That scary sounding word is one of the most common phobia’s in the world, fear of public speaking.

I’ll bet even as you are reading this, you are getting nervous thinking about giving a speech.

I have got good news for you. In this article, I will share with you a step by step method on how to memorize a speech the smart way. Once you have this method down, your confidence in yourself to deliver a successful speech will increase substantially. Read on to feel well prepared the next time you have to memorize and deliver a speech.

Common Mistakes of Memorizing a Speech

Before we get to the actual process of how to memorize a speech the smart way, let’s look at the two most common mistakes many of us tend to make while preparing for a speech.

Complete Memorization

In an attempt to ensure they remember every detail, many people aim to completely memorize their speech. They practice it over and over until they have every single word burned into their brain.

In many ways, this is understandable because most of us are naturally frightened of having to give a speech. When the time comes, we want to be completely and totally prepared and not make any mistakes.

While this makes a lot of sense, it also comes with its own negative side. The downside to having your speech memorized word for word is that you sound like a robot when delivering the speech. You become so focused on remembering every single part that you lose the ability to inflect your speech to varying degrees, and free form the talk a bit when the situation warrants.

Lack of Preparation

The other side of the coin to complete memorization is people who don’t prepare enough. Because they don’t want to come off sounding like a robot, they decide they will mostly “wing it”.

Sometimes they will write a few main points down on a piece of paper to remind themselves. They figure once they get going, the details will somehow fill themselves in under the big talking points while they are doing the talking.

The problem is that unless this is a topic you know inside and out and have spoken on it many times, you’ll wind up missing key points. It’s almost a given that as soon as you are done with your speech, you’ll remember many things you should have brought up while talking.

Advertising

There’s a good balance to be had between over and under preparing. Let’s now look at how to memorize a speech the smart way.

How to Memorize a Speech (Step-by-Step Guide)

1. Write Out Your Speech

The first step in the process is to simply write out your speech.

Many people like to write out the entire speech. Other people are more inclined to write their speech outline style. Whichever way your brain works best is the way you should write your speech.

Personally, I like to break things down into the primary points I want to make, and then back up each major point with several details. Because my mind works this way, I tend to write out speeches, and articles for that matter, by doing an outline.

Once I have the outline completed, I will then fill in several bullet points to back up each big topic.

For instance, if I was going to give a speech on how to get in better shape my outline would look something like this:

Benefits of being in shape

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Exercise

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Diet

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

Rest and hydration

Advertising

  • Point #1
  • Point #2
  • Point #3

ConclusionNo need for points here, just a few sentences wrapping things up.

As you might imagine, this step typically is the hardest because it’s not only the first step but it also involves the initial creation of the speech.

2. Rehearse Your Speech

Now that you’ve written your speech, or outline, it’s time to start saying it out loud. It’s completely fine to simply read what you’ve written line by line at this point. What you are working on doing is getting the outline and getting a feel for the speech.

If you’ve written the entire speech out, you’ll be editing it while you are rehearsing it. Many times as we say things out loud, we realize that what we wrote needs to be changed and altered. This is how we work towards having a well rounded and smooth speech. Feel free to change things as needed while you are rehearsing your speech.

If you are like me and you’ve written the outline, this is where some of the supporting bullet points will begin to come out. Normally, I will have written several bullet points under each main topic. But as I say it out loud, I will begin to fill in more and more details. I might scratch certain bullet points and add others. I might think of something new at this stage while I am listening to myself and want to add it.

The key to remember here is that you laying the foundation for your awesome speech. At this point, it’s a work in progress, you are getting the key pieces in place.

3. Memorize the Bigger Parts

As you are rehearsing your speech, you want to focus on memorizing the bigger parts, or the main points.

Going back to my example of how to get in better shape, I’d want to ensure I have memorized my primary points. These include the benefits of being in shape, exercise, diet, rest and hydration, and the conclusion. These are the main points I want to make and I will then fill in further details. I’ve got to ensure I know these very well first and foremost.

By practicing your major points, you are building the framework for your speech. After you have this solid outline in place, you’ll continue by adding in the details to round things out.

4. Fill In the Details

Now that you have the big chunks memorized, it’s time to work on memorizing the details. These detail points will provide support and context for your major points. You can work on this all at once or break it down to the details that support each major point.

Advertising

For example, the details I might have under the “exercise” big point might include such things as cardio, weights, how many times a week to exercise, how long to actually exercise, and several examples of actual exercises. In this example, I have 5 detail points to memorize to support my major point of “exercise”.

It’s a good idea to test yourself regularly as you are rehearsing your speech. Ask yourself:

What are the 5 detail points I want to talk about that support my 3rd main point?

You need to be able to fire those off quickly. Until you can do this, you won’t be able to associate each of the details with the main point.

You have to be able to have them grouped together in your mind so that it comes out naturally in your speech. So that when you think of main point #2, you automatically think of the 4 supporting details associated with it.

Keep working at this stage until you can run through your speech completely several times and remember all of your big points and the supporting details.

Once you can do that with relative ease, it will be time for the final step, working on your delivery.

5. Work on Your Delivery

You’ve got the bulk of the work done now. You’ve written your speech and rehearsed enough times to have not only your main points memorized but also your supporting details. In short, you should have your speech almost done.

There’s one more step in how to memorize a speech the smart way. The final component is to work on how you deliver your speech.

For the most part, you can go give your speech now. After all, you have it memorized. If you want to ensure you do it right, you’ll want to hone how you are delivering your speech.

Advertising

You work on your delivery by rehearsing and running through it a number of times and making tweaks along the way. These tweaks or changes may be are’s where you’d want to pause for effect.

If you’ve found you have used one word 5 times in one paragraph, you might want to swap it out for a similar word a few times to keep it fresh.

Sometimes while working on this part, I’ve thought of a great story that’s happened to me that I can incorporate to make my point even better.

When you work on your delivery, you are basically giving your speech a personality as well.

The Bottom Line

And there you have it, a step by step approach on how to memorize a speech the smart way.

The next time you are asked to give a speech don’t let glossophobia rear its familiar head. Instead, remember this easy to use guide to help craft a powerful speech.

Using the method shown here will help you deliver your next speech with increased confidence.

More About Public Speaking

Featured photo credit: Anna Sullivan via unsplash.com

Read Next