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If You Want To Learn Everything 100% Faster, Try This Science-Backed Approach

If You Want To Learn Everything 100% Faster, Try This Science-Backed Approach

For most people, no matter what new skill they want to acquire, learning consists of hard work that is repeated daily for many hours until the skill is mastered. The same principle is applied to learning to play the piano, for example, or learning a new language. Hard and constant work plays an important part in mastering any skill, yet, as one study finds, our success in learning can be much faster if we vary our practice slightly.[1]

The varying practice approach

Together with his fellow researchers, Pablo A. Celnik, M.D., professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted research among 68 people on the effects of modified practice when learning computer-based motor skills. The conclusions they came to speak in favor of the varying practice approach, since the performance level of the group using this approach almost doubled the performance level of the group that used the regular learning approach. Celnik explains how a process called reconsolidation, in which new information and knowledge help recall existing memories, can now help motor skill development. He emphasizes the importance of the findings for helping patients with neurological conditions to recover lost motor function. “The goal is to develop novel behavioral interventions and training schedules that give people more improvement for the same amount of practice time.”

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How it works

In the fast paced modern world we live in, it seems like time is our most valuable resource, and most of us seem to lack it. With the developments in technology happening rapidly, most of us are forced into learning new skills constantly and quickly. The varying practice approach is so effective, simply because it actually saves our precious time and helps us cope with demanding tasks in a more productive way. Based on the reconsolidation process, the approach provides faster learning that requires:

  1. Practicing the activity
  2. Taking a 6 hour break (which is the time needed for the reconsolidation of memories)
  3. Repeating the activity with minor modifications

It is very important not to alter the practice entirely, as it won’t have any effect on the performance. As Celnik suggests: “If you make the altered task too different, people do not get the gain we observed during reconsolidation. The modification between sessions needs to be subtle.” Based on our ability to reconsolidate memories, the approach works in a way that helps our learned skills be remembered much quicker, and upgraded. When we slightly alter the practicing activity, it triggers our existing memories and helps imprint the new ones faster than during a regular approach consisting of repetition of the same activity.

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Additionally, changing things up as we learn a new skill can enhance our creativity. As earlier studies have shown, our creativity levels become stale if we keep repeating the same process over and over. Instead, we can see the benefits to our creativity, even from making the slightest alteration, such as changing our every day route to work.

How to implement the varying practice approach

As most of us struggle with time management when it comes to learning new skills, applying the varying practice approach will most certainly prove beneficial to many people. The implementation principle is quite simple, actually. Similar to the regular practice approach, it requires hard work and dedication, yet the rewards of the learned skill won’t take that long to be achieved.

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If we take learning how to play tennis as an example, our practice should follow the mentioned pattern with two practicing sessions, with a 6-hour break in between. Minor alteration in this case would be, as Celnik suggests, changing the size or weight of a tennis racket in between practice sessions. With subtle variations, our practicing sessions become twice as effective.

Featured photo credit: Eric Bailey via pexels.com

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Reference

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Ana Erkic

Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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Last Updated on November 12, 2020

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

The truth about many of our failed goals is that we haven’t achieved them because we didn’t know how to set and accomplish goals effectively, rather than having not had enough willpower, determination, or fortitude. There are strings of mistakes standing in our way of accomplished goals. Fortunately for us, we don’t have to fall victim to these mistakes for 2015. There are many common mistakes we make with setting goals, but there are also surefire ways to fix them too.

Goal Setting

1. You make your goals too vague.

Instead of having a vague goal of “going to the gym,” make your goals specific—something like, “run a mile around the indoor track each morning.”

2. You have no way of knowing where you are with your goals.

It’s hard to recognize where you are at reaching your goal if you have no way of measuring where you are with it. Instead, make your goal measurable with questions such as, “how much?” or “how many?” This way, you always know where you stand with your goals.

3. You make your goals impossible to reach.

If it’s impossible of reaching, you’re simply not going to reach for it. Sometimes, our past behavior can predict our future behavior, which means if you have no sign of changing a behavior within a week, don’t set a goal that wants to accomplish that. While you can do many things you set your mind to, it’ll be much easier if you realize your capabilities, and judge your goals from there.

4. You only list your long-term goals.

Long-term goals tend to fizzle out because we’re stuck on the larger view rather than what we need to accomplish in the here and now to get there. Instead, list out all the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal. For instance, if you want to seek a publisher for a book you’ve written, your short-term goals might involve your marketing your writing and writing for more magazines in order to accomplished your goal of publishing. By listing out the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal, you’ll focus more on doing what’s in front of you.

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5. You write your goals as negative statements.

It’s hard to reach a goal that’s worded as, “don’t fall into this stupid trap.” That’s not inspiring, and when you’re first starting out, you need inspiration to stay committed to your goal. Instead, make your goals positive statements, such as, “Be a friend who says yes more” rather than, “Stop being an idiot to your friends.”

6. You leave your goals in your head.

Don’t keep your goals stuck in your head. Write them down somewhere and keep them visible. It’s a way making your goals real and holding yourself accountable for achieving them.

Achieving Goals

7. You only focus on achieving one goal at a time, and you struggle each time.

In order to keep achieving your goals, one right after the others, you need to build the healthy habits to do so. For instance, if you want to write a book, developing a habit of writing each morning. If you want to lose weight and eventually run a marathon, develop a habit of running each morning. Focus on buildign habits, and your other goals in the future will come easier.

Studies show that it takes about 66 days on average to change or develop a habit.[1] If you focus on forming one habit every 66 days, that’ll get you closer to accomplishing your goals, and you’ll also build the capability to achieve more and more goals later on with the help of your newly formed habits.

8. You live in an environment that doesn’t support your goals.

Gary Keller and Jay Papasan in their book, The One Thing, state that environments are made up of people and places. They state that these two factors must line up to support your goals. Otherwise, they would cause friction to your goals. So make sure the people who surround you and your location both add something to your goals rather than take away from them.

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9. You get stuck on the end result with your goals.

James Clear brilliantly suggests that our focus should be on the systems we implement to reach our goals rather than the actual end result. For instance, if you’re trying to be healthier with your diet, focus more on sticking to your diet plan rather than on your desired end result. It’ll keep you more concentrated on what’s right in front of you rather than what’s up in the sky.

Keeping Motivated

10. You get discouraged with your mess-ups.

When I wake up each morning, I focus all my effort in building a small-win for myself. Why? Because we need confidence and momentum if we want to keep plowing through the obstacles of accomplishing our goals. Starting my day with small wins helps me forget what mess-ups I had yesterday, and be able to reset.

Your win can be as small as getting out of bed to writing a paragraph in your book. Whatever the case may be, highlight the victories when they come along, and don’t pay much attention to whatever mess-ups happened yesterday.

11. You downplay your wins.

When a win comes along, don’t downplay it or be too humble about it. Instead, make it a big deal. Celebrate each time you get closer to your goal with either a party or quality time doing what you love.

12. You get discouraged by all the work you have to do for your goals.

What happens when you focus on everything that’s in front of you is that you can lose sight of the big picture—what you’re actually doing this for and why you want to achieve it. By learning how to filter the big picture through your every day small goals, you’ll be able to keep your motivation for the long haul. Never let go of the big picture.

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13. You waste your downtime.

When I take a break, I usually fill my downtime with activities that further me toward my goals. For instance, I listen to podcasts about writing or entrepreneurship during my lunch times. This keeps my mind focused on the goal, and also utilizes my downtime with motivation to keep trying for my goals.

Wondering what you can do during your downtime? Here’re 20 Productive Ways to Use the Time.

14. You have no system of accountability.

If you announce your goal publicly, or promise to offer something to people, those people suddenly depend on your accomplishment. They are suddenly concerned for your goals, and help make sure you achieve them. Don’t see this as a burden. Instead, use it to fuel your hard work. Have people depend on you and you’ll be motivated to not let them down.

15. You fall victim to all your negative behaviors you’re trying to avoid with your goals.

Instead of making a “to-do” list, make a list of all the behaviors, patterns, and thinking you need to avoid if you ever want to reach your goal. For instance, you might want to chart down, “avoid Netflix” or “don’t think negatively about my capability.” By doing this, you’ll have a visible reminder of all the behavior you need to avoid in order to accomplish your goals. But make sure you balance this list out with your goals listed as positive statements.

How To Stop Failing Your Goal?

If you want to stop failing your goal and finally reach it, don’t miss these actionable tips explained by Jade in this episode of The Lifehack Show:

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Bottom Line

Overcoming our mistakes is the first step to building healthy systems for our goals. If you find one of these cogs jamming the gears to your goal-setting system, I hope you follow these solutions to keep your system healthy and able to churn out more goals.

Make this year where you finally achieve what you’ve only dreamed of.

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Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

Reference

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