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If You Want To Learn Everything 100% Faster, Try This Science-Backed Approach

If You Want To Learn Everything 100% Faster, Try This Science-Backed Approach

For most people, no matter what new skill they want to acquire, learning consists of hard work that is repeated daily for many hours until the skill is mastered. The same principle is applied to learning to play the piano, for example, or learning a new language. Hard and constant work plays an important part in mastering any skill, yet, as one study finds, our success in learning can be much faster if we vary our practice slightly.[1]

The varying practice approach

Together with his fellow researchers, Pablo A. Celnik, M.D., professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted research among 68 people on the effects of modified practice when learning computer-based motor skills. The conclusions they came to speak in favor of the varying practice approach, since the performance level of the group using this approach almost doubled the performance level of the group that used the regular learning approach. Celnik explains how a process called reconsolidation, in which new information and knowledge help recall existing memories, can now help motor skill development. He emphasizes the importance of the findings for helping patients with neurological conditions to recover lost motor function. “The goal is to develop novel behavioral interventions and training schedules that give people more improvement for the same amount of practice time.”

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How it works

In the fast paced modern world we live in, it seems like time is our most valuable resource, and most of us seem to lack it. With the developments in technology happening rapidly, most of us are forced into learning new skills constantly and quickly. The varying practice approach is so effective, simply because it actually saves our precious time and helps us cope with demanding tasks in a more productive way. Based on the reconsolidation process, the approach provides faster learning that requires:

  1. Practicing the activity
  2. Taking a 6 hour break (which is the time needed for the reconsolidation of memories)
  3. Repeating the activity with minor modifications

It is very important not to alter the practice entirely, as it won’t have any effect on the performance. As Celnik suggests: “If you make the altered task too different, people do not get the gain we observed during reconsolidation. The modification between sessions needs to be subtle.” Based on our ability to reconsolidate memories, the approach works in a way that helps our learned skills be remembered much quicker, and upgraded. When we slightly alter the practicing activity, it triggers our existing memories and helps imprint the new ones faster than during a regular approach consisting of repetition of the same activity.

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Additionally, changing things up as we learn a new skill can enhance our creativity. As earlier studies have shown, our creativity levels become stale if we keep repeating the same process over and over. Instead, we can see the benefits to our creativity, even from making the slightest alteration, such as changing our every day route to work.

How to implement the varying practice approach

As most of us struggle with time management when it comes to learning new skills, applying the varying practice approach will most certainly prove beneficial to many people. The implementation principle is quite simple, actually. Similar to the regular practice approach, it requires hard work and dedication, yet the rewards of the learned skill won’t take that long to be achieved.

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If we take learning how to play tennis as an example, our practice should follow the mentioned pattern with two practicing sessions, with a 6-hour break in between. Minor alteration in this case would be, as Celnik suggests, changing the size or weight of a tennis racket in between practice sessions. With subtle variations, our practicing sessions become twice as effective.

Featured photo credit: Eric Bailey via pexels.com

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Reference

More by this author

Ana Erkic

Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

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Last Updated on November 19, 2019

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

“Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

“Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

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The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

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If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

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6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

So, How To Get out of Busyness?

Take a look at these articles to help you get unstuck:

Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

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