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4 Tips to Boost Your Content Marketing Strategy With Video Content

4 Tips to Boost Your Content Marketing Strategy With Video Content

Also called inbound marketing, content marketing gives businesses a way to attract customers who are already seeking solutions that the company’s services or products can offer. Businesses use text, graphics, and of course, videos to attract attention and increase interest. Since video consumes the bulk of internet usage, it’s only sensible to consider offering the kind of content that potential customers are likely to favor. Video content marketing offers all of the advantages of text and graphics, so that it can both show and communicate an idea or tell an engaging story.

In particular, video marketing has received a lot of attention lately because of its effectiveness and popularity with internet users, and here are the reasons for that:

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  • Better conversion rates. According to Hubspot, adding a video to a sales page can boost conversion rates by as much as 80 percent.[1]
  • More social shares. Additionally, over 90 percent of mobile device users say they share videos with other people.
  • Increased internet traffic. According to YouTube, video consumption on this site has just about doubled each year.

4 Exciting Ways to Benefit From Video Content Marketing

    Image Via  Animatron.com

    Could your company’s marketing offer you a better ROI if you added video content?[2] Consider some tested ways to utilize videos in order to increase website traffic, bring in more leads, and close more deals:

    1. Use video to improve SEO

    Major search engines have begun to reward quality content, lower bounce rates, and higher CTRs. These are all benefits that videos on your website can provide. In addition, YouTube, the video site that Google owns, ranks only behind Google in the number of searches that its own search engine handles. Videos that rank well on YouTube also tend to rank very well in Google. It might help to produce shorter videos for social networks and YouTube, and then to include longer and more in-depth content on the company’s website.

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    2. Incorporate videos into newsletters and other online correspondence

    Videos don’t just enjoy a higher CTR when they are found in searches; they also boost the performance of emails and other online messages.[3] Consider adding videos to your newsletter, promotional emails, and even text messages. Make sure the subject line of the message highlights the value of the video inside. If the content delivers that value, your ROI from subscribers should skyrocket.

    3. Use videos to enhance sales promos

    If you intend to offer a promotional sale in order to boost revenues, it only makes sense to make your content marketing of that promotional effort as effective as possible. Why does video improve conversions? It helps increase the amount of time that visitors stay on a page and reduces bounce rates. This gives you more time to communicate your marketing message. At the same time, videos offer an effective way to communicate very well in a short amount of time.

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    4. Make videos to improve customer service

    Do online customers have trouble with your order process or frequent questions about the best ways to use your products? You can offer videos to help overcome these potential problems that can disrupt a sales funnel. This content can help enhance your customer service without forcing you or your team to spend more time answering emails or fielding phone calls. Helpful content can help you close more sales and turn new customers into repeat customers.

    It’s The Time to Benefit From Video Content Marketing

      Image Via Animatron.com

      Perhaps video is so effective because it combines words and graphics in a way that internet users find engaging. It appeals to both audio and visual learners. Whatever the reason, this kind of content has been proven to help generate more website visits and keep those visitors engaged longer. While your marketing strategy may also make use of text and pictures, you shouldn’t overlook the power of effective marketing with videos. Successful marketers will test out a mix of different types of content to find the perfect blend for their own campaigns.

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      Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pexels.com

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      George Olufemi O

      Information Technologist

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      Last Updated on March 30, 2020

      How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

      How to Tap into Your Right Brain’s Potential

      You may have heard someone say they are “totally right brained” or that they’re “a left brained person.”

      There is a pervasive myth that’s been making its rounds for over a century: people have two hemispheres of their brains, and if they have a dominant left brain, they’re more analytical; and if they have a dominant right brain, they are more creative.

      Before we go debunking this theory and then giving some tips for how people can access their creative brain centers, let’s first take a look at where the left brain/right brain lateralization theory comes from.

      The Left Brain/Right Brain Lateralization Theory

      In the 1800s, scientists discovered that when patients injured one side of their brains, certain skills were lost.[1] Scientists linked those different skills to one side of the brain or the other. Thus began the left brain/right brain myth that continues to this day.

      Then, in the 1960s and 70s, Roger W. Sperry led 16 operations that cut the corpus callosum (the largest region that connects both brain hemispheres together) in order to try to treat patients’ epilepsy. Sperry wrote about the differences in the two hemispheres as a result of those surgeries.[2]

      Sperry’s work was popularized in 1973 with a New York Times article about his lateralization theory—that people were either right brained (read: logical) or left brained (read: creative). From here, Sperry won the Nobel Prize for his work and numerous other publications spread the right brain/left brain myth.

      Debunking the Right Brain/Left Brain Myth

      If anything, the lateralization theory of the brain is a gross exaggeration. It is true that people have two hemispheres of their brains. It is also true that there are differences in the composition of those two hemispheres.

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      However, the hemispheres are actually much more interconnected than Sperry’s work initially made it seem.

      In a 2013 study,[3] scientists scanned over 1000 people’s brains, checking for lateralization. They confirmed that certain brain functions occur predominately in one hemisphere or the other but that, in reality, the brain is actually much more interconnected and complex than the right brain/left brain lateralization theory makes it seem.[4][5]

      A New Metaphor for Right Brain/Left Brain

      How do we get past this right brain/left brain myth?

      First, let’s look at what contemporary cognitive science says about brain regions, and creative and logical modes of thinking.

      My background is as an improviser and improv researcher. I wrote Theatrical Improvisation, Consciousness, and Cognition and think looking at improvisation and the brain can shed light on a new model for talking about unlocking the brain’s creative potential.

      Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans have shown that while trained improvisers improvise (musically on a keyboard, rapping, and comedic improvisation) an interesting shift happens in their brain activity. [6]

      A region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreases in activity and creative language centers such as the medial prefrontal cortex increase in activity. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is linked with conscious thoughts—that inner voice that tells you not to say something or criticizes you when you do.

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      The medial prefrontal cortex is among the brain regions linked with creativity. So, instead of thinking about right brain and left brain, perhaps it’s more current and correct to think about more specific brain regions instead of hemispheres. Perhaps, it’s more useful to think about which activities and strategies will allow us to inhibit our dorsolateral prefrontal cortexes and allow our medial prefrontal cortexes to flourish.

      How to Enhance Your “Right Brain” — Creativity

      Whether we’re talking about right brain versus left brain, creative versus logical, or medial prefrontal cortex versus dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, we still know enough to talk about strategies to tap into your creative brain’s full potential.

      So, now that we’ve dispelled the right brain/left brain myth and looked at a more contemporary, cognitive neuroscience theory of brain regions and creativity centers, let’s look at how to tap into the potential of your creative brain.

      1. Performing Arts

      One way to tap into your creative brain centers is to participate in the performing arts. Whether you improvise, act, or dance, the performing arts allow you an embodied experience that will help you snap out of your habitual, logical thoughts.

      Another benefit of the performing arts is that it changes your attention. Attention and creativity are inextricably linked. When we improvise, act, or dance, we have to focus intently on our fellow performers. This means we are forced to focus less on our conscious, logical thoughts. This frees us up for more creative thinking and expression.[7]

      One of the conclusions of my research on improvisation is that focusing intensely on fellow improvisers and the task at hand makes it more likely that we experience a flow state. Dr. Csikszentmihalyi,[8] a Professor of Psychology and Management defines flow as an optimal psychological state when our skills match the difficulty of the task at hand. Our perception of time is altered as we get into the zone and become more present and in the moment during our chosen activity.[9]

      A flow state is a creative state. It’s the opposite of crunching numbers and forcing ourselves to work out a problem with the conscious regions of our brain. So, get up, improvise, act, or dance to access your creativity.

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      2. Visual Art

      Art teacher Betty Edwards[10] wrote a book called Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Here again, we see that a shift in our attention can lead us to an increase in our creative thinking.

      Edwards’ book gives art students tricks to shift the way they see the world. For example, one exercise encourages students to literally flip whatever it is they’re drawing upside down before they draw it. This forces budding artists to literally see the object in a new way. This shift allows them to focus more on the individual components and patterns of the object, which allows them to draw it better.

      Shifting how we see things is another way we can access our creative brain centers. Take an art class to shut off your conscious, critical thoughts and start seeing things from a new, more creative perspective.

      3. Zone Out

      If there’s one thing creativity doesn’t like, it’s being coerced.

      I think we’ve all felt that awful feeling of trying to force ourselves to be creative. When we force it, we’re really trying to force our logical brain regions to be creative. It’s like asking your gardener to perform your appendix surgery. It’s just not what she does.

      Instead, stop forcing it. Take a break. Take a long walk or a relaxing bath or shower. Let your mind wander.

      Whatever you do, stop forcing it. This break lets your creative centers rise to the surface of your attention and get heard.

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      4. Practice Mindfulness

      The final trick to start accessing your so-called right brain is to practice mindfulness.

      Now, there’s a lot of different ways to go about mindfulness. You can take a more physical approach with a yoga class. Or you can try meditating to become more aware and in tune with your thoughts and feelings: Meditation for Beginners: How to Meditate Deeply and Quickly

      You could also try to incorporate fun mindfulness exercises[11] into your everyday routine like forcing yourself to go on detours or pretending you’re a detective who needs to examine people and places closely.

      Any way you do it, mindfulness exercises and training can help you become better versed in how your brain works and what your normal thought process is like on a day-to-day basis. If we’re ever going to reach our optimal creativity, we have to become an expert in how our individual brain functions. Mindfulness is one way to become your very own brain expert.

      Mindfulness also has added benefits like calming us, slowing our breathing, and helping us become more observant, which are also great ways to start tapping into our creative potential.

      Final Thoughts

      So, it may not be correct to say that our right brain is our creative brain, but it is still a valid pursuit to try to optimize our creative brain centers.

      The key to do so is to relax, become observant, shift your perspective, move your body, try something new, and, whatever you do, don’t force it.

      Creativity can feel slippery. It can abandon us when we need it most, but by slowing down and looking at things from a new perspective, we can give ourselves a better chance of tapping into our ultimate creativity, even if that doesn’t exactly mean our “right brain.”

      More Tips on Boosting Creativity

      Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

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