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5 Misconceptions About Weight Loss, For Those Looking to Lose it Fast

5 Misconceptions About Weight Loss, For Those Looking to Lose it Fast

It’s the issue that’s weighing heavily on our national conscious – Australia is putting on weight at an alarming rate. In fact research from the 2011–12 Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Health Survey found that two thirds of Australians are classified as overweight or obese. So it’s time to stop sugar coating, we have a problem that requires a solution. The only issue is when it comes to finding the truth in the great weight debate, sometimes there’s too much noise and not enough information.

If you’re on a mission to shed the kilos but aren’t looking to fall victim to false theories, then read on for the five biggest misconceptions about weight loss. And you may even discover some top tips to get you healthy in a hurry!

Here are five misconceptions about weight loss, for those looking to lose it fast.

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Misconception #1: The quick fix exists

Anyone who has battled the bulge is no stranger to the quick fix. We’re talking juice cleanses, miracle shakes, lemon juice detox. But do they work? Not at all, according to weight loss experts.

“These diets may make you feel lighter in the short term but it’s simply due to fluid loss,” says Pip Reed, founder of The Health Clinic.

The reality is there is no such thing as a quick fix. One increasingly common method of weight loss is surgery, but even keyhole – a popular procedure in Australia – isn’t a shortcut.

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“People think weight loss surgery is a quick fix but it requires commitment,” explains Dr James Chau, a bariatric surgeon at the Weightloss and Keyhole surgery centre. “You need to stick to an exercise and nutrition plan, weight loss doesn’t just stop after the surgery!”

Misconception #2: I go to the gym, therefore I should be thin

Exercise is often seen as the crucial element in reaching and maintaining a healthy body weight. However, with so many external factors that contribute to weight loss, if you’re failing to see results, exercise could be having the opposite effect.

“You may be putting on weight as you increase exercise intensity in a bid to lose the weight,” Pip says. “This can cause more damage, inflammation and weight gain.”

Misconception #3: The weight is gone and so too are my worries!

Once you’ve dropped the necessary kilos it’s tempting to think that the hard work is over, unfortunately, keeping weight off is harder than losing it!

“Keeping weight off is definitely harder,” says naturopath Lisa Guy. “The only true way to keep it off is if you make healthy dietary and lifestyle changes for life, not just for 2 weeks.”

Seems that most experts agree maintenance is the key.

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“Even with surgery, the maintenance is crucial,” explains Dr Chau. “The period following any substantial weight loss is when the true test begins; you have to form healthy habits.”

Misconception #4: I’m overweight, therefore unhealthy

Being overweight doesn’t necessarily equate to being unhealthy, which can be frustrating for those piling on the pounds.

“Excess weight can be a sign of a hidden factor and it’s addressing that factor that can best assist weight loss goals,” nutritionist, Chef and Author Zoe Bingley Pullin explains.

Misconception #5: Tasty foods are off the menu

Most people tend to associate weight loss with bland, tasteless meals but the two are not mutually exclusive:

“Tasty foods are off the menu – healthy does not mean tasteless and everything in moderation can be enjoyed as part of a weight loss plan,” says Zoe. And just because you’re looking to lose weight it doesn’t mean you can’t eat out with friends: “it’s possible to adapt meals by reducing portion of meat or carbs in replace of extra vegetables”.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

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