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9 Hacks That Will Help You Land a Job as a Web Developer [Infographic]

9 Hacks That Will Help You Land a Job as a Web Developer [Infographic]

Job hunting is a roller coaster ride. It can be exciting, inspiring, and frightening all at the same time. As an aspiring web developer, you need to keep up with the latest trends in order to have an updated and employable resume.

Zeolearn has created an infographic that will help you get a clearer view of the industry in 2017:

    The good news is, there’s a high employment rate in the web development job market right now. Statistics show that it’s set to grow 27% from 2014 to 2024 – much faster than the average profession.[1]

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    But if you want to snag the most rewarding positions from the best companies, you need to show that you’re better than the rest of the pack. Below are nine hacks that can help you do this:

    1. Help Out with an Open Source Project

    Becoming a web developer means dedicating yourself to a lifetime of learning. Contributing to open source projects will not only sharpen your skills, but it will also let you experience working with other developers.

    One of the best places to look for open source projects would be Explore GitHub. Here, you can find a range of options – from personal projects to large-scale projects by established companies. Whatever you choose, it’s always good to show potential employers that you’ve been out there and actually accomplished something productive with your skills.

    2. Participate in GitHub

    In addition to looking for open source projects, you can also use GitHub to post your own codes and receive the input of the online development community. This is a simple way to show off your capabilities as a developer. But more importantly, it is a great way to leverage the knowledge of the online community to improve your skills.

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    3. Build a Professional LinkedIn Account

    In today’s world, having a LinkedIn account is like a rite of passage for future professionals. However, having a poorly-optimized LinkedIn profile could be hurting your credibility.[2]

    First of all, be sure to check your profile for any grammatical and spelling errors. Also, make sure you stay up-to-date with LinkedIn’s latest features, include your featured skills, and share your most recent accomplishments.

    4. Setup an Online Web Design Portfolio

    What better way to demonstrate your web development skills than to showcase your own online web development portfolio? To get started, you can use a CMS (Content Management System), like WordPress, to build your portfolio site within a few hours. Here are some examples from Creative Bloq for inspiration.

    5. Do Freelance Work

    Doing freelance work is a great way to fill your online portfolio while earning money on the side. It will also help you learn new skills along the way.

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    To look for freelance work, you can refer to marketplaces like Upwork and Freelancer. These sites list job opportunities based on the required skills, estimated budget, and date posted. The only downside is that you’ll have to compete with other freelancers by bidding for your chosen project.

    6. Attend Real Life Meet-Ups

    To gain a foothold as a web developer, you need to expand your network and get acquainted with other people in the industry. You can use a service like Meetup.com to browse between thousands of meet-ups across the world. Who knows, maybe you’ll meet a future co-worker or employer at one of these events.

    7. Identify the In-Demand Skills

    The in-demand skills in the tech industry change over time, and it’s your job to have a relevant skill set if you ever want to be employed. A good strategy is to refer to online job listings and read what companies are looking for. Other than freelancing marketplaces like Upwork, you can also refer to job search platforms like Indeed and online listings on Craigslist.

    8. Seek Online Certification

    In relation to the previous hack, you can sign up for online certification programs to improve your employability and diversify your skill set. You can easily search Google for online certification programs that can help with specific skills such as PHP 7, autocomplete systems, virtual cloud servers, and AngularJS 2.0. For better learning, consider signing up for live mentorship platforms, like Zeolearn, so you’ll be job-ready by the end of the course.

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    9. Tune In to the Industry News

    While being proficient in relevant skills is important, you should also follow industry news to have more meaningful conversations with peers and interviewers. Resources like Lifehacker have its own section for web design and development articles, so start there.

    Final Words

    Finally, if you think you’re ready for your first job interview, then you probably are. The next steps include scouring online job listings, learning a bit more about specific roles, and surprising interviewers by showing them how much you know. You can refer to this post for a list of resources that can help you look for your first job online.

    ____

    Image Credits:

    Infographic Source: Courtesy of Zeolearn

    Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com via pixabay.com

    Reference

    [1] Bureau of Labor Statistics: Web Developers
    [2] Forbes: Ten Ways Your LinkedIn Profile Is Hurting Your Credibility

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    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

    Joe’s Goals

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      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

      Daytum

        Daytum

        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

        Excel or Numbers

          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

          Evernote

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            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

            Access or Bento

              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

              Conclusion

              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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