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9 Hacks That Will Help You Land a Job as a Web Developer [Infographic]

9 Hacks That Will Help You Land a Job as a Web Developer [Infographic]

Job hunting is a roller coaster ride. It can be exciting, inspiring, and frightening all at the same time. As an aspiring web developer, you need to keep up with the latest trends in order to have an updated and employable resume.

Zeolearn has created an infographic that will help you get a clearer view of the industry in 2017:

    The good news is, there’s a high employment rate in the web development job market right now. Statistics show that it’s set to grow 27% from 2014 to 2024 – much faster than the average profession.[1]

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    But if you want to snag the most rewarding positions from the best companies, you need to show that you’re better than the rest of the pack. Below are nine hacks that can help you do this:

    1. Help Out with an Open Source Project

    Becoming a web developer means dedicating yourself to a lifetime of learning. Contributing to open source projects will not only sharpen your skills, but it will also let you experience working with other developers.

    One of the best places to look for open source projects would be Explore GitHub. Here, you can find a range of options – from personal projects to large-scale projects by established companies. Whatever you choose, it’s always good to show potential employers that you’ve been out there and actually accomplished something productive with your skills.

    2. Participate in GitHub

    In addition to looking for open source projects, you can also use GitHub to post your own codes and receive the input of the online development community. This is a simple way to show off your capabilities as a developer. But more importantly, it is a great way to leverage the knowledge of the online community to improve your skills.

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    3. Build a Professional LinkedIn Account

    In today’s world, having a LinkedIn account is like a rite of passage for future professionals. However, having a poorly-optimized LinkedIn profile could be hurting your credibility.[2]

    First of all, be sure to check your profile for any grammatical and spelling errors. Also, make sure you stay up-to-date with LinkedIn’s latest features, include your featured skills, and share your most recent accomplishments.

    4. Setup an Online Web Design Portfolio

    What better way to demonstrate your web development skills than to showcase your own online web development portfolio? To get started, you can use a CMS (Content Management System), like WordPress, to build your portfolio site within a few hours. Here are some examples from Creative Bloq for inspiration.

    5. Do Freelance Work

    Doing freelance work is a great way to fill your online portfolio while earning money on the side. It will also help you learn new skills along the way.

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    To look for freelance work, you can refer to marketplaces like Upwork and Freelancer. These sites list job opportunities based on the required skills, estimated budget, and date posted. The only downside is that you’ll have to compete with other freelancers by bidding for your chosen project.

    6. Attend Real Life Meet-Ups

    To gain a foothold as a web developer, you need to expand your network and get acquainted with other people in the industry. You can use a service like Meetup.com to browse between thousands of meet-ups across the world. Who knows, maybe you’ll meet a future co-worker or employer at one of these events.

    7. Identify the In-Demand Skills

    The in-demand skills in the tech industry change over time, and it’s your job to have a relevant skill set if you ever want to be employed. A good strategy is to refer to online job listings and read what companies are looking for. Other than freelancing marketplaces like Upwork, you can also refer to job search platforms like Indeed and online listings on Craigslist.

    8. Seek Online Certification

    In relation to the previous hack, you can sign up for online certification programs to improve your employability and diversify your skill set. You can easily search Google for online certification programs that can help with specific skills such as PHP 7, autocomplete systems, virtual cloud servers, and AngularJS 2.0. For better learning, consider signing up for live mentorship platforms, like Zeolearn, so you’ll be job-ready by the end of the course.

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    9. Tune In to the Industry News

    While being proficient in relevant skills is important, you should also follow industry news to have more meaningful conversations with peers and interviewers. Resources like Lifehacker have its own section for web design and development articles, so start there.

    Final Words

    Finally, if you think you’re ready for your first job interview, then you probably are. The next steps include scouring online job listings, learning a bit more about specific roles, and surprising interviewers by showing them how much you know. You can refer to this post for a list of resources that can help you look for your first job online.

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    Image Credits:

    Infographic Source: Courtesy of Zeolearn

    Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com via pixabay.com

    Reference

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    Last Updated on August 29, 2018

    5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

    5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

    Journaling is one of the most useful personal development tools around. Not only does it help us process emotions and experiences, work through internal conflicts and improve our self-awareness, it also provides us with a way to keep a day-to-day record of our lives. Traditionally an activity limited to pen and paper, the expansion of consumer technology has enabled journaling to go digital.

    Saving your journaling entries online enables you to access them from anywhere, without having to carry a notebook and pen around, and provides you with digital features, like tagging and search functions.

    Here are a list of five online journaling tools you can use to bring your practice into the modern age:

    1. 750words

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    750 words

      750words is a free online journaling tool created by Buster Benson. The site is based on the idea of “Morning Pages”; a journaling tool Julia Cameron suggests in her creativity course The Artist’s Way. Cameron advises aspiring creatives to start each morning with three pages of stream-of-consciousness writing to clear away the mental clutter, leaving you with a clearer mind to face the day.

      750 words is the three-page digital equivalent (assuming the average person writes 250 words per page) and lets you store all your journaling online. Each morning, you’ll receive a prompt asking you to write your 750 words, and the site keeps track of various statistics associated with your entries. The site uses a Regressive Imagery Dictionary to calculate the emotional content from your posts and provides feedback on features like your mood, and most commonly used words.

      750 words is simple to set up and is ideal for anyone who finds it challenging to maintain a consistent journaling practice. The site uses a number of incentives to motivate users, including animal badges awarded to journalers who complete a certain number of days in a row, leader boards, and opt-in monthly challenges.

      2. Ohlife

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      ohlife

        Ohlife is designed to make online journaling as easy as possible. Once you’ve signed up for your free account, the website will send you an email each day asking “How did your day go?” Simply reply to the email with as much or as little detail as you like, and your response will be stored on your account, ready to view next time you log in.

        Ohlife’s appeal lies in its simplicity: no stats, no social sharing, no complicated organisational systems—the site is designed to provide you with a private, online space. Simply respond to the email each day (or skip the days you’re busy) and Ohlife will do the rest.

        3. Oneword

        oneword

          OneWord is a fun online tool that provides you with a single word as a prompt and gives you sixty seconds to write about it. The concept’s aim is to help writers learn how to flow, and the prompts range from the everyday mundane to the profound.

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          Oneword is not a private journaling tool: if you sign up, your answers will be published on the site’s daily blog, which contains a stream of users’ answers, and might be used by Oneword in the future. If you’d rather keep your answers to yourself, you can still use the tool for fun without giving out any personal details.

          4. Penzu

            Penzu is a journaling tool that allows you to store your journaling notes online. The service also offers mobile apps for iOS, Android and Blackberry, so you can journal on the go and save your notes to your account. The basic service is free, however you can upgrade to Penzu Pro and get access to additional features, including military-grade encryption and the ability to save and sync data through your mobile, for $19 per year.

            With either version of Penzu, you can insert pictures, and add tags and comments to entries, as well as search for older entries. You can set your posts to be private and viewable by you only, or share them with others.

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            5. Evernote

            Evernote isn’t a purpose-built journaling tool, however its features make it perfect for keeping your journaling notes in one safe place. With the ability to keep separate “notebooks”, tag your entries, include pictures, audio and web clipping, Evernote will appeal to journalers who want to include more formats than just text in their entries.

            Available online within a web browser, and as a stand-alone desktop app, the service also comes with a series of mobile apps covering almost every device available. These allow you to make notes on the go and sync between the mobile and browser versions of the app.

            For additional features, including text recognition and the ability to collaborate on Notebooks, you can upgrade to Evernote’s premium service, which costs $5 per month.

            Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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