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Life-Saving Instagram Tools For Photographers

Life-Saving Instagram Tools For Photographers

Instagram is the perfect social networking site for photographers to show off their work and attract new clients. Simone Bramante, Dirk Bakker, Robin Ryan and Mike Cus are a few of the photographers that have used Instagram.

Instagram serves many purposes for professional photographers. They can use it to build their reputation and improve the quality of their pictures. It’s also a great way to connect with other photographers and admire each other’s work.

“Instagram has become home to over 300 million users in the four years it’s been around, and it seems ready to only get bigger,” states Robin Ryan, a professional photographer and author at Digital Photography School. “300 million is a big, big number. It can seem overwhelming, but it’s a great tool to not only create community, but also to become a better photographer.”[1]

It’s easy to see why photographers are using Instagram. A couple of weeks ago, the company stated that it had over 600 million active users.[2] The bad news is that photographers have a difficult time standing out – unless they use the right tools.

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Here are some great Instagram tools that every photographer should use.

1. Crowdfire

Deciding who to follow and unfollow should be a major part of your Instagram strategy. If you follow people that are interested in what you share, they may follow you back and share your content. However, if you follow people that don’t follow you back, you will run into a couple problems:

  • Your account can look spammy if you have a high following to follower ratio.
  • Your feed will be cluttered with a lot of content that isn’t relevant to your business (or worth sharing with your followers).

Crowdfire is a great tool for managing the accounts you follow. It can automatically unfollow accounts that:

  • Are dormant
  • Haven’t followed you back
  • Have been flagged for spam

Using Crowdfire to clean up the accounts you follow will help you attract more followers of your own.

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2. ScheduGram

As a professional photographer, you need to make sure your posts receive as much exposure as possible. You need to schedule your Instagram posts wisely to gain traction. If you only offer services to clients in your area, you need to make sure your posts are seen by people living near you.

ScheduGram allows you to schedule all of your Instagram posts in advance. If you find that the majority of your posts are seen while you are asleep or out taking new pictures, then you can still get the exposure you need.

3. Like4Like

The Instagram algorithm is built off social likes. The more likes your posts receive, the higher they will rank in the Instagram feed. It can be difficult to get likes when you don’t have a high follower count yet, so you should try using Like4Like.

This tool allows you to exchange Instagram likes with other users. This helps everyone rank higher in the feed.

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However, it’s important to be smart with the people you collaborate with. Make sure they are legitimate accounts (not made specifically for exchanging likes or creating spam). You also want to exchange likes with accounts that have a similar audience. Again, if you are a local photographer, you should try to exchange likes with Instagram users in your area, since their followers are more likely to become future clients. Ideal Instagram users would be local news sites, local web developers or nonprofits.

4. Soldsie

Photographers are a dime a dozen in many communities, particularly urban regions like New York City and California. Creating custom biographies is a great way to make yourself stand out. Soldsie is a great tool that lets you create custom biographies with links to your website.

Here is an example of a hypothetical biography a photographer could use:

“Mike Nelong is an esoteric and landscape photographer from San Francisco. You can visit his website to see more samples of his work.”

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You want to make sure your biography is compelling and has a unique call-to-action.

5. Iconosquare

Too many photographers post on Instagram without knowing whether their content is actually engaging their followers. If you aren’t sure whether your posts are working you should create an account with Iconosquare.

Iconosquare is like a Google Analytics account for Instagram. Instead of measuring traffic, it monitors likes, comments and other engagement metrics.

Not only does this tool help you optimize your Instagram marketing strategy, it also helps you know what types of photographs people are most interested in. This is important because the photographs that you like best may not be the ones your clients are looking for. Your Iconosquare data will help you improve customer satisfaction by taking better photographs.

Conclusion

Instagram is a great platform for budding photographers. However, it’s also becoming very crowded since so many photographers are using it to reach clients. You need to take advantage of valuable Instagram tools to get more exposure for your services.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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