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9 Cool Apps That Are Draining Your Phone Battery

9 Cool Apps That Are Draining Your Phone Battery

Smartphones are hardly ever used as phones anymore. They are now mini computers which we carry about everywhere and do everything with. The number of tasks we can perform with our phones keeps increasing every day. We text, play games, surf the Internet, stalk our crushes, shoot videos on the devices, and stay on several social media sites all day. These are all cool things which I am sure most of us cannot last through a single day without doing. However, we need to have enough battery power to perform these fun tasks.

Running out of battery power while doing something important can be very frustrating, so we put together a list of apps that are draining your phone’s battery power. Check them out so that you can be mindful and manage your phone battery power accordingly.

1. Facebook

This is an addiction for millions of people. The degree of addiction to Facebook might vary, but it is easy to recognize. Many people are constantly glancing at or glued to Facebook on their phones throughout the day. Social media is cool for keeping up with friends, keeping in touch, meeting new people, and even getting those annoying game requests, but using your Facebook app all the time is a great way to bring your battery life down to 10 percent before noon. You should make a schedule and login only at the appointed times to check on updates. That way, you won’t stay on Facebook all day. This will help reduce your addiction and save your phone battery.

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2. Games

Yes, we are all guilty of this! I bet you have all had times when you’ve been in the waiting room somewhere or just out of things to do, and you whipped out your phone and headed straight to Clash of Clans, Subway Surf or Candy Crush to pass the time. Although moving up the scoreboard and beating your online friends might be fun and fulfilling at the time, these gaming apps with their cool graphics and online connectivity exert heavy use on your battery. If you intend to save your phone’s battery power and general battery life, then you should get a gaming laptop and use that instead. This would drastically minimize your gaming activity on your phone.

3. Screen brightness

I am pretty sure that most of you have figured this out already. Though a bright screen makes it easier to see what you are doing and easier to watch movies, you should be aware that keeping your screen’s brightness all the way up is killing your battery. When it’s not absolutely necessary to keep the screen brightness at the max, decrease brightness!

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    4. Enabling Bluetooth

    There are some Bluetooth accessories and gadgets, like portable speakers or wireless headsets, which we connect to our phones for convenience and to enhance our productivity. After use, you should always remember to disable your Bluetooth. It’s not exactly the worst battery drainer, but it’s a waste to have your Bluetooth enabled when you are not using it.

    5. Virtual Private Network (VPN)

    This is all the rage today. I know this because I have a Virtual Private Network (VPN) on my gadgets, and most of my friends do too. For privacy or for other reasons, most of us make use of VPNs on our computers, and for some reason, we use them on our phones too. Just like most apps, a VPN stays connected in the background and drains your phone’s battery. I know VPNs are indispensable to some of us, so you are probably asking right about now: what’s the solution? I have a simple solution so you can save your battery. Only turn it on when you need to use it, and just like with Bluetooth, turn it off when you are done.

    6. Location services

    If we didn’t enable GPS or location-based services on our phones, some of us would be lost. It is routine for many people to use these tools to locate places like hotels, concert venues, restaurants, and lots more. This makes GPS and Google Maps some of our favorite phone apps. However, if you have your GPS and other location-based apps enabled all the time, they might drain your battery until you don’t have enough battery power left to get to your destination. Thankfully, Google Maps allows map download for offline use, which helps conserve battery and data.

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    7. Spotify

    Music is the food of the soul, and we all love to feed our souls and light up our days with music. This is why we enjoy Pandora, Spotify, and other music services. Unfortunately, Spotify happens to be one of the biggest battery killers. Those long hours of lovely listening are great and all, but your battery power won’t last three hours if you continue with the habit.

    8. Snapchat

    We know what’s going on when you hold up your phone at a great party to capture all the booze and fun going down before typing about how awesome your Friday night is. Chances are that you’re on Snapchat and you’re trying to make us normal boring mortals jealous of your cool life by sharing some great stories. Well, you should tone it down a little or you are going to have a dead battery soon. This is because the camera and location-based service you enable while you use Snapchat take up lots of battery power.

    9. Netflix

    Binge watching entire seasons of “Orange is the New Black” or “House Of Cards” on Netflix over Wi-Fi is all fun and interesting until you get the low battery notification. Netflix is a handy video-streaming service you can enjoy anywhere. It offers lots of interesting movies, but none about how to replenish battery power in emergencies. Thanks to the data usage and HD playback, this service sucks battery power like a child with a juice box. Please, for your own sake, you should use Netflix on a TV or laptop, not on your phone.

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    Featured photo credit: Lulu Chang via digitaltrends.com

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    Elise Bauer

    Freelance Writer, Lawyer & Blogger

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    Last Updated on February 15, 2019

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

    Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

    Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

    Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

    So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

    Joe’s Goals

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      Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

      Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

      Daytum

        Daytum

        is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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        Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

        Excel or Numbers

          If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

          What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

          Evernote

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            I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

            Evernote is free with a premium version available.

            Access or Bento

              If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

              Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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              You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

              Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

              All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

              Conclusion

              I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

              What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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