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10 WhatsApp Tricks You Never Knew About

10 WhatsApp Tricks You Never Knew About

WhatsApp, over the years, has grown to be by far the world’s leading mobile messaging app. Today, it boasts well over 1 billion users with new, distinct, and innovative features popping up almost every six months. I think it’s safe to say that no one will be knocking WhatsApp off its throne anytime soon. Even with the fact that most low end Windows Phones and BlackBerries no longer support WhatsApp (you know, because WhatsApp is so good, its developers can afford to be proud and picky), the user base doesn’t seem to be affected one bit, giving the app further credibility and overall appeal.

WhatsApp has numerous uses; the ubiquitous messaging, voice calls, and the recently added video calls. However, there are some hidden things that the app is capable of performing; uses that aren’t known to just everyone. Most times, upon getting to know these WhatsApp tricks, people marvel (as if they just discovered fire or something), while other times, the hidden uses seem useless. Nevertheless, here are 10 tricks you can perform on WhatsApp that not everyone knows about.

1. Read messages without the sender knowing

There’s a usual paradigm in messaging that you have to reply to a message once you see it. Ever been in a situation where you want to read a message without having to reply, or without making the sender realize you saw it? Apparently, now you can, if you follow these simple steps:

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  • Go to your phone network settings and disable your mobile data (or simply turn on flight mode)
  • Go back to the message and read it
  • Return to your settings and switch your mobile data back on (or in the case of flight mode, switch it off again)

When you do this, blue ticks (which indicate that you’ve read the message) won’t appear, due to lack of internet connection.

2. Operate without a SIM card

This trick is only available for those using tablets to run their WhatsApp account. You can actually run your WhatsApp account seamlessly without using a SIM card. However, you’ll need a nearby functional SIM. Simply install WhatsApp on the tablet, and during the verification process, save the number of the SIM. A message containing your verification code will be sent to that SIM, and you can simply enter the code in where appropriate. Your account is verified and you’re ready to go.

3. Create contact shortcuts

For contacts that you chat with frequently – family, friends, business associates, etc. – you could save yourself the stress of having to sift through your apps, opening WhatsApp, and sifting through chats to get to them. All you have to do is to create a shortcut for their chats on your phone’s homepage. Start by pressing on the contact and holding until a pop-up filled with options appears. Included in that pop-up is the ‘create chat shortcut’ option. Choose that option, and on your home screen, a shortcut for that chat will appear.

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4. Extend validity

WhatsApp requires regular updates. If you don’t update your app by yourself, they’ll force you to do so by temporarily cutting you off. Most times, updates contain just little tweaks, and you spend a considerable amount of data and space for almost nothing. The process of extending your WhatsApp validity is quite complex, so follow closely:

  • Head into your WhatsApp settings. Go to Account, then click on Change Number
  • Enter your number as the old number. If you have a second SIM, put it as your new number
  • Do this again, swapping the two numbers as old and new. This means your original number returns to its position
  • Bam! Your WhatsApp account’s validity is extended for a whole year.

5. Hide last seen

Your ‘last seen’ feature shows people the last time you were on WhatsApp. If you’re looking to hide that, maybe from stalkers or other weird people, just go to Settings, then Account, and then Privacy. From here, you can change whatever settings you want to change relating to your privacy – your last seen, profile picture, status, etc.

6. Voice control

Voice control means you don’t have to type a single thing. There’s a microphone-shaped icon on your WhatsApp keyboard panel. Speaking clearly and directly into the speakers after pressing this icon will activate voice control, and your words will be typed as said. If you’re on the go and you don’t have the time to type, this feature can be very nifty.

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7. Directly reply to messages

Most times, you might wish to reply to people as chats go on, especially in group chats where people speak in droves, and someone else might have taken your turn before you even had the chance to finish typing. If you’re looking to reply to someone, all you have to do is to press their message for about two seconds. An option board will pop up, including the option to reply. Click this, and their message will move on top of the space where your words will appear as they are typed. After you reply, simply post your message and it will be duly shown.

8. Successfully change phone numbers

Changing SIMs often means that you have to start a new WhatsApp experience. However, there’s a way you can continue using your old account with an entirely new SIM card. To migrate, head to Settings, then Account, and finally, Change Number. Once you enter the old and new numbers in their respective spaces, your account will be moved successfully.

9. Send edited texts

Apart from normal texts and fonts, you can make special edits to them. Pay attention:

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  • To make a text bold, add an asterisk (*) before and after the text (e.g. *asterisk*)
  • To put a text in italic form, add an underscore (_) before and after the text (e.g.  _underscore_)
  • To strike a text out, add a hyphen (-) before and after the text (e.g  -hyphen-)

10. Camera gimmicks

The new version of WhatsApp comes with two special camera effects. When taking a picture with the WhatsApp camera, you can interchange the front and back cameras by double tapping the screen. You can also zoom in and out of your videos by sliding two fingers up (for zooming in) and down (for zooming out).

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Tanvir Zafar

The founder of ISU Technologies, passionate in writing about productivity, creativity, entrepreneurship, work and technology.

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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