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5 Free Online Gaming Websites for Casual Gamers

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5 Free Online Gaming Websites for Casual Gamers

The world of online gaming has evolved quickly over the past few years. The old Pentium PCs with less than 1 GB of RAM have been replaced with serious gaming rigs rocking octa-core processors and over 16 GB of RAM. Video game consoles haven’t been left behind, with the latest console from Sony, the PS4 Pro, promising 4K support and unreal graphics.

But even with all the 3D or VR graphics in the world, nothing can beat a good old game of Donkey Kong or Super Mario Bros. Most titles in the 2D realm still offer a nice break from advanced gaming. They can also be good distractions for those looking to take a breather from heavy workloads without powering up a console or PC for a long game of Call of Duty.

The world of online gaming is filled with tons of simple game titles that can be played with the most basic computers and usually for free. Check out some of these online gaming sites for casual gamers:

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1. Miniclip

Miniclip is one of the oldest gaming sites on the internet, having been in business for the last fifteen years. During that time, developers have been constantly adding new game titles to the site, creating one of the largest databases of free online games. Miniclip gives you access to a wide spectrum of games, including action and racing games, puzzles, and arcade games.

The multiplayer experience at Miniclip is also quite interesting, with a whole set of rewards, challenges, and games lined up for players. Plus you can play from virtually any mobile device, thanks to multiplatform support for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone.

2. King

King is the development company behind the critically acclaimed game Candy Crush Saga, which raked in an estimated $493 million in 2014. King is also behind other successful game titles, including Candy Crush Soda Saga and Candy Crush Jelly Saga.

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In addition to the typical mobile gameplay on iOS, Windows Phone, and Android devices, some of King’s games can also be played freely on desktops. These include Pet Rescue Saga, Candy Crush Soda Saga, Candy Crush Saga, and Farm Heroes Saga. Additionally, you can sync your progress across all your devices, which makes King’s online gaming services a worthwhile experience for the casual gamer.

3. Pogo

Pogo is a simple online gaming site with tons of free games for casual gamers. It has the distinct tone and feel of Miniclip but sets itself apart by adding bingo, casino, and slot games to its offerings. Other notable genres include strategy, family, brain and puzzle games, arcade, sports, and the classics, which can make for a fun breakroom activity.

Pogo’s multiplayer platform allows players to enter into tournaments, win different types of rewards, make friends, and chat within an in-game widget. This adds a social element to users’ online gaming experiences that some casual gamers just might appreciate.

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4. Google Easter Egg Games

Google Easter eggs are a fun (and very distracting) list of activities that can be launched from Google’s search page. Among these are Easter egg games that include solitaire and tic-tac-toe. Casual gamers looking for more fun can play a game of Atari Breakout by simply carrying out an image search for “Atari breakout.”

5. Study Hall Games

Study hall games are a set of arcade games that are often characterized by simple graphics and short play times. These games are usually perfect for gamers looking to take a break between tasks such as working on homework or school assignments. The short levels/stages within the games mean that players don’t get hooked to the game and can usually get back to the task at hand within minutes (unlike, say, a game of Grand Theft Auto V).

There are tons of study hall games freely available on the internet. Tech Review Pro does a good piece on some of the best study hall games and the websites that offer them, so be sure to check them out.

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Online gaming will continue to thrive, even in the face of realistic graphics from consoles and PCs and the virtual reality world. The gameplay offered by these titles is simple, short, and fun, which makes them perfect for the casual gamer.

Featured photo credit: Marco Bonomo via stocksnap.io

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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