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4 Smart Ways to Create an Awesome Playlist

4 Smart Ways to Create an Awesome Playlist

The Internet has opened new doors for music lovers around the world. Did you know there are over 100 million songs online?

There are plenty of ways to listen to Taylor Swift’s newest single or listen to all of the Beatle’s classic hits. You can add them to your Spotify, iTunes or other MP3 players.

Downloading songs has never been easier. Here are some ways to create the perfect playlist.

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1. Create a Smart Playlist With iTunes or Pandora

The nice thing about iTunes is that it has a lot of great filters. You can use them to create a Smart Playlist.

What types of Smart Playlists can you create? Here are some examples:

  • Album tracks instead of single hits
  • Holiday or seasonal songs
  • Songs that nobody has listened to in a while (filter by “last played”)
  • Most popular songs of the year

There are millions of songs on iTunes. You should have no trouble using their filters to create multiple Smart playlists.

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Pandora recently announced that they will be allowing their users to create smart playlists as well.

“If you think about the solutions that have been offered to date, they’ve essentially been on demand,” CEO, Tim Westergren said during the announcement. “We really don’t believe that’s the right answer — you see all the symptoms of a product that’s not meeting peoples’ needs yet.”[1]

2. Borrow Other Playlists on Instant FM or Blip FM

Instant FM and Blip FM are both popular tools for sharing playlists. If you spent a day putting together a spectacular playlist, then you can share it with people that have similar music tastes.

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On the flipside, you can also look at playlists other people have created. If someone seems to like the same type of music, then you should see what they put together. You can easily copy it, so you don’t need to spend time building your own playlist from scratch.

Of course, you can also remove any songs that you don’t want to listen to. If someone’s musical tastes are almost identical to yours, except for a strange addiction to Katy Perry singles, then you can filter by artist and remove them with the click of a mouse.

3. Get Songs from YouTube

Almost every song ever made is on YouTube. Many people go to YouTube to listen to music when they don’t have access to an iPod or MP3 Player. They also like to listen to amateur songs people upload. They may follow several YouTube stars and download their own songs (or impersonations of other artists).

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If you come across a great song on YouTube, you can also add it to your own playlist. There are some great tools that let you convert a YouTube video to MP3 files.

4. Use Spotify Search Operators

Spotify doesn’t have the same filtering system that Pandora and iTunes offers, but it allows people to use custom search operators to customize their searches in unique ways. Here are a couple of custom searches you can conduct:

  • “year:2000-2010″ If you don’t want to listen to anything from the last century, this search operator will give you what you want. It will spit out songs that were made in 2000 or later.
  • “genre:hip hop year 2016” If you want to look at all of last year’s best hip hop songs, this search operator does the trick.
  • “artist:Taylor Swift” This will obviously show you all tracks from Taylor Swift.
  • “track:love” This will give you all tracks with the word “love” in them.
  • “album:Loveless” This will list the album “Loveless.” It is perfect if you know exactly what you are looking for and don’t want a bunch of unrelated albums showing up in your search.

These search operators aren’t case sensitive.

Conclusion

Do you love listening to music from Spotify, iTunes or Pandora? There are lots of great ways to create the perfect playlist. Make sure you understand the filtering options so you can find the songs you want.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

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Ryan Kh

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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Review Your Past Flow

Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

    Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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