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How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

Long term addiction can cause you serious problems; more than just the obvious health issues, an inability to work may leave you in a difficult financial position, and you may not have health insurance or any funding to allow you to pay for the rehabilitation program you need to recover.

However, there are solutions, and not having health insurance does not mean that you will not get into rehab. There are a number of possible options to finance a rehab program.

Why is rehab important?

You may feel that you don’t need rehab, and that you can quit drugs at any time without assistance; sadly, this is all too often the case. The way that drugs change your body through addiction will often take away you control, leaving you unable to quit without assistance.

Effectively recovering from drug or alcohol abuse will require professional support, not just for the physical effects of the addiction, but also the psychological issues.

You may feel that you have the strength to give up drugs alone by going ‘cold turkey’ and just stopping taking drugs; however, scientific research has shown this may make your addictions worse. In experiments it was found the addictive drive was stronger after a period of abstinence alone.[1]

What does rehab cost?

There is no one set price for treatment, and the costs vary greatly according to the type of treatment and the provider. However, the following will give you an idea of what the costs could be if you were not covered by insurance.[2]

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Type of Treatment Cost
Residential Treatment: Staying onsite at a specialized facility. Treatment may include one-on-one psychotherapy, group therapy, 12-step meetings, medication therapy, and other holistic approaches like yoga and mindfulness. $0 – $80,000 per month
Outpatient Treatment: Outpatient centers offer the same types of treatment as residential programs; however, as you don’t stay overnight, you can more easily continue to work or attend school while still fulfilling your treatment plan. c. $2,000 per month
Sober Living Homes: Previously known as Halfway-houses. These are live-in, drug-free living environments that offer peer support for recovery and long-term sobriety. $450 – $10,000 per month
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A common psychotherapeutic treatment for a variety of mental illnesses, including anxiety and mood disorders, as well as addiction. CBT focuses on questioning and changing negative and unproductive thoughts and beliefs in order to stop the triggers, behavior, and underlying emotions that contribute to mental illness and addiction. $100 per hour

c. $400 – $800 per month

Family And Couples Therapy: Sometimes called multidimensional family therapy, or MDFT, it is structured so that every member of the family has a voice. With the guidance of a professional therapist, the goal is to improve the interworking of each family’s relationships and their home life. $75 – 200 per hour

c. $300 – $1,600 per month

Drug Therapy: Medication can be used to help ease symptoms of withdrawal, and to prevent cravings that can lead to relapse. $21 – $1,000 per month

Possible options for funding rehab

There are a number of options to allow you to get the funding you need for treatment. One single option may not offer what you need, and you may need to combine more than one route to funding:

  • Loans or finance
  • State-funded treatment
  • Borrow or raise money
  • Grants
  • Medicaid
  • Scholarships

Loans or Finance

You should not give up hope if you are experiencing financial difficulties, or have no insurance. Many rehab providers understand the situation faced by people who have been suffering with addiction, and there are ways in which you can be supported.

Many providers may offer you a loan or finance offer, which will allow you to undergo the rehab you require, safe in the knowledge that you will have an affordable payment plan in the future. Generally, you will not start having to pay until you have completed your rehab.

Some credit card companies will offer deferred interest rate healthcare credit cards specifically for medical related expenses, including substance and mental health treatment. However, most providers will require you to have a good credit score; on average you would need a credit score of at least 640. If you do not have this you may do better to look at other options.

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State-Funded Treatment

Another available option is to use a state-funded treatment center. They are organizations that are funded by the state to support people who require rehab, but who do not have adequate insurance to cover commercial centers.

Funding for state-funded centers is limited, so there is likely to be a waiting list for a treatment program. The waiting time can vary from a month to over a year and a half depending on the state you are in.

However, if you can wait, this is an option for accessing healthcare professionals who can help you to recover.

Borrow or Raise Money

Can you borrow the funds you need from family, or perhaps raise money by selling items you have? You may be reluctant to ask your family for money; however, they may well be willing to help you if you are looking to work on a path towards recovery. Your family could pay all or part of your treatment costs as a gift, or a loan. If you have any savings, you could use these to pay for treatment; again, you may be reluctant, but you are taking a step which will improve your life, and if you recover you will not be spending money on alcohol or drugs.

The other option is to see if you have anything of value you could sell to go towards the cost of treatment. Getting yourself to a better place is a vital thing to do, and you should look for any sacrifices you can make to improve yourself and your life.

Grants

A potential option is to contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which provides grants to help fund your treatment if you cannot pay for your treatment because you have inadequate insurance coverage.

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There are details of the process you need to follow to obtain grants on the SAMHSA website.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program administered by your state. It provides payment for medical services for people who have low income, or who are unemployed. To qualify, you need to meet the income levels set by the government.

There are a number of rehab centers that will accept Medicaid patients. The funding is paid directly to your provider, and you may be asked pay a small part of the cost of treatment. This co-payment requirement is dependent on state rules.

There are numerous requirements that must be met to be eligible for funding; these may include your age, whether you are pregnant, disabled or blind; your income and any savings you may have or items you could sell to fund treatment is also considered. You are required to be a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant.

If you have a low income and are in one of the eligibility groups, you should apply for Medicaid.

Scholarships

There are some organizations that offer scholarships for people with low incomes. You should contact your chosen rehab provider to see if you are eligible for a scholarship. A number of providers can offer scholarships, and it is worth contacting your providers to see if they can support you, and if you meet their scholarship requirements.

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Low-cost or Free Options

There are also some low-cost, or even free options available to you via a range of organizations, including Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous. These offer self-help support groups where there is peer support, often following the 12-Step program.

12 Step Program

A twelve-step program is used to support recovery from addiction or compulsion. It was initially created by Alcoholics Anonymous in their 1939 book, Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The twelve step program has now been adopted by a number of organizations based on the original 12 steps:[3]

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human beings the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Individuals are often supported through the steps by a sponsor, a more experienced person who has gone through the process and can provide peer support.

The 12 step program is a well respected process, however only about 3% of people suffering from alcoholism and attending Alcoholics Anonymous involved in a study found recovery results without relapse from the 12-step programs treatment.[4] However, they can be used alongside or following other treatment to provide a peer network and ongoing support which may prevent future relapse for individuals.

Reference

[1] Professor Moshe Szyf: McGill University and Bar Ilan University
[2] Cost of Treatment: https://www.addiction.com/get-help/loved-one/paying-treatment-for-loved-one/
[3] Bill W. (June 2001). “Chapter 5: How It Works”
[4] Robert B. Cutler “Are alcoholism treatments effective? The Project MATCH data” BMC Public Health

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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