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How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

Long term addiction can cause you serious problems; more than just the obvious health issues, an inability to work may leave you in a difficult financial position, and you may not have health insurance or any funding to allow you to pay for the rehabilitation program you need to recover.

However, there are solutions, and not having health insurance does not mean that you will not get into rehab. There are a number of possible options to finance a rehab program.

Why is rehab important?

You may feel that you don’t need rehab, and that you can quit drugs at any time without assistance; sadly, this is all too often the case. The way that drugs change your body through addiction will often take away you control, leaving you unable to quit without assistance.

Effectively recovering from drug or alcohol abuse will require professional support, not just for the physical effects of the addiction, but also the psychological issues.

You may feel that you have the strength to give up drugs alone by going ‘cold turkey’ and just stopping taking drugs; however, scientific research has shown this may make your addictions worse. In experiments it was found the addictive drive was stronger after a period of abstinence alone.[1]

What does rehab cost?

There is no one set price for treatment, and the costs vary greatly according to the type of treatment and the provider. However, the following will give you an idea of what the costs could be if you were not covered by insurance.[2]

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Type of TreatmentCost
Residential Treatment: Staying onsite at a specialized facility. Treatment may include one-on-one psychotherapy, group therapy, 12-step meetings, medication therapy, and other holistic approaches like yoga and mindfulness.$0 – $80,000 per month
Outpatient Treatment: Outpatient centers offer the same types of treatment as residential programs; however, as you don’t stay overnight, you can more easily continue to work or attend school while still fulfilling your treatment plan.c. $2,000 per month
Sober Living Homes: Previously known as Halfway-houses. These are live-in, drug-free living environments that offer peer support for recovery and long-term sobriety.$450 – $10,000 per month
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A common psychotherapeutic treatment for a variety of mental illnesses, including anxiety and mood disorders, as well as addiction. CBT focuses on questioning and changing negative and unproductive thoughts and beliefs in order to stop the triggers, behavior, and underlying emotions that contribute to mental illness and addiction.$100 per hour

c. $400 – $800 per month

Family And Couples Therapy: Sometimes called multidimensional family therapy, or MDFT, it is structured so that every member of the family has a voice. With the guidance of a professional therapist, the goal is to improve the interworking of each family’s relationships and their home life.$75 – 200 per hour

c. $300 – $1,600 per month

Drug Therapy: Medication can be used to help ease symptoms of withdrawal, and to prevent cravings that can lead to relapse.$21 – $1,000 per month

Possible options for funding rehab

There are a number of options to allow you to get the funding you need for treatment. One single option may not offer what you need, and you may need to combine more than one route to funding:

  • Loans or finance
  • State-funded treatment
  • Borrow or raise money
  • Grants
  • Medicaid
  • Scholarships

Loans or Finance

You should not give up hope if you are experiencing financial difficulties, or have no insurance. Many rehab providers understand the situation faced by people who have been suffering with addiction, and there are ways in which you can be supported.

Many providers may offer you a loan or finance offer, which will allow you to undergo the rehab you require, safe in the knowledge that you will have an affordable payment plan in the future. Generally, you will not start having to pay until you have completed your rehab.

Some credit card companies will offer deferred interest rate healthcare credit cards specifically for medical related expenses, including substance and mental health treatment. However, most providers will require you to have a good credit score; on average you would need a credit score of at least 640. If you do not have this you may do better to look at other options.

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State-Funded Treatment

Another available option is to use a state-funded treatment center. They are organizations that are funded by the state to support people who require rehab, but who do not have adequate insurance to cover commercial centers.

Funding for state-funded centers is limited, so there is likely to be a waiting list for a treatment program. The waiting time can vary from a month to over a year and a half depending on the state you are in.

However, if you can wait, this is an option for accessing healthcare professionals who can help you to recover.

Borrow or Raise Money

Can you borrow the funds you need from family, or perhaps raise money by selling items you have? You may be reluctant to ask your family for money; however, they may well be willing to help you if you are looking to work on a path towards recovery. Your family could pay all or part of your treatment costs as a gift, or a loan. If you have any savings, you could use these to pay for treatment; again, you may be reluctant, but you are taking a step which will improve your life, and if you recover you will not be spending money on alcohol or drugs.

The other option is to see if you have anything of value you could sell to go towards the cost of treatment. Getting yourself to a better place is a vital thing to do, and you should look for any sacrifices you can make to improve yourself and your life.

Grants

A potential option is to contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which provides grants to help fund your treatment if you cannot pay for your treatment because you have inadequate insurance coverage.

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There are details of the process you need to follow to obtain grants on the SAMHSA website.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program administered by your state. It provides payment for medical services for people who have low income, or who are unemployed. To qualify, you need to meet the income levels set by the government.

There are a number of rehab centers that will accept Medicaid patients. The funding is paid directly to your provider, and you may be asked pay a small part of the cost of treatment. This co-payment requirement is dependent on state rules.

There are numerous requirements that must be met to be eligible for funding; these may include your age, whether you are pregnant, disabled or blind; your income and any savings you may have or items you could sell to fund treatment is also considered. You are required to be a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant.

If you have a low income and are in one of the eligibility groups, you should apply for Medicaid.

Scholarships

There are some organizations that offer scholarships for people with low incomes. You should contact your chosen rehab provider to see if you are eligible for a scholarship. A number of providers can offer scholarships, and it is worth contacting your providers to see if they can support you, and if you meet their scholarship requirements.

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Low-cost or Free Options

There are also some low-cost, or even free options available to you via a range of organizations, including Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous. These offer self-help support groups where there is peer support, often following the 12-Step program.

12 Step Program

A twelve-step program is used to support recovery from addiction or compulsion. It was initially created by Alcoholics Anonymous in their 1939 book, Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The twelve step program has now been adopted by a number of organizations based on the original 12 steps:[3]

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human beings the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Individuals are often supported through the steps by a sponsor, a more experienced person who has gone through the process and can provide peer support.

The 12 step program is a well respected process, however only about 3% of people suffering from alcoholism and attending Alcoholics Anonymous involved in a study found recovery results without relapse from the 12-step programs treatment.[4] However, they can be used alongside or following other treatment to provide a peer network and ongoing support which may prevent future relapse for individuals.

Reference

[1]Professor Moshe Szyf: McGill University and Bar Ilan University
[2]Cost of Treatment: https://www.addiction.com/get-help/loved-one/paying-treatment-for-loved-one/
[3]Bill W. (June 2001). “Chapter 5: How It Works”
[4]Robert B. Cutler “Are alcoholism treatments effective? The Project MATCH data” BMC Public Health

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Last Updated on December 18, 2018

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

Why do I have bad luck? Is bad luck real?

A couple of months ago, I met up with an old friend of mine who I hadn’t seen since last year. Over lunch, we talked about all kinds of things, including our careers, relationships and hobbies.

My friend told me his job had become dull and uninteresting to him, and despite applying for promotion – he’d been turned down. His personal life wasn’t great either, as he told me that he’d recently separated from his long-term girlfriend.

When I asked him why things had seemingly gone wrong at home and work, he paused for a moment, and then replied:

“I’m having a run of bad luck.”

I was surprised by his response as I’d never thought of him as someone who thought that luck controlled his life. He always appeared to be someone who knew what he wanted – and went after it with gusto.

He told me he did believe in bad luck because of everything happened to me.

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It was at this point, that I shared my opinion on luck and destiny:

While chance events certainly occur, they are purely random in nature. In other words, good luck and bad luck don’t exist in the way that people believe. And more importantly, even if random negative events do come along, our perspective and reaction can turn them into positive things.

Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky and change your luck.

1. Stop believing that what happens in life is out of your control.

Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside yourself.

Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

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They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can. They have this Motivation Engine, which most people lack, to keep them going.

No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

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In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will drown yourself in negative energy and almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

Not long ago, a reader (I’ll call her Kelly) has shared with me about how frustrated she felt and how unlucky she was. Kelly’s an aspiring entrepreneur. She had been trying to find investors to invest in her project. It hadn’t been going well as she was always rejected by the potential investors. And at her most stressful time, her boyfriend broke up with her. And the day after her breakup, she missed an important opportunity to meet an interested investor. She was about to give up because she felt that she’d not be lucky enough to build her business successfully.

It definitely wasn’t an easy time for her. She was stressful and tired. But it wasn’t bad luck that was playing the role.

Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

I explained to Kelly that to improve her fortune and have “good luck”, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to her; then try to focus on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

Then Kelly tried to review her current situation objectively. She realized that she only needed a short break for herself — from work and her just broken-up relationship. She really needed some time to clear up her mind before moving on with her work and life. When she got her emotions settled down from her heartbreak, she started to work on improving her business’ selling points and looked for new investors that are more suitable.

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A few months later, she told me that she finally found two investors who were really interested in her project and would like to work with her to grow the business. I was really glad that she could take back control of her destiny and achieved what she wanted.

Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

What’s Next?

Now that you’ve learned the 2 simple things you can do to take control of your fate and create your own luck. But this isn’t it! These simple techniques you’ve learned here are just part of the essential 7 Cornerstone Skills — a skillset that will give you the power to create permanent solutions to big problems in life — any problem in any area of your life!

If you think you’re “suffering from bad luck”, you can really change things up and start life over with these 7 Cornerstone Skills. It may even be a lot easier than you thought:

How to Start Over and Reboot Your Life When It Seems Too Late

Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

“I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

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Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

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