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How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

Long term addiction can cause you serious problems; more than just the obvious health issues, an inability to work may leave you in a difficult financial position, and you may not have health insurance or any funding to allow you to pay for the rehabilitation program you need to recover.

However, there are solutions, and not having health insurance does not mean that you will not get into rehab. There are a number of possible options to finance a rehab program.

Why is rehab important?

You may feel that you don’t need rehab, and that you can quit drugs at any time without assistance; sadly, this is all too often the case. The way that drugs change your body through addiction will often take away you control, leaving you unable to quit without assistance.

Effectively recovering from drug or alcohol abuse will require professional support, not just for the physical effects of the addiction, but also the psychological issues.

You may feel that you have the strength to give up drugs alone by going ‘cold turkey’ and just stopping taking drugs; however, scientific research has shown this may make your addictions worse. In experiments it was found the addictive drive was stronger after a period of abstinence alone.[1]

What does rehab cost?

There is no one set price for treatment, and the costs vary greatly according to the type of treatment and the provider. However, the following will give you an idea of what the costs could be if you were not covered by insurance.[2]

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Type of TreatmentCost
Residential Treatment: Staying onsite at a specialized facility. Treatment may include one-on-one psychotherapy, group therapy, 12-step meetings, medication therapy, and other holistic approaches like yoga and mindfulness.$0 – $80,000 per month
Outpatient Treatment: Outpatient centers offer the same types of treatment as residential programs; however, as you don’t stay overnight, you can more easily continue to work or attend school while still fulfilling your treatment plan.c. $2,000 per month
Sober Living Homes: Previously known as Halfway-houses. These are live-in, drug-free living environments that offer peer support for recovery and long-term sobriety.$450 – $10,000 per month
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A common psychotherapeutic treatment for a variety of mental illnesses, including anxiety and mood disorders, as well as addiction. CBT focuses on questioning and changing negative and unproductive thoughts and beliefs in order to stop the triggers, behavior, and underlying emotions that contribute to mental illness and addiction.$100 per hour

c. $400 – $800 per month

Family And Couples Therapy: Sometimes called multidimensional family therapy, or MDFT, it is structured so that every member of the family has a voice. With the guidance of a professional therapist, the goal is to improve the interworking of each family’s relationships and their home life.$75 – 200 per hour

c. $300 – $1,600 per month

Drug Therapy: Medication can be used to help ease symptoms of withdrawal, and to prevent cravings that can lead to relapse.$21 – $1,000 per month

Possible options for funding rehab

There are a number of options to allow you to get the funding you need for treatment. One single option may not offer what you need, and you may need to combine more than one route to funding:

  • Loans or finance
  • State-funded treatment
  • Borrow or raise money
  • Grants
  • Medicaid
  • Scholarships

Loans or Finance

You should not give up hope if you are experiencing financial difficulties, or have no insurance. Many rehab providers understand the situation faced by people who have been suffering with addiction, and there are ways in which you can be supported.

Many providers may offer you a loan or finance offer, which will allow you to undergo the rehab you require, safe in the knowledge that you will have an affordable payment plan in the future. Generally, you will not start having to pay until you have completed your rehab.

Some credit card companies will offer deferred interest rate healthcare credit cards specifically for medical related expenses, including substance and mental health treatment. However, most providers will require you to have a good credit score; on average you would need a credit score of at least 640. If you do not have this you may do better to look at other options.

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State-Funded Treatment

Another available option is to use a state-funded treatment center. They are organizations that are funded by the state to support people who require rehab, but who do not have adequate insurance to cover commercial centers.

Funding for state-funded centers is limited, so there is likely to be a waiting list for a treatment program. The waiting time can vary from a month to over a year and a half depending on the state you are in.

However, if you can wait, this is an option for accessing healthcare professionals who can help you to recover.

Borrow or Raise Money

Can you borrow the funds you need from family, or perhaps raise money by selling items you have? You may be reluctant to ask your family for money; however, they may well be willing to help you if you are looking to work on a path towards recovery. Your family could pay all or part of your treatment costs as a gift, or a loan. If you have any savings, you could use these to pay for treatment; again, you may be reluctant, but you are taking a step which will improve your life, and if you recover you will not be spending money on alcohol or drugs.

The other option is to see if you have anything of value you could sell to go towards the cost of treatment. Getting yourself to a better place is a vital thing to do, and you should look for any sacrifices you can make to improve yourself and your life.

Grants

A potential option is to contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which provides grants to help fund your treatment if you cannot pay for your treatment because you have inadequate insurance coverage.

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There are details of the process you need to follow to obtain grants on the SAMHSA website.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program administered by your state. It provides payment for medical services for people who have low income, or who are unemployed. To qualify, you need to meet the income levels set by the government.

There are a number of rehab centers that will accept Medicaid patients. The funding is paid directly to your provider, and you may be asked pay a small part of the cost of treatment. This co-payment requirement is dependent on state rules.

There are numerous requirements that must be met to be eligible for funding; these may include your age, whether you are pregnant, disabled or blind; your income and any savings you may have or items you could sell to fund treatment is also considered. You are required to be a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant.

If you have a low income and are in one of the eligibility groups, you should apply for Medicaid.

Scholarships

There are some organizations that offer scholarships for people with low incomes. You should contact your chosen rehab provider to see if you are eligible for a scholarship. A number of providers can offer scholarships, and it is worth contacting your providers to see if they can support you, and if you meet their scholarship requirements.

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Low-cost or Free Options

There are also some low-cost, or even free options available to you via a range of organizations, including Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous. These offer self-help support groups where there is peer support, often following the 12-Step program.

12 Step Program

A twelve-step program is used to support recovery from addiction or compulsion. It was initially created by Alcoholics Anonymous in their 1939 book, Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The twelve step program has now been adopted by a number of organizations based on the original 12 steps:[3]

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human beings the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Individuals are often supported through the steps by a sponsor, a more experienced person who has gone through the process and can provide peer support.

The 12 step program is a well respected process, however only about 3% of people suffering from alcoholism and attending Alcoholics Anonymous involved in a study found recovery results without relapse from the 12-step programs treatment.[4] However, they can be used alongside or following other treatment to provide a peer network and ongoing support which may prevent future relapse for individuals.

Reference

[1]Professor Moshe Szyf: McGill University and Bar Ilan University
[2]Cost of Treatment: https://www.addiction.com/get-help/loved-one/paying-treatment-for-loved-one/
[3]Bill W. (June 2001). “Chapter 5: How It Works”
[4]Robert B. Cutler “Are alcoholism treatments effective? The Project MATCH data” BMC Public Health

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Last Updated on October 16, 2018

The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

It’s well past midnight and you’ve got to get up in less than six hours. You toss and turn all night. Before you know it, another hour passes by and you start panicking.

If I don’t get to sleep in the next 30 minutes, I’m going to be exhausted tomorrow!”

One thing is for sure, you’re not alone. Over 70M+ Americans have stated that they don’t get the proper sleep they need at night.[1] So what could possibly be causing this insomnia epidemic?

Throughout my entrepreneurial journey of building my language learning company, I have experimented and researched dozens of best sleep practices. Some have flopped but a few have dramatically improved the quality of my life and work.

In this article, I’ll look into the reason why you’re sleep deprived and how to sleep through the night tonight.

Why you can’t sleep through the night

The first step to improving anything is getting to the bottom of the root problem. Different studies have shown the reasons why most people cannot sleep well at night.[2] Here are the main ones that the average person faces:

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Stress

If you’ve ever stayed up at night worrying about something, know that it’s a major sleep inhibitor. When you’re feeling stress, your mind and body becomes more activated, making it incredibly difficult to fall asleep. Even when you do manage to sleep, it won’t be deep enough to help you feel rested the next day.

Exposure to blue light before sleep time

We’re exposed to harmful blue light on a daily basis through the use of our digital screens. If you’ve never heard of blue light, it’s part of the visible light spectrum that suppresses melatonin, our sleep hormones. Other harmful effects include digital eye strains and macular cellular damage.

While daytime exposure to blue light is not very harmful, night time exposure tricks our brain into thinking it’s daytime. By keeping your brain alert and suppressing melatonin, your mind is unable to shut down and relax before bedtime.

Eating close to bedtime

Eating too late can actually be an issue for many people, especially those who are older than 40. The reason is, eating before laying down increases the chances of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acid backflows into the esophagus.

Another reason not to eat too late is sleep quality. Even if you manage to sleep right after eating, it’s likely that you’ll wake up tired. Instead of letting your body rest during sleep, it has to digest the food that was entered before bedtime.

Rule of thumb: eat 3-4 hours before bedtime.

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Medical conditions

In some cases, it could be medical conditions that cause your sleep problems. If you can’t relate yourself to the above reasons or any of these common sleep problem causes, you should visit the doctor.

The vicious sleep cycle

The biggest danger to repeating the bad habits mentioned above is the negative cycle that it can take you through. A bad night’s sleep can affect not only your energy but your willpower and decision making skills.

Here’s an example of a bad sleep pattern:

You get a bad night’s sleep
–> You feel tired and stressful throughout the day.
–> You compensate it with unhealthy habits (for example junk food, skipping exercises, watching Netflix etc.)
–> You can’t sleep well (again) the next night.

    You can imagine what could happen if this cycle repeats over a longer period of time.

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    How to sleep better (throughout the night)

    To help you break the vicious cycle and stop waking up in the middle of the night, I’ll explain to you a list of actionable steps to solve your trouble staying asleep.

    1. Take control over the last 90 minutes of your night

    What you do (or don’t do) before bedtime have significant impact on the quality of your sleep. Many times, it can be the difference between staying up until 4am and sleeping like a baby.

    Here are a few suggestions:

    • Go from light to dark – Darkness stimulates production of the sleep hormone melatonin. Turn off unused light around the house, and think about investing into warm light that you can use in the bedroom before bedtime.
    • Avoid screens (or wear blue light blocking glasses) – Keep the bedroom a technology-free zone as the light from electronic devices can disturb your sleep. If you need to work, wear blue light blocking glasses (also known as computer glasses) throughout or before you sleep to prevent sleep disruption.
    • Find an activity that helps you to wind down  This could be anything that calms you down, and reduces thinking (especially unnecessary stress). Fir example, listening to soothing/good feel music, taking a hot bath, reading or meditating.
    • Keep any electronics you have on the other side of the room or outside the room – One of the most harmful things that can disrupt your sleep is the notifications you get from your smartphones. The simplest way to avoid this is to keep it away from you.
    • Create a bedtime routine – A night routine is a couple of things you do prior to going to bed. By doing these things every night, you’ll have a more restful and high-quality sleep. Learn how to pick up a night routine here: The Ultimate Night Routine Guide to Sleep Better and Wake Up Productive

    2. Eat the right nutrients (and avoid the wrong ones)

    What you eat (not just when we eat) plays a critical role in your sleep quality. If you’re ever in doubt of what to eat to improve your sleep, take the following into consideration:

    • Kiwi – This green fruit may be the ultimate pre-bed snack. When volunteers ate two kiwis an hour before hitting the hay, they slept almost a full extra hour. Kiwis are full of vitamins C and E, serotonin and folate—all of which may help you snooze.
    • Soy foods – Foods made with soy such as tofu, miso and edamame, are rich in isoflavones. These compounds increase the production of serotonin, a brain chemical that influences the body’s sleep-wake cycle.
    • Fiber-rich foods – Eating more fiber could be key for better sleep. Eating fiber was associated with more restorative slow-wave sleep—the more you eat, the better you sleep—per a study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Fiber prevents blood sugar surges that may lower melatonin. Get a fiber boost from beans, artichokes, bran cereal and quinoa.
    • Salmon – Most fish, especially salmon, halibut and tuna boost vitamin B6, which is needed to make melatonin— a sleep-inducing hormone triggered by darkness.

    3. Adjust your sleep temperature

    Once you’ve gone through the first 2 recommendations, the last step to experiment with is temperature. According to Sleep.org, the ideal temperature for sleep is 60-67 Farenheit. This may be cooler than what most people are used to, but keep in mind that our body temperature changes once we fall asleep.

    Rule of thumb: sleeping in cooler temperature is better for sleep quality than warmer temperature.

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    Find out how to maintain the optimal temperature to sleep better here: How to Sleep Faster with the Best Temperature

    Sleep better form now on

    Congrats on making it to the end of this guide on sleep. If you’re serious about taking the necessary steps in improving your sleep, remember to take it one step at a time.

    I recommend trying just one of the steps mentioned such as taking a hot bath, blocking out blue light at night, or sleeping in cooler temperature. From there, see how it impacts your sleep quality and you can keep doing what works, and throw away what doesn’t.

    As long as you follow these steps cautiously and diligently, I know you’ll see improved results in your sleep!

    Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

    Reference

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