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How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

How to Get Into Rehab if You Don’t Have Insurance

Long term addiction can cause you serious problems; more than just the obvious health issues, an inability to work may leave you in a difficult financial position, and you may not have health insurance or any funding to allow you to pay for the rehabilitation program you need to recover.

However, there are solutions, and not having health insurance does not mean that you will not get into rehab. There are a number of possible options to finance a rehab program.

Why is rehab important?

You may feel that you don’t need rehab, and that you can quit drugs at any time without assistance; sadly, this is all too often the case. The way that drugs change your body through addiction will often take away you control, leaving you unable to quit without assistance.

Effectively recovering from drug or alcohol abuse will require professional support, not just for the physical effects of the addiction, but also the psychological issues.

You may feel that you have the strength to give up drugs alone by going ‘cold turkey’ and just stopping taking drugs; however, scientific research has shown this may make your addictions worse. In experiments it was found the addictive drive was stronger after a period of abstinence alone.[1]

What does rehab cost?

There is no one set price for treatment, and the costs vary greatly according to the type of treatment and the provider. However, the following will give you an idea of what the costs could be if you were not covered by insurance.[2]

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Type of Treatment Cost
Residential Treatment: Staying onsite at a specialized facility. Treatment may include one-on-one psychotherapy, group therapy, 12-step meetings, medication therapy, and other holistic approaches like yoga and mindfulness. $0 – $80,000 per month
Outpatient Treatment: Outpatient centers offer the same types of treatment as residential programs; however, as you don’t stay overnight, you can more easily continue to work or attend school while still fulfilling your treatment plan. c. $2,000 per month
Sober Living Homes: Previously known as Halfway-houses. These are live-in, drug-free living environments that offer peer support for recovery and long-term sobriety. $450 – $10,000 per month
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): A common psychotherapeutic treatment for a variety of mental illnesses, including anxiety and mood disorders, as well as addiction. CBT focuses on questioning and changing negative and unproductive thoughts and beliefs in order to stop the triggers, behavior, and underlying emotions that contribute to mental illness and addiction. $100 per hour

c. $400 – $800 per month

Family And Couples Therapy: Sometimes called multidimensional family therapy, or MDFT, it is structured so that every member of the family has a voice. With the guidance of a professional therapist, the goal is to improve the interworking of each family’s relationships and their home life. $75 – 200 per hour

c. $300 – $1,600 per month

Drug Therapy: Medication can be used to help ease symptoms of withdrawal, and to prevent cravings that can lead to relapse. $21 – $1,000 per month

Possible options for funding rehab

There are a number of options to allow you to get the funding you need for treatment. One single option may not offer what you need, and you may need to combine more than one route to funding:

  • Loans or finance
  • State-funded treatment
  • Borrow or raise money
  • Grants
  • Medicaid
  • Scholarships

Loans or Finance

You should not give up hope if you are experiencing financial difficulties, or have no insurance. Many rehab providers understand the situation faced by people who have been suffering with addiction, and there are ways in which you can be supported.

Many providers may offer you a loan or finance offer, which will allow you to undergo the rehab you require, safe in the knowledge that you will have an affordable payment plan in the future. Generally, you will not start having to pay until you have completed your rehab.

Some credit card companies will offer deferred interest rate healthcare credit cards specifically for medical related expenses, including substance and mental health treatment. However, most providers will require you to have a good credit score; on average you would need a credit score of at least 640. If you do not have this you may do better to look at other options.

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State-Funded Treatment

Another available option is to use a state-funded treatment center. They are organizations that are funded by the state to support people who require rehab, but who do not have adequate insurance to cover commercial centers.

Funding for state-funded centers is limited, so there is likely to be a waiting list for a treatment program. The waiting time can vary from a month to over a year and a half depending on the state you are in.

However, if you can wait, this is an option for accessing healthcare professionals who can help you to recover.

Borrow or Raise Money

Can you borrow the funds you need from family, or perhaps raise money by selling items you have? You may be reluctant to ask your family for money; however, they may well be willing to help you if you are looking to work on a path towards recovery. Your family could pay all or part of your treatment costs as a gift, or a loan. If you have any savings, you could use these to pay for treatment; again, you may be reluctant, but you are taking a step which will improve your life, and if you recover you will not be spending money on alcohol or drugs.

The other option is to see if you have anything of value you could sell to go towards the cost of treatment. Getting yourself to a better place is a vital thing to do, and you should look for any sacrifices you can make to improve yourself and your life.

Grants

A potential option is to contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which provides grants to help fund your treatment if you cannot pay for your treatment because you have inadequate insurance coverage.

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There are details of the process you need to follow to obtain grants on the SAMHSA website.

Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal government program administered by your state. It provides payment for medical services for people who have low income, or who are unemployed. To qualify, you need to meet the income levels set by the government.

There are a number of rehab centers that will accept Medicaid patients. The funding is paid directly to your provider, and you may be asked pay a small part of the cost of treatment. This co-payment requirement is dependent on state rules.

There are numerous requirements that must be met to be eligible for funding; these may include your age, whether you are pregnant, disabled or blind; your income and any savings you may have or items you could sell to fund treatment is also considered. You are required to be a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant.

If you have a low income and are in one of the eligibility groups, you should apply for Medicaid.

Scholarships

There are some organizations that offer scholarships for people with low incomes. You should contact your chosen rehab provider to see if you are eligible for a scholarship. A number of providers can offer scholarships, and it is worth contacting your providers to see if they can support you, and if you meet their scholarship requirements.

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Low-cost or Free Options

There are also some low-cost, or even free options available to you via a range of organizations, including Alcoholics and Narcotics Anonymous. These offer self-help support groups where there is peer support, often following the 12-Step program.

12 Step Program

A twelve-step program is used to support recovery from addiction or compulsion. It was initially created by Alcoholics Anonymous in their 1939 book, Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism. The twelve step program has now been adopted by a number of organizations based on the original 12 steps:[3]

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human beings the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Individuals are often supported through the steps by a sponsor, a more experienced person who has gone through the process and can provide peer support.

The 12 step program is a well respected process, however only about 3% of people suffering from alcoholism and attending Alcoholics Anonymous involved in a study found recovery results without relapse from the 12-step programs treatment.[4] However, they can be used alongside or following other treatment to provide a peer network and ongoing support which may prevent future relapse for individuals.

Reference

[1] Professor Moshe Szyf: McGill University and Bar Ilan University
[2] Cost of Treatment: https://www.addiction.com/get-help/loved-one/paying-treatment-for-loved-one/
[3] Bill W. (June 2001). “Chapter 5: How It Works”
[4] Robert B. Cutler “Are alcoholism treatments effective? The Project MATCH data” BMC Public Health

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Last Updated on December 2, 2019

10 Powerful Ways to Stop Worrying and Start Living Today

10 Powerful Ways to Stop Worrying and Start Living Today

Plato knew that the body and mind are intimately linked. And in the late 1800s, the Mayo brothers, famous physicians, estimated that over half of all hospital beds are filled with people suffering from frustration, anxiety, worry and despair. Causes of worry are everywhere, in our relationships and our jobs, so it’s key we find ways to take charge of the stress.

In his classic book How to Stop Worrying and Start Living, Dale Carnegie offers tools to ditch excessive worrying that help you make a worry-free environment for your private and professional life.

These are the top 10 tips to grab worry by the horns and wrestle it to the ground:

1. Make Your Decision and Never Look Back

Have you ever made a decision in life only to second-guess it afterwards? Of course you have! It’s hard not to wonder whether you’ve done the right thing and whether there might still be time to take another path.

But keep this in mind: you’ve already made your decision, so act decisively on it and dismiss all your anxiety about it.

Don’t stop to hesitate, to reconsider, or to retrace your steps. Once you’ve chosen a course of action, stick to it and never waver.

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2. Live for Today, Package Things up in “Day-Tight Compartments”

You know that feeling: tossing, turning and worrying over something that happened or something that might, well into the wee hours. To avoid this pointless worrying, you need “day-tight compartments”. Much as a ship has different watertight compartments, your own “day-tight” ones are a way to limit your attention to the present day.

The rule is simple: whatever happened in the past or might happen in the future must not intrude upon today. Everything else has to wait its turn for tomorrow’s box or stay stuck in the past.

3. Embrace the Worst-Case Scenario and Strategize to Offset It

If you’re worried about something, ask yourself: “What’s the worst thing that could happen?” Could you lose your job? Be jailed? Get killed?

Whatever the “worst” might be, it’s probably not so world-ending. You could probably even bounce back from it!

If, for example, you lose your job, you could always find another. Once you accept the worst-case scenario and get thinking about contingency plans, you’ll feel calmer.

4. Put a Lid on Your Worrying

Sometimes we stress endlessly about negative experiences when just walking away from them would serve us far better.

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To make squashing that worry easier, try this strategy, straight from stock traders: it’s called the “stop-loss” order, where shares are bought at a certain price, and then their price development is observed. If things go badly and the share price hits a certain point, they are sold off immediately. This stops the loss from increasing further.

In the same manner, you can put a stop-loss order on things that cause you stress and grief.

5. Fake It ‘Til You Make It – Happiness, That Is

We can’t directly influence how we feel, but we can nudge ourselves to change through how we think and act.

If you’re feeling sad or low, slap a big grin on your face and whistle a chipper tune. You’ll find it impossible to be blue when acting cheerful. But you don’t necessarily need to act outwardly happy; you can simply think happier thoughts instead.

Marcus Aurelius summed it up aptly:

“Our life is what our thoughts make it.”

6. Give for the Joy of Giving

When we perform acts of kindness, we often do so with the expectation of gratitude. But harboring such expectations will probably leave you disappointed.

One person well aware of this fact was the lawyer Samuel Leibowitz. Over the course of his career, Leibowitz saved 78 people from going to the electric chair. Guess how many thanked him? None.

So stop expecting gratitude when you’re kind to someone. Instead, take joy from the act yourself.

7. Dump Envy – Enjoy Being Uniquely You

Your genes are completely unique. Even if someone had the same parents as you, the likelihood of someone identical to you being born is just one in 300,000 billion.

Despite this amazing fact, many of us long to be someone else, thinking the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. But living your life this way is pointless. Embrace your uniqueness and get comfortable with who you really are: How to Be True to Yourself and Live the Life You Want

8. Haters Will Hate — It Just Means You’re Doing It Right

When you’re criticized, it often means you’re accomplishing something noteworthy. In fact, let’s take it a step further and consider this: the more you’re criticized, the more influential and important a person you likely are.

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So the next time somebody talks you down, don’t let it get to you. Take it as a compliment!

9. Chill Out! Learn to Rest Before You Get Tired

Scientists agree that emotions are the most common cause of fatigue. And it works the other way around, too: fatigue produces more worries and negative emotions.

It should be clear, therefore, that you’ve got to relax regularly before you feel tired. Otherwise, worries and fatigue will accumulate on top of each other.

It’s impossible to worry when you are relaxed, and regular rest helps you maintain your ability to work effectively.

10. Get Organized and Enjoy Your Work

There are few greater sources of misery in life than having to work, day in, day out, in a job you despise. It would make sense then that you shouldn’t pick a job you hate, or even just dislike doing.

But say you already have a job. How can you make it more enjoyable and worry-free? One way is to stay organized: a desk full of unanswered mails and memos is sure to breed worries.

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Better yet, rethink about the job you’re doing: What to Do When You Hate Your Job but Want a Successful Career

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Featured photo credit: Tyler Nix via unsplash.com

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