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These Statistics On Our Cellphone Addiction Are Terrifying And More Alarming Than Ever

These Statistics On Our Cellphone Addiction Are Terrifying And More Alarming Than Ever

Ah, the cell phone, our trusty friend. It helps us pretend we’re busy when we don’t want to talk to the person next to us. It helps us keep connected to an endless stream of cat videos. We may also have a tendency to stare at it, with a glazed expression, endlessly waiting for a message that will never arrive. I jest, but the truth is that we have an increasingly unhealthy fixation to our smartphones, recent surveys suggest.

The following statistics show an alarming increase in cell phone addiction, with participants admitting to becoming increasingly disconnected with their actual surroundings in the name of ‘data connectivity’.

The average person checks a cell phone is 110 times a day

Human beings are naturally fidgety creatures. We touch our faces a crazy amount of times per day. We doodle to distraction, and we love gadgets. The ultimate modern person’s form of fidgeting though, is looking at their smartphones. Why did I just unlock my phone? Was I going to look at Twitter? Oh, I can’t remember, let’s look anyway!

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Recent research, collected by Android app Locket, monitored how many times its 150,000 users checked their phone in a day. They found that users did this a staggering 110 times a day,[1] whilst another study carried out by Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers found the average user checks their phone nearer to 150 times per day. That’s a lot of time that could be spent honing a discipline. A musical instrument could be a great way to channel that nervous fidgety energy, whilst reading helps us to become more focused.[2]

1 in 5 people aged 18-34 have used their smartphones during sex

Oh, the modern world! For every incredible benefit that technology brings us, there seems to be an equally compelling argument that it dulls us to distraction. In a survey carried out by Harris Interactive for ID verification startup Jumio, this surprising statistic came to light. Nearly 20 percent of young adult smartphone owners between the ages of 18 and 34 in the U.S. have said they use their smartphones during sex.[3]

No wonder new age positivity mind-set literature is turning into such a strong subculture. We need someone fighting the present tense’s corner when so many people seem so inclined to escape the moment they’re in. If someone can’t value the person they’re with during such an intimate act, what are the chances they place little value on other things that make their life what it is? Maybe it’s time to re-connect with the little things in life that make us happy.

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77% of parents and teens have argued about smartphone usage

A less surprising statistic perhaps, but no less worrying. According to a poll carried out by Common Sense Media, 50% of teens feel they have cell phone addiction, and the majority have argued with their parents over device usage.[4]

In an example of the sacrifices we’ll make to stay connected, Terry Greenwald, a father of three and custodian at a high school in Homer, Alaska, told CNN that the hallways where he works are often half-filled with “teenage zombies who are glued to their phones.”

50% of people feel uneasy when they leave phones at home

Is increased connectivity worth it if losing a device starts to feel like we’re losing control of our lives? This is already becoming a problem. A 2010 study by the UK Post Office found that nearly 53 percent of mobile phone users in Britain become anxious when they can’t use their devices. The reason was primarily that they feared missing calls or messages.

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Nomophobia. Remember the word.[5] The way things are going it’ll probably be in much more common usage in years to come.

Sadly, it’s important to note that missing a message doesn’t mean the end of the world. Some people in the tech industry take measures to drive this home. Steve Hilton, head of a Silicon Valley tech startup doesn’t use a phone.[6] Other bigwig CEO’s use flip phones as they feel the reduced functionality helps them to disconnect.[7]

26% of car accidents are caused by phone usage

Sadly, cell phone addiction can also lead to loss of life if a person is so attached to their phone that they use it recklessly. A recent NSC report has shown that 1 in 4 car accidents are caused by cell phone usage.[8] The NSC also feel that the statistics may be higher as not all drivers are willing to admit using their smartphones whilst driving.

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The findings also revealed the surprising statistic that only 5% of smartphone related crashes occur because the driver is texting. The majority occur whilst a driver is distracted talking on hands-free. There’s a very obvious solution to this. Unless it’s an emergency, the conversation can most likely wait.

Reference

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Christopher Young

Freelance Blogger, Writer and Journalist

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Last Updated on January 24, 2021

How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

How to Say No When You Know You Say Yes Too Often

Do you say yes so often that you no longer feel that your own needs are being met? Are you wondering how to say no to people?

For years, I was a serial people pleaser[1]. Known as someone who would step up, I would gladly make time, especially when it came to volunteering for certain causes. I proudly carried this role all through grade school, college, even through law school. For years, I thought saying “no” meant I would disappoint a good friend or someone I respected.

But somewhere along the way, I noticed I wasn’t quite living my life. Instead, I seem to have created a schedule that was a strange combination of meeting the expectations of others, what I thought I should be doing, and some of what I actually wanted to do. The result? I had a packed schedule that left me overwhelmed and unfulfilled.

It took a long while, but I learned the art of saying no. Saying no meant I no longer catered fully to everyone else’s needs and could make more room for what I really wanted to do. Instead of cramming too much in, I chose to pursue what really mattered. When that happened, I became a lot happier.

And guess what? I hardly disappointed anyone.

The Importance of Saying No

When you learn the art of saying no, you begin to look at the world differently. Rather than seeing all of the things you could or should be doing (and aren’t doing), you start to look at how to say yes to what’s important.

In other words, you aren’t just reacting to what life throws at you. You seek the opportunities that move you to where you want to be.

Successful people aren’t afraid to say no. Oprah Winfrey, considered one of the most successful women in the world, confessed that it was much later in life when she learned how to say no. Even after she had become internationally famous, she felt she had to say yes to virtually everything.

Being able to say no also helps you manage your time better.

Warren Buffett views “no” as essential to his success. He said:

“The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.”

When I made “no” a part of my toolbox, I drove more of my own success, focusing on fewer things and doing them well.

How We Are Pressured to Say Yes

It’s no wonder a lot of us find it hard to say no.

From an early age, we are conditioned to say yes. We said yes probably hundreds of times in order to graduate from high school and then get into college. We said yes to find work, to get a promotion, to find love and then yes again to stay in a relationship. We said yes to find and keep friends.

We say yes because we feel good when we help someone, because it can seem like the right thing to do, because we think that is key to success, and because the request might come from someone who is hard to resist.

And that’s not all. The pressure to say yes doesn’t just come from others. We put a lot of pressure on ourselves.

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At work, we say yes because we compare ourselves to others who seem to be doing more than we are. Outside of work, we say yes because we are feeling bad that we aren’t doing enough to spend time with family or friends.

The message, no matter where we turn, is nearly always, “You really could be doing more.” The result? When people ask us for our time, we are heavily conditioned to say yes.

How Do You Say No Without Feeling Guilty?

Deciding to add the word “no” to your toolbox is no small thing. Perhaps you already say no, but not as much as you would like. Maybe you have an instinct that if you were to learn the art of no that you could finally create more time for things you care about.

But let’s be honest, using the word “no” doesn’t come easily for many people.

3 Rules of Thumbs for Saying No

1. You Need to Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

Let’s face it. It is hard to say no. Setting boundaries around your time, especially you haven’t done it much in the past, will feel awkward. Your comfort zone is “yes,” so it’s time to challenge that and step outside that.

If you need help getting out of your comfort zone, check out this article.

2. You Are the Air Traffic Controller of Your Time

When you want to learn how to say no, remember that you are the only one who understands the demands for your time. Think about it: who else knows about all of the demands in your life? No one.

Only you are at the center of all of these requests. You are the only one that understands what time you really have.

3. Saying No Means Saying Yes to Something That Matters

When we decide not to do something, it means we can say yes to something else that we may care more about. You have a unique opportunity to decide how you spend your precious time.

6 Ways to Start Saying No

Incorporating that little word “no” into your life can be transformational. Turning some things down will mean you can open doors to what really matters. Here are some essential tips to learn the art of no:

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1. Check in With Your Obligation Meter

One of the biggest challenges to saying no is a feeling of obligation. Do you feel you have a responsibility to say yes and worry that saying no will reflect poorly on you?

Ask yourself whether you truly have the duty to say yes. Check your assumptions or beliefs about whether you carry the responsibility to say yes. Turn it around and instead ask what duty you owe to yourself.

2. Resist the Fear of Missing out (FOMO)

Do you have a fear of missing out (FOMO)? FOMO can follow us around in so many ways. At work, we volunteer our time because we fear we won’t move ahead. In our personal lives, we agree to join the crowd because of FOMO, even while we ourselves aren’t enjoying the fun.

Check in with yourself. Are you saying yes because of FOMO or because you really want to say yes? More often than not, running after fear doesn’t make us feel better[2].

3. Check Your Assumptions About What It Means to Say No

Do you dread the reaction you will get if you say no? Often, we say yes because we worry about how others will respond or because of the consequences. We may be afraid to disappoint others or think we will lose their respect. We often forget how much we are disappointing ourselves along the way.

Keep in mind that saying no can be exactly what is needed to send the right message that you have limited time. In the tips below, you will see how to communicate your no in a gentle and loving way.

You might disappoint someone initially, but drawing a boundary can bring you the freedom you need so that you can give freely of yourself when you truly want to. And it will often help others have more respect for you and your boundaries, not less.

4. When the Request Comes in, Sit on It

Sometimes, when we are in the moment, we instinctively agree. The request might make sense at first. Or we typically have said yes to this request in the past.

Give yourself a little time to reflect on whether you really have the time or can do the task properly. You may decide the best option is to say no. There is no harm in giving yourself the time to decide.

5. Communicate Your “No” with Transparency and Kindness

When you are ready to tell someone no, communicate your decision clearly. The message can be open and honest[3] to ensure the recipient that your reasons have to do with your limited time.

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How do you say no? 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

    Resist the temptation not to respond or communicate all. But do not feel obligated to provide a lengthy account about why you are saying no.

    Clear communication with a short explanation is all that is needed. I have found it useful to tell people that I have many demands and need to be careful with how I allocate my time. I will sometimes say I really appreciate that they came to me and for them to check in again if the opportunity arises another time.

    6. Consider How to Use a Modified No

    If you are under pressure to say yes but want to say no, you may want to consider downgrading a “yes” to a “yes but…” as this will give you an opportunity to condition your agreement to what works best for you.

    Sometimes, the condition can be to do the task, but not in the time frame that was originally requested. Or perhaps you can do part of what has been asked.

    Final Thoughts

    Beginning right now, you can change how you respond to requests for your time. When the request comes in, take yourself off autopilot where you might normally say yes.

    Use the request as a way to draw a healthy boundary around your time. Pay particular attention to when you place certain demands on yourself.

    Try it now. Say no to a friend who continues to take advantage of your goodwill. Or, draw the line with a workaholic colleague and tell them you will complete the project, but not by working all weekend. You’ll find yourself much happier.

    More Tips on How to Say No

    Featured photo credit: Chris Ainsworth via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Science of People: 11 Expert Tips to Stop Being a People Pleaser and Start Doing You
    [2] Anxiety and Depression Association of America: Tips to Get Over Your FOMO, or Fear of Missing Out
    [3] Cooks Hill Counseling: 9 Healthy Ways to Say “No”

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