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If You Learn This 10-20-30 Rule, Every Presentation You Give Will Be Excellent

If You Learn This 10-20-30 Rule, Every Presentation You Give Will Be Excellent

Very few of us enjoy creating presentations. It requires hours of uncertain work poring over slide after slide, hoping to get our message across. The greatest fear is watching our audience grow bored, frustrated, or occasionally even asleep. The same energy we had when we explained our great idea to our best friend last night never quite seems to make it across when we are presenting to a room of acquaintances or strangers. After everything is said and done, hours of preparation are wasted as our audience stands up and leaves after our presentation, presumably with no one having gained any special insight or motivation.

However, there is a way to change all that. There is a rock-solid method for creating presentations that will cut right to the heart of your subject matter, engaging your audience and provoking feedback and interest for days to come.

The 10-20-30 Presentation Method

The 10-20-30 rule was proposed by Guy Kawasaki [1]. And it is simple like this:

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Your Presentation Should

  • Be no more than 10 pages in length,
  • Require no more than 20 minutes to deliver,
  • And have no font size less than 30pt on any slide page.

Seems simple enough, right? But when you break it down into its individual components, the genius behind the system becomes clear.

10 Pages, No More

Our natural tendency is to throw out every bit of information we might have on the subject we are presenting on, hoping that some part of it might resonate with our audience.

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This is a mistake, according to Chris Anderson of Harvard Business Review. His said most presentations fail specifically because of length:

“The biggest problem I see in first drafts of presentations is that they try to cover too much ground.” [2]

Instead, you should try to focus on one specific topic. Start with an introduction, support your focused topic with maybe 3 or 4 slides, add in a story that will illustrate a real-world application of your point, and close with a call to action.

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The 20-Minute Marathon

In 1996, Professors Joan Middendorf and Alan Kalish of the University of Indiana produced a paper studying college students attending lectures.[3]

They made two interesting discoveries. First, adults seem to be able to only pay attention during a lecture for 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Secondly, during a 50-minute class period, students did not retain the information imparted to them most recently. They had better retention of the concepts and facts presented during the first 20 minutes of the lecture.

So make sure your presentation would not exceed 20 minutes! Otherwise no one would be really listening after the 20 minutes.

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30 Points to Success

Since we, as humans, respond so well to visual stimuli, one of the best ways to do that is to use large, easy-to-read text on your slides. So make sure the font size you’re using is at least 30.

Instead of endless lines of text, use a few words in a large, easy-to-read font supported by visual aids such as graphs, illustrations, and even photos that support the topic of your presentation.

The Perfect Presentation Is In Your Hands!

Using the 10/20/30 rule will give you complete control over your subject and your audience. The ability to engage your audience while they are still awake and interested is not to be underestimated. Your audience members will be talking about your presentation for days to come. Use this simple rule, and watch your engagement and feedback skyrocket!

Featured image credit: Gregor CresnarFreepik and Madebyoliver

Reference

More by this author

Jeremy C. Schofield

Independent Writer

If You Learn This 10-20-30 Rule, Every Presentation You Give Will Be Excellent

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Last Updated on May 17, 2019

This Is What Happens When You Move Out Of the Comfort Zone

This Is What Happens When You Move Out Of the Comfort Zone

The pursuit of worthwhile goals is a part of what makes life enjoyable. Being able to set a goal, then see yourself progress towards achieving that goal is an amazing feeling.

But do you know the biggest obstacle for most people trying to achieve their goals, the silent dream killer that stops people before they ever even get started? That obstacle is the comfort zone, and getting stuck there is bound to derail any efforts you make towards achieving the goals you’ve set for yourself.

If you want to achieve those goals, you’ll have to break free from your comfort zone. Let’s take a look at how your life will change once you build up the courage to leave your comfort zone.

What Is the Comfort Zone?

The comfort zone is defined as “a behavioural state within which a person operates in an anxiety-neutral condition, using a limited set of behaviours to deliver a steady level of performance.”

What stands out to me the most about that definition is the last part: “using a limited set of behaviours to deliver a steady level of performance.” How many successful people do you know who deliver a steady level of performance?

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The goal in life is to continually challenge yourself, and continually improve yourself. And in order to do that, you have move out of your comfort zone. But once you do, your life will start to change in ways you could never have imagined. I know because it’s happening right now in my own life.

Here’s what I’ve learned.

1. You will be scared

Leaving your comfort zone isn’t easy. In fact, in can be downright terrifying at times, and that’s okay. It’s perfectly normal to feel a little trepidation when you’re embarking on a journey that forces you to try new things.

So don’t freak out or get overwhelmed when you feel yourself getting a little scared. It’s perfectly normal and all part of the process. What’s important is that you don’t let that fear hold you back. You must continue to take action in the face of fear.

That’s what separates winners from losers.

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2. You will fail

Stepping out of your comfort zone means you’re moving into uncharted territory. You’re trying things that you’ve never tried before, and learning things you’ve never learned before.

That steep learning curve means you’re not going to get everything right the first time, and you will eventually fail when you move out of your comfort zone. But as long as the failures aren’t catastrophic, it can actually be a good thing to fail because …

3. You will learn

Failure is the best teacher. I’ve learned more from each one of my failures than I have from each one of my successes. When you fail small, and fail often, you rapidly increase the rate at which you learn new insights and skills. And that new knowledge, if applied correctly, will eventually lead to your success.

4. You will see yourself in a different way

Once you move out of your comfort zone, you immediately prove to yourself that you’re capable of achieving more than you thought was possible. And that will change the way you see yourself.

Moving forward, you’ll have more confidence in yourself whenever you step out of your comfort zone, and that increased confidence will make it more likely that you continue to step outside your comfort zone. And each time you do, you’ll prove to yourself again and again what you’re really capable of.

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5. Your peers will see you in a different way

Whether we want to admit or not, people judge other people. And right now, people view you in a certain way, and they have a certain idea of what you’re capable of. That’s because they’ve become accustomed to seeing you operate in your comfort zone.

But once you move out of your comfort zone, you’ll prove to other people, as well, that you’re capable of much more than you’ve shown in the past.

The increased confidence other people place in you will bring about more opportunities than ever before.

6. Your comfort zone will expand

The good thing about the comfort zone is that it’s flexible and malleable. With each action you take outside of your comfort zone, it expands. And once you master that new skill or action, it eventually becomes part of your comfort zone.

This is great news for you because it means that you can constantly increase and improve upon the behaviors that you’re comfortable with. And the more tools and skills you have at your disposal, the easier it will be to achieve your goals.

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7. You will increase your concentration and focus

When you’re living inside of your comfort zone, the bulk of your actions are habitual: automatic, subconscious, and requiring limited focus.

But once you move out of your comfort zone, you no longer rely on those habitual responses. You’re forced to concentrate and focus on the new action in a way you never do in your comfort zone.

8. You will develop new skills

Moving out of your comfort zone requires that you develop new skills. One of the many benefits you’ll experience is that you’ll be stepping away from the “limited set of behaviors” and start to develop your ability and expertise in new areas.

Living inside of your comfort zone only requires a limited skill set, and those skills won’t contribute much to your success. Once you can confidently step outside of your comfort zone and learn a new skill, there’s no limit to how much you can achieve.

9. You will achieve more than before

With everything that happens once you move out of your comfort zone, you’re naturally going to achieve more than ever before.

Your increased concentration and focus will help you develop new skills. Those new skills will change the way you see yourself, encouraging you to step even further out of your comfort zone.

Featured photo credit: Josef Grunig via farm3.staticflickr.com

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