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7 Timeless Tips To Increase The Range Of Your Router

7 Timeless Tips To Increase The Range Of Your Router

Are you one of those people who experience seemingly random disconnections while browsing the Internet, streaming music, movies or playing games online? Know that it may be because of poor signal strength from your router. This article will discuss some easy ways to increase the range of your wifi router.

1. Position Your Router On A Higher Place

It’s a fact that you wifi signal can’t pass through metals. Metal filing cabinets and pipes are possible barriers that can limit your wifi connection. The more barriers you have in between your computer and the router, the higher chances you have of interference. So, if you want to enjoy a strong signal throughout your home, try placing your router somewhere higher. Doing this helps to reduce interference and provide a clearer path for signals to reach out to devices.

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2. Change Your Router Antennas

When you first sign up for wifi service, your internet service provider gives you a default router with omnidirectional antennas, which isn’t of high quality. Most of the routers come removable antennas that you can replace with directional antennas aka high-gain antennas.

When you replace the default router antennas to the high-gain antennas, it will transmit signals in one particular direction, providing you with a better signal range and strength in that direction. You can boost the router range up to 25% to 40% if you place your access points according to the direction of the high-gain antennas.

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3. Increase The Transmit Power Of The Router

There are some routers that give you the option of increasing the transmit power. If you have such router, then set it to the maximum in order to get the highest possible range.

4. Update Your Router’s Firmware

The router’s firmware is like the brain of the device. Basically, it is the core software that enables the rest of the device to operate. Similar to other modern technologies, router manufacturers are continually striving to update their products and pushing out new tweaks in order to increase the performance/speed of the router and to fix security flaws. The majority of the latest routers will allow you to update the firmware from within the admin portal. If you don’t exactly know what to do, you can consult the user manual or contact your internet service provider for assistance.

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5. Opt For An Ideal Channel

When it comes to wireless routers, they broadcast on several different channels or frequencies. All the channels lie in the range of 2.5 GHz, but, depending on your surroundings, there are some factors that actually decide how the channel performs. Ask your service provider and select a channel or frequency that gives you the optimal, maximum range.

6. Install A Wireless Repeater

Have you heard about repeaters before? It’s an electronic hardware used to take signals from your router, boost its strength and then re-transmits it. For instance, if you have a router with a range of 100 feet, place the repeater (100ft) at 75 feet to make the total range 175 feet. Nowadays, wireless repeaters become so affordable and inexpensive, you can even use it for the home.

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7. Swap The Router Out Over Time

It’s a fact that the electronic components wear out with the passage of time and so is the case with your router. If your router is old, then it’s worn down components lose performance, which leads to slow processing of data and less power to transmit signals. So, replace your old router with the new one and you’ll definitely see the difference based on the higher quality of coverage you receive.

Remember you may have to try out a couple of these tips to find out which one best helps you increase the range of your router.

Featured photo credit: Computer Doctor Atlanta via farm8.static.flickr.com

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Yasmin Rasidi

Copy Writer at Swotfish

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Last Updated on October 15, 2019

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

To Automate or not to Automate Your Personal Productivity System

We are all about doing things faster and better around here at Lifehack. And part of doing things faster and better is having a solid personal productivity system that you use on a daily basis.

This system can be just about anything that helps you get through your mountain of projects or tasks, and helps you get closer to your goals in life. Whether it’s paper or pixels, it doesn’t really matter. But, since you are reading Lifehack I have to assume that pixels and technological devices are an important part of your workflow.

“Personal Productivity System” defined

A personal productivity system (at least the definition that this article will use) is a set of workflows and tools that allow an individual to optimally get their work done.

Workflows can be how you import and handle your photos from your camera, how you write and create blog posts, how you deploy compiled code to a server, etc.

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Tools are the things like planners, todo managers, calendars, development environments, applications, etc.

When automation is bad

You may be thinking that the more that we automate our systems, the more we will get done. This is mostly the case, but there is one very big “gotcha” when it comes to automation of anything.

Automation is a bad thing for your personal productivity system when you don’t inherently understand the process of something.

Let’s take paying your bills for example. This may seem very obvious, but if you can’t stick to a monthly budget and have trouble finding the money to make payments on time, then automating your bill payment every month is completely useless and can be dangerous for your personal finances.

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Another example is using a productivity tool to “tell you” what tasks are important and what to do next. If you haven’t taken a step back and figured out just how your productivity systems should work together, this type of automation will likely keep you from getting things done.

You can only automate something in your personal productivity system that have managed for a while. If you try to automate things that aren’t managed well already, you will probably feel a bit out of control and have a greater sense of overwhelm.

Another thing to remember is that some things should always be done by yourself, like responding to important emails and communicating with others. Automating these things can show your coworkers and colleagues that you don’t care enough to communicate yourself.

When automation is good

On the other hand, automation is a great thing for your personal productivity system when you understand the process of something and can then automatically get the steps done. When you know how to manage something effectively and understand the step-by-step process of a portion of your system, it’s probably a great time to automate it.

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I have several workflows that I have introduced in the last year that takes some of the “mindless” work from me so I can be more creative and not have to worry about the details of something.

On my Mac I use a combination of Automator workflows, TextExpander snippets, and now Keyboard Maestro shortcuts to do things like automatically touch-up photos imported from my iPhone 4S or open all the apps and websites needed for a weekly meeting to the forefront of my desktop by typing a few keys. Once you open yourself up to automating a few of your processes, you start to see other pieces of your system that can benefit from automation.

Once again; none of this works unless you understand your processes and know what tools you can use to get them done automatically.

The three steps to determine if something is “ripe” for automation

If your workflow passes these three steps, then automate away, baby:

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  1. You can do this process in your sleep and it doesn’t require your full, if any form of attention. It can (and has been) managed in some form prior to automating it.
  2. The process is time consuming.
  3. The process doesn’t require “human finesse” (ie. communicating and responding to something personally)

Automating your personal productivity systems can be a great for you in the long run if you are careful and mindful of what you are doing. You first need to understand the processes that you are trying to automate before automating them though. Don’t get stuck in thinking that anything and everything should be automated in your life, because it probably shouldn’t.

Pick and choose these processes wisely and you’ll find the ones that take up most of your time to be the best ones to automate. What have you automated in your personal productivity system?

Featured photo credit: Bram Naus via unsplash.com

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