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6 Less Known Things To See And Do In India

6 Less Known Things To See And Do In India

In India there is no time to sit: everywhere you turn, there is something to do, regardless if you’re traveling to this amazing country for the first time or you’re there for the 100th time. There is never time to get bored.

When I visited India for the first time I was overwhelmed by the sheer amount of things to see and experience, but those who were so mesmerized by it to make India their second home still find new things to do each day.

There is no shortage of amazing experiences in India, and here is a list of some of the best things you can do while visiting the country.

1. Chand Baori Stepwell in Abhaneri

In the small village of Abhaneri you won’t expect to find a wonderful scenery. However, the small village harbors the 1200 years old Chand Baori well, which is a water tank made by the order of King Chanda in 8000AD. The well is 30 meters deep and has 3500 steps placed in an intricate design which creates an amazing view. When you follow the stairs and get inside the well, look up at the statues of the Hindu gods which line the outer side of the well.

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    2. Golden Temple in Amritsar

    The Golden Temple in Amritsar is the place that never sleeps in India and it’s also among the holiest places in the country. The city itself was built near a bathing place with supposed miracle powers. The Golden Temple reflects the friendly spirit of the locals: foreigners and locals can sit in the same hall and have a short chat while eating a meal offered daily, for free, at the temple. Guests sit on the floor, enjoy their meal, then walk away when they are done to make room for other hundreds of guests. Outside the temple, you will see many people chatting and smiling to each other after eating together inside.

      3. Kukki’s Cave Paintings in Bundi

      Outside of Bundi, a man called Kukki discovered 1500 years old cave paintings and became famous. The man is not a trained archaeologist, but he’s probably more interesting than one, so you will never regret signing up for a tour with him. During the tour, you will see the cave paintings and some of the wildest parts of the area, including around Rajasthan. At the same time, he teaches his guests about the local history, leaving you with a memorable experience.

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        4. Akshardham and Gali Paranthe Wali in Delhi

        While the Taj Mahal is the best-known temple in India, Akshardham is definitely the biggest and the most impressive. Located net to Yamuna river, the Akshardham is a cultural complex that includes an amazing temple. The temple was built from the carvings of multiple Indian craft-masters and provides the visitors with an amazing view. Inside, there is more to see, as the entire history of the Hinduism was told in details on the walls, pillars, and ceiling.

        After visiting Akshardham you will definitely be hungry, so it’s time to have a walk along Gali Paranthe Wali, a food lane in the middle of the Delhi. Here you will find hundreds of locals who sell the same dish – parathas, but make it in their own, unique styles. When in Delhi, you must walk the walk of Gali Paranthe Wali!

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          5. Palolem beach in Goa

          Goa is India’s smallest state, but it offers big opportunities, especially when it comes to beaches. Palolem beach is one of Goa’s best places to enjoy the Indian beach experience. The area is clean and relaxed, so you can enjoy swimming or sun tanning without being disturbed by hundreds of other tourists. You will find expats, couples and locals on the beach, so you can make friends while enjoying the secluded beaches and the tasty food.

            6. Ranakpur Jain Temple in Ranakpur

            If you wander off the route that connects Jodhpur and Udairpur you will find a nice and quiet place called Ranakpur. The small village houses Ranakpur Jain temple, an amazing 15th-century building that was abandoned and resurrected, now being one of the most important Jain temples in the world. Each of the 1400 pillars is unique, offering an amazing view when you walk around the building. The entire area is very peaceful, so Ranakpur is the perfect place to reconnect with yourself.

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              This is a tiny piece of India, but I believe it’s just enough to make you visit India. Then you will return again and again!

              Featured photo credit: Akshardham via google.ro

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              Last Updated on April 8, 2020

              Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

              Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

              Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

              Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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              Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

              However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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              The leap happens when we realize two things:

              1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
              2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

              Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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              Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

              My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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              In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

              “Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

              Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

              More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

              Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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