Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2021

6 Less Known Things To See And Do In India

Advertising
6 Less Known Things To See And Do In India

In India there is no time to sit: everywhere you turn, there is something to do, regardless if you’re traveling to this amazing country for the first time or you’re there for the 100th time. There is never time to get bored.

When I visited India for the first time I was overwhelmed by the sheer amount of things to see and experience, but those who were so mesmerized by it to make India their second home still find new things to do each day.

Advertising

There is no shortage of amazing experiences in India, and here is a list of some of the best things you can do while visiting the country.

1. Chand Baori Stepwell in Abhaneri

In the small village of Abhaneri you won’t expect to find a wonderful scenery. However, the small village harbors the 1200 years old Chand Baori well, which is a water tank made by the order of King Chanda in 8000AD. The well is 30 meters deep and has 3500 steps placed in an intricate design which creates an amazing view. When you follow the stairs and get inside the well, look up at the statues of the Hindu gods which line the outer side of the well.

Advertising

2. Golden Temple in Amritsar

The Golden Temple in Amritsar is the place that never sleeps in India and it’s also among the holiest places in the country. The city itself was built near a bathing place with supposed miracle powers. The Golden Temple reflects the friendly spirit of the locals: foreigners and locals can sit in the same hall and have a short chat while eating a meal offered daily, for free, at the temple. Guests sit on the floor, enjoy their meal, then walk away when they are done to make room for other hundreds of guests. Outside the temple, you will see many people chatting and smiling to each other after eating together inside.

3. Kukki’s Cave Paintings in Bundi

Outside of Bundi, a man called Kukki discovered 1500 years old cave paintings and became famous. The man is not a trained archaeologist, but he’s probably more interesting than one, so you will never regret signing up for a tour with him. During the tour, you will see the cave paintings and some of the wildest parts of the area, including around Rajasthan. At the same time, he teaches his guests about the local history, leaving you with a memorable experience.

Advertising

4. Akshardham and Gali Paranthe Wali in Delhi

While the Taj Mahal is the best-known temple in India, Akshardham is definitely the biggest and the most impressive. Located net to Yamuna river, the Akshardham is a cultural complex that includes an amazing temple. The temple was built from the carvings of multiple Indian craft-masters and provides the visitors with an amazing view. Inside, there is more to see, as the entire history of the Hinduism was told in details on the walls, pillars, and ceiling.

After visiting Akshardham you will definitely be hungry, so it’s time to have a walk along Gali Paranthe Wali, a food lane in the middle of the Delhi. Here you will find hundreds of locals who sell the same dish – parathas, but make it in their own, unique styles. When in Delhi, you must walk the walk of Gali Paranthe Wali!

Advertising

5. Palolem beach in Goa

Goa is India’s smallest state, but it offers big opportunities, especially when it comes to beaches. Palolem beach is one of Goa’s best places to enjoy the Indian beach experience. The area is clean and relaxed, so you can enjoy swimming or sun tanning without being disturbed by hundreds of other tourists. You will find expats, couples and locals on the beach, so you can make friends while enjoying the secluded beaches and the tasty food.

6. Ranakpur Jain Temple in Ranakpur

If you wander off the route that connects Jodhpur and Udairpur you will find a nice and quiet place called Ranakpur. The small village houses Ranakpur Jain temple, an amazing 15th-century building that was abandoned and resurrected, now being one of the most important Jain temples in the world. Each of the 1400 pillars is unique, offering an amazing view when you walk around the building. The entire area is very peaceful, so Ranakpur is the perfect place to reconnect with yourself.

Advertising

This is a tiny piece of India, but I believe it’s just enough to make you visit India. Then you will return again and again!

Featured photo credit: Saksham Gangwar via unsplash.com

More by this author

6 Less Known Things To See And Do In India 20 Healthy And Tasty Vegan Breakfasts That Bring You Enough Protein 6 Things You Learn From Winter Camping The Ultimate Moving Guide For An Easy Move 6 Reasons You Should Date A Gamer (Girl or Boy)

Trending in Travel

1 29 Honeymoon Destinations You Should Not Miss 2 10 Best Family Vacation Destinations in Europe 3 Fear Of Traveling: 11 Reasons Why You Fear Traveling 4 How to Get the Most Out of Your First Solo Travel Experience 5 10 Best Tips for Traveling Internationally

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Advertising
5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

Advertising

Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

Advertising

The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

Advertising

Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

Advertising

So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

Advertising

Read Next