Advertising
Advertising

Caring Too Much Only Brings You To An Unwanted Destination, Adopt This Mindset Instead

Caring Too Much Only Brings You To An Unwanted Destination, Adopt This Mindset Instead

With the rapid development of different social media channels, we get opportunities to connect with people all over the globe. Social media allows a lot of feedback, whether it be negative or positive, to reach us. Moreover, it’s easy to feel depressed when seeing other people’s perfect lives displayed on their profiles and helpful to remember, other people’s opinion isn’t hurting us, it is how we look at them that hurts us more. On the upside, since we created this mindset, we can change it. All we need to do is learn how to prioritize better.

Dealing with facts

Let’s be honest, dealing with negative comments on social media is far from easy. The same goes for any type of social, personal, or professional situation in which our actions, opinions, beliefs, or physical appearance are being questioned, to say the least, but it’s up to us how much we let it interfere with our self-image.

Advertising

The facts are – you cannot make everyone like you… It just doesn’t work that way and it is for the better, actually. A wise man once said that trying to make everyone like you will only make you invisible in this world. Once you really understand this, your life will take a completely different turn.

You will experience huge relief once you realize that doing something just to please the masses will actually stop the progression of your own, unique potential and character. At the end of the day, you don’t want everyone to agree with you and share your opinion while wearing a mask just to conform. That will ruin your chances of meeting like-minded people because they will never get to see the real you.

Advertising

You only measure up to yourself

The internet, social media in particular, no matter how great may be, can impair our motivation and self-esteem. If we take a look at somebody’s perfectly staged social media pictures, we may feel bad about our boring lives. Or, if each time we get an idea or learn a new skill, we could find at least a thousand people who can do the same thing fifty times better. We can easily fall into a trap of wanting to be like other people whose lives and talents seem so much greater than our own.

There is nothing exciting about being just like everyone else. What is the point of that? Have you ever wondered why we love certain artists, leaders, or famous, successful entrepreneurs so much? It is because they were brave enough to be themselves, dream their own dreams, and look for their own ways of doing things. You don’t have any rivals nor do you have to measure your success against someone else’s. You don’t need to explain your choices to anyone. The only thing you should care about is being more you. As long as being you doesn’t harm anyone else, you can be content with who you are. Once you become laser-focused on you and your goals, aspirations, principles, and desires, the entire world can be against you and you won’t be affected. Ironically, once you become your authentic self, your authenticity will show in your personal and professional lives, and more people will like you.

Advertising

Support system

Building a support system to help you care less about irrelevant things doesn’t only involve surrounding yourself with people who respect and love you (even though it helps), but first and foremost, this means developing a sense of worthiness and belief in yourself. When we truly believe in ourselves, we don’t need anyone’s approval. Once we take it as our responsibility to grow a little more each day, we will be able to focus more on our strengths than on our shortcomings. This won’t leave you with extra time or energy to care about anything not related to your goals.

Featured photo credit: https://unsplash.com/ via unsplash.com

Advertising

More by this author

Ana Erkic

Social Media Consultant, Online Marketing Strategist, Copywriter, CEO and Co-Founder of Growato

Who Says All Introverts Hate Socializing? Here’s The Truth About Introvert And Extrovert Every Time You Drink A Beer, Remember To Drink The Same Amount Of Water You’re Exceptionally Creative If You See The Correct Image (Only 1/100 People Can Do This!) If You Have These 6 Struggles, You’re Highly Intelligent 15 Things To Stop Doing If You Want To Be Truly Happy

Trending in Psychology

1 11 Essential Philosophy Books That Will Open Your Mind 2 Can People Change When Changing Is So Difficult? 3 Psychologists Say It’s Really Possible To Change Our Personality 4 Why a Life Without Pain Is the Guarantee to True Suffering 5 4 Simple Ways to Make Boring Work Become Interesting

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on October 30, 2020

11 Essential Philosophy Books That Will Open Your Mind

11 Essential Philosophy Books That Will Open Your Mind

There are numerous ways to build your mindset, but none are as profound as reading philosophy books. Through these books, some of the greatest minds around ask questions and delve deep into thought.

While there isn’t always a clear and distinct answer to the many questions of philosophy, the entire field is a gateway to a higher sense of self. It gets you to think about all manner of things.

Below, we cover some of the essential philosophy books that are best for those who are just starting or looking to expand their mind.

How To Choose a Good Philosophy Book

Before getting to this list, we’ve researched ideal philosophy books to help you expand your mind.

We’ve found that the best philosophy books excel in the following criteria:

  • Complexity – Philosophy isn’t a subject that you can’t dive into immediately and understand everything. The books that we selected are great for people making the first leap.
  • Viewpoint – With philosophy, in particular, the author’s views are more important than in your standard book. We want to ensure the viewpoints and thoughts being discussed still hold up to this day.
  • Open-mindedness – Philosophy is all about asking perplexing questions and unraveling the answer. You might not reach a conclusion in the end, but these books are designed to get you to think.
  • Culture – The last criterion is culture. A lot of these books come from early philosophers from centuries ago or possibly from recent years. These philosophy books should paint a picture of the culture.

1. Meditations

    One that you’ll find on many of these types of lists is Meditations and for good reason. It’s the only document of its kind to ever be made. The book focuses on the private thoughts of the world’s most powerful man who advises himself revolving around making good on his responsibilities and the obligations of his position.

    We know enough about Marcus Aurelius to know that he was trained in stoic philosophy and practiced every night on a series of spirituality exercises. These exercises were designed to make him humble, patient, empathetic, generous, and strong in the face of whatever problem he had to face off. And he faced plenty of problems since he was basically the emperor of roughly a third of the planet.

    All of that is poured into this book, and you are bound to remember a line or more that will be applicable in your life. It’s a philosophy book staple.

    Buy Meditations here.

    Advertising

    2. Letters From a Stoic

      Similar to Marcus Aurelius, Seneca was another powerful man in Rome. He was a brilliant writer at the time and was the kind of guy to give great advice to his most trusted friends. Fortunately, much of his advice comes in letters, and those letters happen to be in this book. The letters themselves provided advice on dealing with grief, wealth, poverty, success, failure, education, and more.

      While Seneca was a stoic, he has a more practical approach and has borrowed from other schools of thought for his advice. As he said when he was alive, “I don’t care about the author if the line is good.” Similar to Meditations, there are several brilliant lines and advice that are still relevant to this day.

      Buy “Letters From a Stoic” here.

      3. Nicomachean Ethics

        Aristotle was a famous Greek philosopher at the time with profound knowledge. He’s named after a form of logic as well called Aristotelian logic. Through this book, Aristotle writes about the root of all Aristotelian ethics. In other words, this book contains the moral ideas that form a base for pretty much all of western civilization.

        Buy “Nicomachean Ethics” here.

        4. Beyond Good & Evil

          Friedrich Nietzsche played a big role in the philosophical world. He was one of the leading philosophers of the existential movement, and it all came through this particular book. He is a brilliant mind. However, the issue with a lot of his work is that it’s all written in German.

          Fortunately, this book is one of the slightly more accessible ones since it’s translated. Within the book, he breaks down the paradoxes of conventional understandings of morality. By doing this, he sets the stage for a lot of the 20th-century thought process that followed.

          Advertising

          Buy “Beyond Good & Evil” here.

          5. Meditations on First Philosophy

            In Meditations on First Philosophy, René Descartes breaks his book down into six meditations. The book takes a journalistic style that is structured much like a six-day course of meditation. On day one, he gives instructions on discarding all belief in things that are not guaranteed. After that, he tries to establish what can be known for sure. Similar to Meditations, this is a staple and influential philosophical text that you can pick up.

            Buy “Meditations on First Philosophy” here.

            6. Ethics

              Written by Benedict de Spinoza, this came at a time during the Age of Enlightenment. Enlightenment was a movement that dominated the world of ideas in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries and with that, many schools of thought emerged and were presented through books.

              Out of the many influential philosophy books published back then, Ethics dominated during this period as it discussed the basis of rationalism. Even though we’ve developed further beyond that, Ethics can introduce new ways of thinking from this particular school of thought.

              Buy “Ethics” here.

              7. Critique of Pure Reason

                Immanuel Kant is another great philosopher who brought together two of history’s biggest opposing schools of thought into a single book. Those schools being rational thought and empirical experiential knowledge—knowledge gained through experience.

                Advertising

                In Critique of Pure Reason, Kant explores human reason and then works to establish its illusions and get down to core constituents. Overall, you can learn more about human behavior and thought processes and thus, open your mind more to how you think and process everything around you.

                Buy “Critique of Pure Reason” here.

                8. On the Genealogy of Morals

                  Another piece of work from Nietzsche that is accessible to us is On the Genealogy of Morals. According to Nietzsche, the purpose of this book is to call attention to his previous writings. That said, it does more than that so you don’t need to worry so much about reading his other books.

                  In this book, he expands on the cryptic aphorisms that he brings up in Beyond Good and Evil and offers a discussion or morality in a work that is more accessible than a lot of his previous work.

                  Buy “On the Genealogy of Morals” here.

                  9. Everything Is F*cked

                    The only book on this list that’s been written in the past few years, this book by Mark Manson aims to explain why we all need hope while also accepting that hope can often lead us to ruin too.

                    While many of the books on this list are all practical, this one is the most realistic one since not even the greatest of philosophical minds could predict things like technology, Twitter, and how our political world has shaped.

                    Manson delivers a profound book that taps into the minds of our ancestral philosophers, such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Tom Waits, and digs deep into various topics and how all of it is connected—religion and politics, our relationship with money, entertainment, and the internet.

                    Advertising

                    Overall, this book serves as a challenge to all of us—a challenge to be more honest with ourselves and connect with the world in a way we’ve never tried before.

                    Buy “Everything Is F*cked” here.

                    10. Reasons and Persons

                      One of the most challenging philosophy books to read on this list, Reasons and Persons will send you on quite the trip. Through a lot of painstaking logic, Derek Parfit shows us some unique perspectives on self-interest, personhood, and whether our actions are good or evil.

                      Considered by many to be an important psychological text around the 20th century, the arguments made about those topics will open your mind to a brand new way of thinking.

                      Buy “Reasons and Persons” here.

                      11. The Republic of Plato

                        Written by Plato himself, this book is the origin of political science and offers a brilliant critique of government. As you would expect, the critique is still important today. If you’re looking to understand the inner thoughts of Plato, this is one of the best books around.

                        Buy “The Republic of Plato” here.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Philosophy books take a while to digest as they provide profound knowledge and leave you with many questions. With many of these philosophy books, you need to take your time with them, and you might have to read through them a few times as well. And with every read, your mind will only expand.

                        More Books to Open Your Mind

                        Featured photo credit: Laura Chouette via unsplash.com

                        Read Next