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5 Things Startups Should Consider Before Outsourcing Software Development

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5 Things Startups Should Consider Before Outsourcing Software Development

It is not unheard of for startups to outsource some parts of their software development. There is a host of reasons why most startups resort to outsourcing rather than hiring an in-house software developer. The reasons could range from cost, the need for different expertise, a lack of time to develop the software alone, to the need to put the task in more experienced hands.

For whatever reason, there are key factors a startup should consider before taking the plunge into outsourcing software development. Below is a rundown of some of those key considerations startups should consider.

1. Nature of the Software

Before you outsource your software development to another company, it is important to understand if it is your key competency/competencies. (“Key competency” means are important qualities deemed by the company that an employee should possess.) The rule of thumb is that you do not outsource your key competency/competencies whatever the circumstances.

Entrusting your startup’s ‘secret sauce’ to a third party is similar to relinquishing control of your company.

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If the software is not at the core of your business, you may proceed to hire an independent software developer.

In the same vein, is the software operational or creative? Good practice is only to outsource operational products such as reservation systems or process automation— systems which may be large but mundane. For creative products like chip design programs, consumer games, or architectural renderings, do them in-house.

Also, is it a software product or a software service?

Software developers will agree that once a software product is written, it usually doesn’t need lots of effort and skill to deliver it to clients.

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Not so with software service. Software service is often customized for a specific need. Therefore, outsourcing service software almost always never works and needs to be managed carefully.

2. Technology Standard

Whether to outsource or not is also predicated on the technology standard of the software. If you intend for the technology to feature the most up-to-date technologies; to be scalable to handle many millions of users, and to feature multi-system failover and recovery, then you need to do it in-house. Don’t outsource. However, if it is simple software, opt for the lowest cost solution which is outsourcing.

3. Cost

Cost is among the most crucial considerations when it comes to getting any service or product. Outsourcing may provide you a cheaper cost depending on what you want accomplished.

When considering outsourcing, always think about the costs in the short run versus the long run.  Usually, outsourcing tends to provide better costs in the short run, but may not in the long run.

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You should also be able to identify what the other indirect costs are to see if outsourcing is the best option.

4. Intellectual Property Considerations

As you prepare to entrust your software development to a different independent company, it is important to understand that some legal jurisdictions have little, if any, respect for software as intellectual property. For instance, you may be aware that approximately 90 percent of software used in Vietnam and China is pirated.

Fortify your intellectual property against any theft and misuse by coming up with contracts and non-disclosure agreements.

 5. Ability to Get the Skills When They Are Needed

Most businesses need the input of a diverse range of resources and skills which you might not be able to acquire full time.

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For example, you might not be able to afford software architects, designers, and testers as full-time employees. The beauty with outsourcing is that it will permit you to access the resources when and as you need them.

Conclusion

If you have a typical startup and you agree with your co-founders to work on the first product without pay, that’s fine. Software outsourcing in such a case may not be appropriate.

However, if your firm is not software oriented and you need some software-related work to be done, you can consider outsourcing rather than hiring a team of software developers.

It’s for you to decide!

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via static.pexels.com

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Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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