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Seven Ways to Ease the Stresses of Solo Travel

Seven Ways to Ease the Stresses of Solo Travel

There are a lot of benefits to traveling alone. You don’t have to accommodate anyone else so you can tailor the trip to your own preferences. Spending quality time with yourself means getting to know yourself better. By challenging your comfort zone, you can develop a stronger sense of resilience. The list goes on.

In spite of these benefits, solo travel is not without its stresses. The very thing that makes solo travel great—being completely on your own—is also what makes it more challenging than traveling with a companion. You alone are responsible for your safety, sanity, and enjoyment during your trip.

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Fortunately, a lot of this stress can be minimized with a few simple strategies. Here’s how to ease the stresses of solo travel so you can focus on the benefits.

Plan in advance.

Preparation is a strong antidote to anxiety, so if you’re traveling solo it’s a good idea not to show up in a new locale without a single plan. Instead, research your destination in advance. Make sure you’re adhering to any visa or passport regulations if you’re traveling abroad, familiarize yourself with the geographic layout of the region, make a list of must-see attractions, and develop a general itinerary before you embark on your trip.

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Pack light.

Lugging around a giant suitcase (or several) is stressful for any traveler, but it’s even more stressful when you have no one to help you lift luggage into overhead bins or haul it down subway stairs. Plus, struggling with too much luggage can draw unwanted attention when you’re traveling in a foreign place. For the sake of your back, your mobility, and your dignity, aim to pack light when you’re traveling alone.

Focus on the first night.

The most stressful part of a trip is typically the arrival. You’re tired from traveling and disoriented from being in a new place. That can make finding accommodations very challenging—especially when you don’t have a companion to help navigate. Make it easier on yourself by booking a hotel for your first night before you arrive. Also aim to arrive before sunset if possible. It’ll be much easier to navigate a new city in daylight than after dark.

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Designate backups.

It can be nerve-wracking to travel alone because you don’t have anyone nearby on whom you can call for help. Nor do you have a companion who can help you navigate unfamiliar places or feel safer on the street. You can relieve these anxieties by designating an emergency contact before you leave for your trip. Ask them to remain responsive while you’re away, and keep their contact info. with you at all times. Every day, text them your general plans for the day so somebody has a sense of your whereabouts in the case of an emergency.

Enlist local help.

When you’re alone in a new city, who better to help you get your bearings than someone who knows the city like the back of their hand? That’s the premise behind the reinvigorated interest in concierge services, which exist at hotels and beyond. For example, City CoPilot in New York City offers a variety of services including luggage storage, airport transportation, and discounts on local tours and attractions. Getting a little help from people in the know can be a godsend when you’re traveling alone.

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Keep your phone charged.

When you’re traveling alone, you’re more likely to rely on your phone than when you’re traveling with companions. You’ll need it to touch base with your emergency contact (see above), look up directions, browse Reddit if you feel awkward eating dinner alone, and so on. It’s imperative to make sure you won’t run into any data caps before you leave and that you keep your phone charged during the entirety of your trip.

Bring entertainment.

At first being alone with your thoughts can feel like a sumptuous escape from the daily grind, but the longer a solo trip drags on, the more you risk starting to feel bored. It’s good to be prepared with entertainment in the event that boredom kicks in. Bring along a book or journal, download podcasts or movies to your phone or tablet, or invest in Sudoku books or other brain challengers. These will definitely come in handy on long flights or train rides or during quiet nights in a hotel.

No matter where in the world you’re traveling, these seven strategies will help you minimize the stresses of solo travel. You can focus on having the time of your life!

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Dan Scalco

Director of Marketing

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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