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Prefer Alone Time To Social Gatherings? Science Says It’s Because You’re Highly Intelligent

Prefer Alone Time To Social Gatherings? Science Says It’s Because You’re Highly Intelligent

There’s nothing wrong with wanting some alone time. Perhaps you’re someone who would actually prefer to spend time by yourself at home or away from others instead of going to that social gathering that’s been looming for the past month and you promised you’d go to. If so, you’re not the only one and research has found that the happier you are with less social interaction, the higher your I.Q is.

Does Wanting More Alone Time Really Mean You’re More Intelligent?

Researchers recently published a study in The British Journal of Psychology [1] that looked into how intelligence, population density, and friendship affect modern happiness. While the conventional results showed that the more social interaction people have, the happier they feel, it wasn’t true for all people.

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They surveyed 15,000 people between the ages of 15 and 28 and noticed a surprising pattern – People at the higher end of the I.Q. spectrum reported being less satisfied with social interaction including just hanging out with friends.

The lead authors of the study, Satoshi Kanazawa and Norman Li said that their findings found those with a lesser I.Q. had more social interactions with their close friends and reported greater happiness. However, opposite results were reported by the more intelligent people.

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“The effect of population density on life satisfaction was therefore more than twice as large for low-IQ individuals than for high-IQ individuals,” they found. And “more intelligent individuals were actually less satisfied with life if they socialised with their friends more frequently.”

Why Do More Intelligent People Prefer Time Alone?

So why is it that more intelligent people shy away from parties and meeting up with friends? Perhaps you’re one of them or know someone in your social circle who you have to spend vast amounts of time convincing to say yes to going out. Either way, there is a reason for their lack of social participation and it’s down to what they tend to focus on.

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People with higher I.Q.s are much more likely to spend less time socializing and more time focusing on a longer term objective. In other words, socializing is taking away their focus from important work or just interrupting their focused flow on a project. Think of the writer who locks himself away to write his novel, or the doctor working on research to cure cancer.

It’s thought that taking away important time to work on these types of higher goals or objectives in their career will make an intelligent person less satisfied with life overall.

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Mismatch In Evolution?

The researchers’ results suggest that our modern brains are still very similar to the brains of our hunter-gather ancestors in terms of social interactions. Back when tribes were very small, getting along with your peers for the sake of your overall happiness, well-being and survival was paramount and explains why we take so much from having a good circle of people to be social with.

However, it’s thought the more highly intelligent among us are better adapted to the challenges of modern life and may find it easier to leave behind our ingrained need to socialize to be happy and adapt to the need to forge ahead on developing modern intellectual theories and concepts.

Despite the results, this isn’t to say intelligent people can’t or won’t enjoy socializing if need be, they just prefer to have more time for themselves to focus more on their thoughts and ideas. After all, happiness is found in many different ways for different people.

Reference

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26847844

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Jenny Marchal

A passionate writer who loves sharing about positive psychology.

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Last Updated on March 17, 2020

4 Simple Ways to Make Boring Work Become Interesting

4 Simple Ways to Make Boring Work Become Interesting

Are you bored at work right now?

Sitting at your desk, wishing you could be anywhere other than here, doing anything else…?

You’re not alone.

Even when you have a job you love, it’s easy to get bored. And if your job isn’t something you’re passionate about, it’s even easier for boredom to creep in.

Did you know it’s actually possible to make any job more interesting?

That’s right.

Whether it’s data entry or shelf stacking, even the most mind-numbing of jobs can be made more fun.

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Understanding the science behind boredom is the first step to beating it.

Read on to learn the truth about boredom, and what you can do to stop feeling bored at work for good.

VIDEO SUMMARY

I’m bored – as you’re watching the same film over and over again, even though it’s your favorite one

When you experience something new, your brain releases opioids – chemicals which make you feel good. [1]

It’s the feeling you might get when you taste a new food for the first time, watch a cool new film, or meet a new person.

However, the next time you have the same experience, the brain processes it in a different way, without releasing so many feel-good chemicals.

That’s why you won’t get the same thrill when you eat that delicious meal for the tenth time, rewatch that film again, or spend time with the same friend.

So, in a nutshell, we get bored when we aren’t having any new experiences.

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Now, new experiences don’t have to be huge life changes – they could be as simple as taking a different route to work, or picking a different sandwich shop for lunch.

We’re going to apply this theory to your boring job.

Keep reading find out how to make subtle changes to the way you work to defeat boredom and have more fun.

Your work can be much more interesting if you learn these little tricks.

Ready to learn how to stop feeling so bored at work?

We’ve listed some simple suggestions below – you can start implementing these right now.

Let’s do this.

Make routine tasks more interesting by adding something new

Sometimes one new element is all it takes to turn routine tasks from dull to interesting.

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Maybe there’s a long drive you have to make every single week. You get so bored, going the same old route to make the same old deliveries.

Why not make it a routine to create a playlist of new music each Sunday, to listen to on your boring drive during the week?

Just like that, something you dread can be turned into the highlight of your day.

For other routine tasks, you could try setting a timer and trying to beat your record, moving to a new location to complete the task, or trying out a new technique for getting the work done – you might even improve your productivity, too.

Combine repetitive tasks to get them out of the way

Certain tasks are difficult to make interesting, no matter how hard you try.

Get these yawn-inducing chores out of the way ASAP by combining them into one quick, focused batch.

For example, if you hate listening to meeting recordings, and dislike tidying your desk, do them both at the same time. You’ll halve the time you spend bored out of your mind, and can move onto more interesting tasks as soon as you’re done.

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Break large tasks into small pieces and plan breaks between them

Feeling overwhelmed can lead you to procrastinate and get bored. Try breaking up large tasks into lots of small pieces to keep things manageable and fun.

Try breaking up a 10,000 word report into 1000-word sections. Reward yourself at the end of each section, and you’ll get 10 mini mood boosts, instead of just one at the end.

You can also plan short breaks between each section, which will help to prevent boredom and keep you focused.

Give yourself regular rewards, it can be anything that makes you feel good

Make sure you reward yourself for achievements, even if they feel small.

Rewards could include:

  • Eating your favourite snack.
  • Taking a walk in a natural area.
  • Spending a few minutes on a fun online game.
  • Buying yourself a small treat.
  • Visiting a new place.
  • Spending time on a favourite hobby.

Your brain will come to associate work with fun rewards, and you’ll soon feel less bored and more motivated.

Boredom doesn’t have to be a fact of life.

Make your working life feel a thousand times more fun by following the simple tips above.

Reference

[1] Psychology Today: Why People Get Bored

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