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5 Best HDR Software For Mac Users to Try in 2017

5 Best HDR Software For Mac Users to Try in 2017

Every photographer strives to take that perfect shot. While a natural eye, great timing, and a high-end camera will get you close, the truth is that creating perfection is only possible with software that enhances the raw material.

HDR software is designed to help visual artists capture the true depth of imagery, and present it to their audience. But as with any software, each one offers a different set of benefits.

If you’re looking for the best suite, try packages with a trial period, or talk to colleagues about what they recommend. Editing is a personal, expressive process, so take your time.

So, what is the best HDR software for Mac?

1. Aurora HDR

This Mac-only suite is as close to perfection as possible.

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Billed as a one-stop shop for editors, Aurora HDR offers users the perfect balance of simplicity and power. The interface is simple and easy to use, with a range of presets that can be reset at the touch of a single button.

The ability to create natural and hyper-real imagery is a real testament to software.

Overall, it’s the best product on the market and is affordable too.

2. Machinery HDR

As contradictory as it sounds, a lot of HDR fanatics use their equipment to achieve greater realism in their images.

A skill in itself, recreating the world calls for a good camera and an editing suite that’s less about creating fantasy and more about subtlety.

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Machinery HDR is a Windows-run suite that’s easy to install and simple to use thanks to a drag-and-drop interface. It also includes a range of presets for quick touch ups but has a depth of options that won’t take your images straight into the over-produced space.

It’s an affordable, agile option for the purists.

3. HDR Darkroom

Capable of running on either Windows or Mac OS, HDR Darkroom is touted as a big hitter across various HDR platforms and forums.

It’s a blend between technical and easy to use – you can expect the convenience of automatic DE ghosting, but because you’re working with RAW files, there’s no drag and drop interface.

For more advanced users there are 3 tone mapping options, which, when coupled with the manual options, means you should be able to get the effects that you’re looking for.

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If you’re prone to using JPEGs, you might want to check out rumors that the upload is a bit heavy on the magenta, although this is not consistently reported.

While the functionality you get is a step up, whether it justifies the steep price tag (around $90) is debatable. If you’re looking to invest, then you might want to research more popular suites.

4. HDR Projects 4

This suite is like a utility knife. It has all the advanced features you need, coupled with a range of presets for smaller changes.

Most impressive is the seamless integration with Lightroom, which is included in the suite. The ability to edit across both offers a real range of creative possibility and provides the opportunity to generate enhanced, natural images or more creative visions.

Although there are countless options to edit the presets, these can be a little tedious. Therefore, many choose to incorporate Lightroom and tweak presets. This software is not for beginners, but a solid option if you are a more seasoned editor searching to create a distinctive personal style.

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5. easyHDR

As the name suggests, easyHDR is an entry-level suite designed to help you come to grips with the possibilities of HDR software.

The interface is simple and intuitive, allowing you to manipulate JPEGs and raw files by merging an array of exposures. It comes with a handy Lightroom plugin and a series of preset features for quick edits and updates.

There is also a tool for removing unwanted objects, correcting the alignment of your image, and even noise removal filters.

While this is a good way to start developing an understanding of image editing, the use of presets and filters is better for aspiring photographers. True artists looking to really design their images and evoke distinct textures and tones will probably want a more advanced program, but this software provides a good starting point for those just getting into editing.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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Ryan Kh

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Last Updated on May 14, 2019

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

8 Replacements for Google Notebook

Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

  1. Zoho Notebook
    If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
  2. Evernote
    The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
  3. Net Notes
    If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
  4. i-Lighter
    You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
  5. Clipmarks
    For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
  6. UberNote
    If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
  7. iLeonardo
    iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
  8. Zotero
    Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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