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Ten Ways to get Kids (and Adults) to eat Their Veggies

Ten Ways to get Kids (and Adults) to eat Their Veggies

Let’s face it. Vegetables are not the first food group that children look forward to at dinner. When has your kid asked for seconds of spinach? Desserts have their own menu for a reason. Despite their lack of popularity, vegetables are a necessary part of a kids’ diets. They provide the vitamins and minerals necessary for healthy physical and cognitive growth and lower obesity rates.

The Center for Disease Control states that child obesity rates have more than doubled in the past 30 years in the United States and that the percentage of children age six to eleven years who are obese increased from seven percent in 1980 to nearly eighteen percent in 2012. Obese youth are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure. A 2007 study published in the Journal of Pediatrics noted that in a population-based sample of five- to seventeen-year-olds, 70 percent of obese youth had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

Now that the depressing stuff is out of the way, let’s get on to the fun stuff, shall we? If you really want your kids to eat those veggies, you must do what all good parents do: lie to your kids. Here are some tasty recipes designed to trick your kids (and some adults) into eating their vegetables.

Note that I do not represent any of the websites or advertisers for the recipes pages below. Nor am I a certified nutritionist. I’m someone who thinks nutrition is important and thinks it’s a good idea for kids (and grown-ups) to eat their veggies.

Red Beet Pancakes

    Beet Pancakes

    Beets are very good for you. They are high in vitamin C and fiber and are chock-full of essential nutrients like B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. One of my friends introduced these to her daughter (and husband) as “Pink Princess Pancakes”. Verdict? Pink Princess Pancakes were a hit. Beets are not normally at the top of the yummy chart for most kids (or adults), but these make a great breakfast option.

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    Beet ice cream

      Beet Ice Cream

      Yes, beet ice cream. You wouldn’t think that the combination works, but it does. This recipe calls for cayenne pepper if you want a little kick, but it can always be omitted. Play around with it. Adding a few dark chocolate chips doesn’t hurt either!

      Zucchini Pancakes

        Zucchini Pancakes

        Zucchini is a great vegetable to add to dishes. Shredded zucchini doesn’t have an overpowering taste and it contains all kinds of nutrients such as vitamin A, magnesium, folate, potassium, and a high content of omega-3 fatty acids, zinc, niacin, and protein. Another good thing is that it is easy to hide. Pancakes are just one example.

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        Chocolate Zucchini Cake

          Chocolate Zucchini Cake

          This is probably one of my favorites. It is a great dessert and if you don’t tell your kids (or pretty much any adult) it’s in there, the zucchini is pretty hard to differentiate from the awesomeness of the chocolate.

          Quinoa Black Bean Corn Salad

            Quinoa, Black Bean and Corn Salad

            This recipe wasn’t just made for kids; it was made by a kid. Eleven-year-old Haile Thomas created this dish which earned her a trip to the first Kids State Dinner at the White House. Quinoa is very rich in protein and fiber and is one of the few plant foods that contain all nine essential amino acids. Black beans are very fibrous and contain potassium, folate, and vitamin B6 and have been shown to be good for the health of our digestive tract- particularly the colon.

            Hush Hush Lasagna

              Hush Hush Lasagna

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              This one contains four beneficial veggies: carrots, zucchini, peppers, and onions. Carrots are very rich in vitamin A with good doses of biotin and vitamin K. Peppers are good sources of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin B6. Onions have vitamin C and chromium which help in regulating blood sugar.

              White and Green Pizza

                White and Green Pizza

                Popeye ate spinach for a reason. It is really good for you. It is rich in iron and is also an excellent source of vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, and folic acid as well as being a good source of manganese, magnesium, iron, and vitamin B2. What kid doesn’t love pizza?

                Four Cheese Bake

                  Four-Cheese Pasta Bake

                  Sticking with the spinach theme, this dish puts three cups of that green goodness into a meal.

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                  Sweet Potato French Toast

                    Sweet Potato French Toast

                    Sweet potatoes pack a powerful vitamin A punch. They are also full of vitamin B6 and C. Here is a breakfast recipe to hide them in plain sight. When is the last time you turned down French toast for breakfast?

                    Chocolate Avocado Pudding

                      Chocolate Avocado Pudding

                      Does your kid like pudding? Of course! This is a great way to hide something green in desserts. Avocados contain healthy monounsaturated fatty acids and have more potassium than bananas! Since most people don’t get their recommended daily requirements of potassium, this is a great way to keep that dessert on the menu while also staying healthy.

                      Featured photo credit: Jordan Strickler via agrimediaonline.com

                      More by this author

                      Jordan Strickler

                      Owner, AgriMediaOnline.com

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                      Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                      How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

                      How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

                      Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

                      The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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                      The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

                      Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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                      Review Your Past Flow

                      Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

                      Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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                      Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

                      Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

                      Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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                      Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

                      Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

                      We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

                      Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

                        Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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