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4 Things You Should Definitely Do Before Turning 30

4 Things You Should Definitely Do Before Turning 30

Turning 30 is a terrifying prospect for a lot of people, even if, in practical terms, nothing really changes when you wake up on the morning of that dreaded birthday. Psychologically speaking, however, the impact of reaching this particular milestone can be huge.

It can feel like the pressure to be a ‘grown-up’ has suddenly increased tenfold, and with our 20s suddenly behind us, we can experience a sense of loss and regret, as though time is running out to follow our dreams.

But it doesn’t need to be this way. It’s all about perspective, and taking the time to do these four things will help set you up to tackle the challenges of life after 30 and eliminate regrets.

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1. Take risks and fail

There’s nothing to say you should stop taking risks once you reach your 30s, but are you really all that likely to if you never have before?

Failure is a part of life and shouldn’t put us off trying new things, but all too often, that isn’t the case. The good news is, the more often you take risks that don’t quite work out, the more courage you develop to face the challenges life throws at you in the future.

Taking risks in your 20s, regardless of the outcome, helps you develop a thicker skin, which sets you up nicely for more success in your 30s. You’ll learn a lot, too, and that’s never a bad thing.

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2. Explore what you like… and what you don’t like

There’s plenty of time to stick to one thing later, so take the opportunity to explore who you are and what you want. Not sure about your job? Try something different while you can. And if you don’t know whether or not you’ll like the alternative, you can always change again. How will you know whether something else is better for you if you don’t give it a go?

Use your 20s to find out what you like, who you like, and what you want to do with the rest of your life. There’s no need to make any firm decisions just yet, and when you do, you’ll be more certain they’re the right ones for you.

The longer you leave it to make a change, the harder it is, and that makes you feel pressured into settling for a less than perfect life. Take the chance to try as much as you can early on and you’ll have a fully developed idea of where you’re headed.

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3. Figure out which learning methods work best for you

People often say that we never stop learning, and it’s true in every sense. For our personal and professional development, we continually educate ourselves throughout life, and at no point is this more important than the crucial growth and career advancement stage during our 30s.

Your 20s are the perfect time to figure out how you learn most effectively so that by the time you hit 30, you’ll already have it down.

Do you learn things best from other people? Are you more someone whose personal growth comes from contemplative time spent alone? A big reader who gains the most knowledge from books? Maybe you’re a mix, or something else entirely. Whatever it is that helps you learn, it’s for you and you alone to figure out, and the sooner you do so, the more time you’ll have to put it into practice for lifelong improvement.

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4. Travel to a lot of different places

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness,” Mark Twain famously wrote, and, as it happens, science has proven him right [1].

When we experience different cultures, we gain a greater understanding of the world as a whole and its interconnected nature, and that is a huge positive in terms of personal growth, building trust and empathy towards our fellow humans. Extensive travel is beneficial on a more simple level, too. It can be relaxing, exciting and everything in between, and gives us experiences that aren’t possible otherwise.

While it’s still possible – and absolutely recommended – to travel whenever we can throughout life, for most people it’s easiest during our 20s, before too much responsibility sets in and we suddenly don’t have the time anymore.

What’s more, the memories you make traveling before turning 30 will set you up with an enduring wanderlust that makes you far more likely to keep traveling later in life, with all the benefits it brings.

Reference

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Last Updated on June 24, 2019

Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

A study [1] published in Depression and Anxiety found that social media users are more likely to be depressed. This was just one of the huge number of studies linking social media and depression[2] . But why exactly do platforms like Facebook and Instagram make people so unhappy? Well, we don’t know yet for sure, but there are some explanations.

Social Media Could Lead to Depression

Depression is a serious medical condition that affects how you think, feel, and behave. Social media may lead to depression in predisposed individuals or make existing symptoms of depression[3] worse explains[4] the study above’s senior author Dr. Brian Primack. So, the problem may not be in social media per se, but how we use it.

Signs You’re Suffering From “Social Media Depression”

If you feel like social media is having a negative impact on your mood, then you may be suffering from “social media depression.” Look for symptoms like:

• low self-esteem,

• negative self-talk,

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• a low mood,

• irritability,

• a lack of interest in activities once enjoyed,

• and social withdrawal.

If you’ve had these symptoms for more than two weeks and if this is how you feel most of the time, then you are likely depressed. Although “social media depression “is not a term recognized in the medical setting, social media depression seems to be a real phenomenon affecting around 50% of social media users. As explained in a review study[5] published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, if a person has a certain predisposition to depression and other mental disorders, social media use may only worsen their mental health.

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Social Media Could Crush Self-Esteem

We know that social media and depression are in some way linked, but why is this so? Well, according to Igor Pantic, MD, Ph.D.[6], social media use skews your perception about other people’s lives and traits. To explain this further, most people like to portray an idealized image of their lives, personal traits, and appearance on sites like Facebook and Instagram. If you confuse this idealized image with reality, you may be under the false impression that everyone is better than you which can crush your self-esteem and lead to depression. This is especially true for teens and young adults who are more likely to compare themselves to others. If you already suffer from low self-esteem, the illusion that everyone has it better off than you will just make you feel worse.

Causing Social Isolation and Other Negative Emotions

Another commonly cited reason for the negative impact of social media on mental health is its link with social isolation. Depressed people are more likely to isolate themselves socially and chose only to interact indirectly through social media platforms. But communication online tends to be superficial and is lacking when compared to real-life interaction explains Panic. What this means is not that social media leads to isolation but the other way around, possibly explaining why we find so many depressed persons on these sites.

Lastly, social media use may generate negative emotions in you like envy, jealousy, dislike, loneliness, and many others and this may worsen your depressive symptoms.

Why We Need to Take This Seriously

Both depression and social media use are on the rise according to epidemiological studies. Since each one has an impact on the other, we have to start thinking of healthier ways to use social media. Teens and young adults are especially vulnerable to the negative impact of social media on mental health.

Advice on Social Media Use

Although these findings did not provide any cause-effect explanation regarding Facebook and depression[7], they still do prove that social media use may not be a good way to handle depression. For this reason, the leading authors of these studies gave some suggestions as to how clinicians and people can make use of such findings.

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One suggestion is that clinicians should ask patients about their social media habits. Then they can advise them on how to change their outlook on social media use or even suggest limiting their time spent on social media.

Some social media users may also exhibit addictive behavior; they may spend too much time due to compulsive urges. Any compulsive behavior is bound to lead to feelings of guilt which can worsen depressive symptoms.

Having Unhealthy Relationship with Social Media

If you feel like your relationship with social media is unhealthy, then consider the advice on healthy social media use provided by psychology experts from Links Psychology[8]:

Avoid negative social comparison – always keep in mind that how people portray themselves and their lives on social media is not a realistic picture, but rather an idealized one. Also, avoid comparing yourself to others because this behavior can lead to negative self-talk.

Remember that social media is not a replacement for real life – Social media is great for staying in touch and having fun, but it should never replace real-world interactions.

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Avoid releasing personal information – For your safety and privacy, make sure to be careful with what you post online.

Report users who bully and harass you – It’s easy to be a bully in the anonymous and distant world of social media. Don’t take such offense personally and report those who abuse social media to harass others.

The bits of advice listed above can help you establish a healthy relationship with social media. Always keep these things in mind to avoid losing an objective perspective of what social media is and how it is different from real life. If you are currently suffering from depression, talk to your doctor about what is bothering you so that you can get the treatment you need to get better. Tell your doctor about your social media use and see if they could give you some advice on this topic.

Reference

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