Advertising
Advertising

7 Bio Hacks For Increased Productivity and High Performance

7 Bio Hacks For Increased Productivity and High Performance

I have been biohacking for about 5 years now, which means studying diet and lifestyle closely and figuring out what the most successful and balanced people do in order to increase their energy level. As you well know, having enough energy is crucial if we want to increase our productivity, performance, and happiness.

Here are 7 biohacks to give you much more energy and cognitive abilities so you can be much more productive and happy. These 10 biohacks work well for me, but please consider talking to a nutritionist or doctor first. Also, you don’t have to try all of these biohacks; maybe try a few at first to see if you have more energy:

Advertising

  1. Smaller Meals: Instead of consuming 3 big meals per day, consume 5 small ones as your digestive system won’t make you very tired if the meals are small (try to have green vegetables with each meal). You will be much more productive and focused at work by consuming smaller meals so that your digestive system doesn’t use most of the energy you have to digest large meals.
  2. Juicing: Make 7 jars or containers of juice every Sunday for the week. In these 7 containers, I put greatest hits of everything that I think is good for me. I bring 5 of the containers to work as this becomes one of my meals. The other 2 I leave at home for weekend consumption.
  3. Coconut Water: At the gym, I drink coconut water as this gives me off-the-charts energy. I exercise for at least an hour per day at around 4pm. I start with 60 minutes on the elliptical trainer as this works out all muscle groups while I read emails and other articles on my iPad (you can retain so much more information later in the day when you exercise and read at the same time given the increased oxygen intake).
  4. Plug Vitamin Gaps: We are all deficient in certain vitamins – we don’t know exactly which ones. As a result, I take a multivitamin pack every day that plugs every vitamin deficiency gap for me.
  5. Hydrate: I drink 8 glasses of water per day and I put lemon in the water as well. Before having a second serving during meals, drink a glass of water, which can curb your appetite. Always pack a few bottles of water with you no matter where you are (especially during your commute to and from work).
  6. Try to Limit Complex Carbohydrates– meaning limit bread or rice- or corn-based products as they convert quickly to fat.  Here is a great tip: always deduct the amount of fiber from the total carbohydrates as your digestive system will think that the total carbs is lower than it actually is. In the example in the image below, we take 21 grams of carbs minus 17 grams of fiber for a “net carbs” amount of only 4 grams.
  7. Sleep:  This one is incredibly important as it not only slows down aging but increases our productivity, focus, happiness and many other benefits. Try to always get 7-8 hours of sleep without exception. 7-8 hours is only about ~30% of each day. Imagine what would happen to our car if we used it for 70% of every single day? Of course, we could run out of gas and have to fix it more often. 30% of our days rest for us is mandatory. Many people would then say – I don’t have time for sleep as I have too much work or studying or whatever. I humbly disagree. Why? Because I really believe that one hour of productivity on 7-8 hours of sleep is at least 5x’s more productive than one hour of productivity on 3-4 hours of sleep. Invest in yourself by sleeping 7-8 hours per day as it will not only improve your quality of life but also increase your lifespan.

These 7 biohacks will help you to live life on your terms.

Advertising

We are all different so please find the right combination of the 7 aforementioned biohacks until you feel like you have more energy, focus and you are more productive than literally anyone you know. You will be much happier too if you figure out which biohacks work best for you.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Stockunlimited via Stockunlimited.com

Advertising

More by this author

Andreas Jones

Business Growth Strategist, Consultant and Coach.

7 Bio Hacks For Increased Productivity and High Performance 5 Problems Everyone Has With Leadership and How To Solve Them Warning: These 9 Mistakes Will Destroy Your Leadership Effectiveness 7 Traits of Highly Effective Leaders In The 21st Century 5 Reasons Why Introverts Make Great Business Leaders

Trending in Brain

1 What Is Analysis Paralysis (And How to Overcome It) 2 How to Unleash the 4 Types of Creativity In You 3 What Are Creative Problem Solving Skills (And How To Improve Yours) 4 How to Improve Memory: 7 Natural (and Highly Effective) Ways 5 9 Types of Intelligence (And How to Know Your Type)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Published on October 22, 2020

What Is Analysis Paralysis (And How to Overcome It)

What Is Analysis Paralysis (And How to Overcome It)

Have you ever taken so long trying to solve a problem that you just ended up going around in circles? How about trying to make a major decision and just freezing up when the time to decide came?

You might have found yourself gathering too much information, hoping it will help you make the best decision—even if it takes you too long to do so. This probably led to many missed opportunities, especially in situations where you needed to act on time.

Nobody wants to make the wrong decision. However, delayed decision making can have a hugely negative impact on all aspects of your life—from your personal relationships to your career. Delaying important decisions can be the worst decision of all.

At one point or another, people get stuck at a decision impasse they can’t seem to overcome. This is due to a mental blindspot called information bias, informally known as analysis paralysis.

Analysis Paralysis and Stalled Decisions

Information bias, or analysis paralysis, is our tendency to seek more information than is needed to make decisions and take action.[1] It is one of many cognitive biases that cause us to make mistakes during the decision-making process.

A related cognitive bias is the status quo bias, which is our tendency to prefer that things stay the same and fear any changes.[2] Together with analysis paralysis, these two dangerous judgment errors pose a threat to our successful navigation through our rapidly-shifting world.

Consider what happened to Lily, a consulting client of mine who’s a mid-level manager in the UX department of a large tech company. Lily had been there for 5 years and was thinking about switching to a startup after a couple tried to recruit her.

Advertising

However, she had been taking a lot of time making a decision. In fact, before she contacted me, she had already gathered information and talked to a lot of people for 7 months. Realistically, more information won’t sway her decision, but she kept trying to gather more information.

And then, there was the technology company that came to me after their growth started to decline. The company had initially experienced rapid growth with a couple of innovative products. However, its growth started to decrease—unfortunate, but not unexpected.

Essentially, the company’s growth followed the typical S-curve growth model, which starts as a slow and effortful start-up stage. This is followed by a rapid growth stage, then a slowdown in growth, often following market saturation or competitive pressure or other factors. This is the point where the company’s existing products reach maturity.

However, even before a slowdown hits, forward-thinking companies would innovate and change things up proactively. This is so they could have new products ready to go that would maintain rapid growth.

Unfortunately, this wasn’t the case with this particular tech company. Not only did they not address the potential decline but once the company’s growth stalled, the leaders dug their heels in and stayed the course. They kept on analyzing the market to find the cause of the problem.

Worse, a couple of executives in the company proposed launching new products, but most of the leadership was cautious. They kept on asking for guarantees that the products would be a success, demanding more information even when additional information wasn’t relevant.

Both Lily and the tech company remained paralyzed by too much information when they should already have taken action. While this situation isn’t unexpected, it is totally avoidable.

Advertising

As I told both parties when they consulted me, all they needed to do was to face analysis paralysis head-on and make a decision. But they had to follow the best decision-making process available first, didn’t they?

8-Step Decision-Making Process to Avoid Analysis Paralysis

I told Lily and the leaders at the tech company that we should never go with our gut if we want to avoid disasters in our personal and professional lives.[3] Instead, I advised them, as I advise you now, to follow data-driven, research-based approaches, such as the one I’ll outline below.

From hiring a new employee, launching a new product, selecting a Zoom guest speaker for your annual video conference to deciding whether to apply for a higher-level position within your company, the following steps will help you fight analysis paralysis and make the best decisions possible.

1. Identify the Need to Launch a Decision-Making Process

This is particularly important when there’s no explicit crisis that cries out for a change or decision to be made. Such recognition is also applicable when your natural intuitions are keeping you from acknowledging the need for a tough decision.

Remember that the best decision-makers take the initiative to recognize the need for decisions before they become an emergency. They also don’t let gut reactions cloud their decision-making capacity.

2. Gather Relevant Information From a Wide Variety of Informed Perspectives

Listen especially to opinions you disagree with. Contradicting perspectives empower you to distance yourself from the comfortable reliance on your gut instincts, which can sometimes be harmful to decision-making. Opposing ideas also help you recognize any potential bias blind spots, and this allows you to come up with solutions that you may not have otherwise.

3. Paint a Clear Vision of Your Desired Outcome

Using the data gleaned from step 2, decide which goals you want to reach. Paint a clear vision of the desired outcome of your decision-making process. You should also recognize that what seems to be a one-time decision may turn out to be a symptom of an underlying issue with current processes and practices. Make addressing these root problems part of the outcome you want to achieve.

Advertising

4. Make a Decision-Making Process Criteria

Make a decision-making process criteria to weigh the various options of how you’d like to get to your desired outcome. As much as possible, develop these criteria before you start to consider choices. Our intuitions bias our decision-making criteria to encourage certain outcomes that fit our instincts. As a result, you get overall worse decisions if you don’t develop criteria before starting to look at options.

5. Generate Several Viable Options

We tend to fall into the trap of generating insufficient options to make the best decisions, and this can lead to analysis paralysis. To prevent this, you should generate many more options than you usually would. Generate several viable options that can help you achieve your decision-making process goals. Go for 5 attractive options as the minimum.

Keep in mind that this is a brainstorming step, so don’t judge options no matter how far fetched they might seem. In my consulting and coaching experience, the optimal choice often involves elements drawn from out-of-the-box options.

6. Weigh These Options and Pick the Best One

When weighing your options, beware of going with your initial preferences. Try to see your preferred choice in a harsh light. Also, do your best to separate each option from the person who proposed it. This minimizes the impact of personalities, relationships, and internal politics on the decision itself.

7. Implement the Option You Chose

For implementing the decision, you need to minimize risks and maximize rewards, since your goal is to get a decision outcome that’s as good as possible.

First, imagine that the decision completely failed. Then, brainstorm about all the problems that led to this failure. Next, consider how you might solve these problems, and integrate the solutions into your implementation plan.

Next, imagine that the decision absolutely succeeded. Brainstorm all the reasons for success and consider how you can bring these reasons into life. Then, integrate what you learned into implementing the decisions.

Advertising

Finally, develop clear metrics of success that you can measure throughout the implementation process. This will enable you to check if you’re meeting the goals you identified in step 3. It will also help guide your goal-setting process—something to keep in mind when you use this decision-making technique again in the future.

8. Set a Reminder to Use the Process for Future Decisions

Regularly check if it’s time to employ the decision-making process once again. As discussed in the first step, there may be times when there’s no explicit crisis that cries out for a change, even though underlying issues might already be signaling that it’s time for a tough decision.

Setting a reminder—perhaps a visual one such as a note on your desk, or even just a scheduled alert on your phone—will ensure that you can catch decision-making cues before they’re due.

While Lily and the tech company initially had to fight off a lot of discomforts when using the process, they were ultimately rewarded with sound decisions they were immensely satisfied with.

This battle-tested method will do the same for you. It will certainly propel your decision-making and, at the same time, help you thwart analysis paralysis and avoid decision disasters.

Conclusion

Nobody wants to make the wrong decision, but you also don’t want to take too long and miss opportunities. By using a data-driven and research-based approach to decision making, you can nip analysis paralysis in the bud and make the best decisions.

More Tips to Overcome Analysis Paralysis

Featured photo credit: Muhmed El-Bank via unsplash.com

Reference

Read Next